THE HILLS ECHO

Spring 2004

 

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

OPEN GARDEN DAY

PINNER ROAD SCHOOL

PLANNING REPORT

WEB SITE

OVERSEAS VOLUNTEERING

NORTHWOOD AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

RADIO MOUNT VERNON

ROAD STEWARDS

THE HINMAN CONSERVATION SHIELD

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

RETIREMENT / PENSIONS

NORTHWOOD LIONS CLUB

HILLSIDE JUNIOR SCHOOL

NORTHWOOD SOUNDS

HARLYN SCHOOL THANK YOU

NHRA 70th BIRTHDAY

NORTHWOOD NOTABILITIES – No. 1: Mr. H. E. PEACHEY

WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

MYRTLE FARM AND MIDDLETON DRIVE

THE ASSOCIATION NEEDS YOUR HELP

MY DIAGNOSIS A.A.A.D.D. – AGE ACTIVATED ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER

SPECIALIST TRAVEL INSURANCE

THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL - VOLUNTARY SERVICES DEPARTMENT

HAYDON SCHOOL RATED AS OUTSTANDING BY INSPECTORS

PINNER HILL ESTATE, HOUSE AND GOLF CLUB

AGE CONCERN A & E SCHEME HELPS HUNDREDS at HILLINGDON

C.P.I. CANINE PARTNERS FOR INDEPENDENCE

AGE CONCERN HILLINGDON…….WHO ARE WE????

MOBILE PHONE MASTS

PHEOS MUSICAL PLAYERS PRESENTS THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

ROUND AND ROUND WE STILL GO!

DEVELOPMENTS IN NORTHWOOD HILLS

NORTHWOOD HEALTH CENTRE

LIFE AND A CUP OF TEA

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CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

This the end of my first year as your Chairman, and during that time we have seen a number of events and developments in the area.

The Joel Street roundabout remodelling is nearly finished as I write. We thank Lynne Halse for the work she did in dealing with the local authority. We also salute the work of one of our residents involved in campaigning against the proliferation of mobile phone masts in the area.

The Northwood and Pinner Cottage Hospital’s move to Mount Vernon has been delayed until a more suitable site has been found there.

As you will read in the Planning Report, the Tesco Express at Tolcarne Drive is up and running. The effect on local businesses is being monitored.

We now have local police support officers patrolling the streets. They are very happy to stop for a chat.

I attended the 70th anniversary celebration at Northwood School (Potter Street School in the old days). This proved to be a happy occasion.

To show our appreciation of the work of our Road Stewards, we held our annual party in February. This was a most enjoyable evening, with wonderful food, for which Margot and all her helpers deserve many thanks.

Finally, don’t forget that if you have a problem, bring it to the attention of the Committee. We will help if we can.

Have a good summer.

Betty Walley

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OPEN GARDEN DAY

After the resounding success of the ‘Open Garden Day’ in 2002 it has been decided to repeat the pleasurable experience in 2004.

A number of private gardens in Ruislip, Eastcote, Northwood and Ickenham will be open to visitors on June 27thbetween 11am and 5pm.

Fervent gardeners and appreciative viewers alike can enjoy the day. Who knows, perhaps the appreciative viewers could become fervent gardeners, but the idea is that you can wander around private gardens in the area.

The cost is £5 if tickets are purchased prior to the 27th June or £6 on the day. This cost enables you to view all the gardens in the scheme, the money going to local charities. You enjoy the day, the charities benefit from the money.

In some of the gardens you will be able to buy plants and refreshments. So, if your day is planned well you may be able to enjoy, coffee, lunch and afternoon tea in pleasant surroundings.

If you would like more information about this event, please contact: Tony, 235, Eastcote Road, Ruislip. or phone 01895 677925. Tickets and maps are available.

Peter Powell, Joel Street

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PINNER ROAD SCHOOL

As many of you will know, the "Ruislip & Northwood Gazette" contacted me soon after my article about the school was published in the last edition of the "Echo". They produced an excellent feature the following week and, as a result, a number of former pupils now living away from Northwood Hills got in touch with me, in addition to the very good response which my original article produced. A message about the planned book has been put on the "Friends Reunited" website as well.

It was very pleasing to hear from so many former pupils, in all age groups, ranging from those who attended the school in the 1920s to a near neighbour (who did not look nearly old enough!) who was at "Pinner Road" when it closed its doors in December 1975, and transferred to the new Hillside School. The headmaster of Hillside School has kindly consented to my borrowing all of the "Pinner Road" log-books, plus some other records, and I have found much fascinating material there, for inclusion in the book of the school's history.

I should have used the word "original" when referring to the "house" names in my first article, as several people have correctly advised me of the later names used, Romans (blue), Saxons (green), Danes (red) and Normans (yellow), from 1951 until at least the mid 1980s. Thanks to various people, and some further research, the four original "houses" are now known to be Pinner (green), Northwood (red), Ruislip (yellow) and Eastcote (blue). These were introduced in 1926, but in the 1934/35 school year were reduced to three, as Eastcote was dropped, logically because the number of pupils was reduced by about a third in January 1934, when the senior school opened in Potter Street. Three "houses" became four again, when the new names were brought in, in 1951.

I am still very keen to obtain further memories of the old school, so if you have something to contribute, please get in touch, by writing to me at 24 Middleton Drive, Pinner, Middlesex HAS 2PG. Every such contact will be acknowledged, and I am particularly interested in borrowing any old photographs and other memorabilia, for copying. Everything loaned will be properly looked after, and returned to you as soon as possible. My sincere thanks are due to everyone who has contacted me to date with their most interesting memories of their schooldays.

Another point of discussion has arisen since my original article, and I hope it can be resolved by someone reading this. Although not strictly to do with "Pinner Road", the place in question is situated very close to the site of the old school, and was very much on the route of many pupils. On the left hand corner of Windsor Close there was a cafe, from the 1940s until the early 1950s, I believe. Can anyone please provide the name of this establishment? Bata Shoe Shop was of course on the opposite corner for many years.

Alan Carter

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PLANNING REPORT

Tesco Express - This opened in January and appears to be well patronized. As feared, it has had an effect on nearby small shops. I have visited a few of the most vulnerable and all had seen a drop in sales. One was seriously affected owing to the fact that they sold similar wares.

The small shops in Joel Street have served us well over the years and we hope customers will not be drawn to the bright lights of Tesco. Many residents objected to this project and now have an opportunity to show appreciation to the shops that are suffering.

Northwood Health Centre - Some months ago an outline planning application for a new centre on the site of the current one was submitted to the Council Planning Committee. We did not object, subject to adequate parking being provided.

Next, there was a proposal for a temporary centre in Potter Street, on school land. This was strongly opposed by local residents because of traffic problems and parking. We supported this and insisted on prior public consultation before any decision.. The health authorities then withdrew the application and held a badly advertised consultation meeting.

The present proposals are:–

a) All patients in the Cottage Hospital to be transferred permanently to Mount Vernon.

b) Three of the four G.P. practices to be transferred to the C.H. during construction of new Centre

c) A temporary building to be erected at M.V. on approach road left side for the Steven Shackman practice.

d) The new health centre will be built on the site of the existing one. This will accommodate 3 practices and one doctor from the Steven Shackman practice.

e) A permanent centre will be built at M.V. on the right of the approach road to replace the temporary building on the left.

I understand that the new centres will be called Primary Care Centres. We will watch carefully development of these proposals. Completion is expected to take two years, but at the time of writing no planning applications have been received.

Shops, change of use - It is our policy to object to any change from retail to restaurant. Recent applications affected by this those for Mini-Modes and Miracles (Ladies’ Hairdressers). We have at times received criticism but believe that if Joel Street is to survive we cannot afford to lose any further retail outlets. We already have many places to eat. They are no problem but any increase would affect the viability of our shopping parade.

Lishman Easby

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WEB SITE

Don’t forget to look at our web-site from time to time, it is updated regularly and we would welcome suggestions about content. If you have any contributions or comments, please contact Ray Krystofiak on 020 8866 3241 who will be please to hear from you. www.northwoodhills.co.uk

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OVERSEAS VOLUNTEERING

No, it’s not just for the young. Retired people are also required. How would you like to spend a two week holiday helping under-privileged children in India or perhaps devote a couple of months to promoting human rights in Peru? There’s a huge range of overseas volunteer placements through Leeds-based i-i. Request their Mature Ventures brochure for four to 24-week placements in 23 countries for 22 – 80 year olds, or the Escapes brochure, which has one to three-week placements in 12 countries for people aged 18-80. There’s also a Gap Ventures brochure available for 18-22 year old. Take a look at the website: www.i-to-i.com or tel. 0870 333 2332.

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NORTHWOOD AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

We are delighted to say that the Association is flourishing, with more new members joining us. We are now up to almost 250. Our new activity, line dancing has proved very popular and we now have a really good group. It would seem that although nomadic we are attracting the attention of those people who wish to keep their minds and bodies active. If you are one of these and would like to join us, please contact the Secretary, Maureen Watkins 020 8868 5791 for more information.

Maureen Walkins

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RADIO MOUNT VERNON

It was in 1969 that Radio Mount Vernon first went ‘on air’, and although the hospital has changed considerably over the years, our aim is still the same: to provide entertainment for the patients during their stay in hospital – this is a top priority.

Back in 1969 the hospital took mainly local patients – this has changed over the years, and patients now come from a far wider area. This presents a problem as far as visitors are concerned, so a friendly face at the bedside is welcomed. Our volunteers visit the wards and chat with the patients on a regular basis. The request programmes provide the chance to hear the patients own selection of music.

The choice of music, as one would expect, is as diverse as the mix of patients, who represent a wide range of ages and interests – however, our extensive record library gives us the opportunity to find a high percentage of the music asked for.

We also broadcast the service from the hospital chapel on Sunday morning, and volunteers from the local churches are on hand to collect patients who wish, and are able to attend, to be transported by wheelchair to the chapel.

An operation as complex as a radio station naturally needs technical backup, and we are fortunate to have on call some qualified engineers to help out when necessary: again giving their services on a voluntary basis.

As a charity we depend on donations and fund raising to keep the station on air, and to cover expenses. We are always pleased to welcome new members along to the station, and can offer presenter training to suitable candidates.

If you are interested, and can give a couple of hours a week of your time, please call us on 01923 844532.

Iris Henry, Radio Mount Vernon

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ROAD STEWARDS

Everybody in Northwood Hills owes a tremendous debt to the Road Stewards who work on behalf of the Residents’ Association. They are our eyes and ears and in most cases live in the road they represent. They are able to feed back information and views to the Committee on issues that may only affect that road. As Committee Meetings are now held monthly, it is much easier to make early decisions and take an agreed line of action. We are fortunate that two Councillors regularly attend Meetings and so urgent matters can be fast-tracked and in many cases dealt with immediately. The Association works for everybody in the area and always makes an effort to reach difficult decisions only after consultation.

All the Road Stewards receive a copy of the Minutes (if possible by e-mail) so that they are aware of current issues and are able to feed these through to members. They also distribute “The Echo” and collect annual subscriptions – this is an excellent opportunity to exchange opinions and discuss local issues. Regular items that come up for discussion in committee are planning, environment, nuisances, policing, provision of services by the Council, improvements - and hot spots! Road Stewards, with their ears to the ground, can very often, alert members to problems before they develop, and this makes them easier to deal with.

The more Road Stewards there are, the better the Association can serve its members and Northwood Hills. The duties are rewarding and certainly not onerous. Automatically, you become a member of the Committee and you will receive a warm welcome at its meetings. We need your support and any suggestions you have for making Northwood Hills a better place. On Wednesday 26th May at 7.00 for 7.30pm we have our A.G.M. at Fairfield. Please try and come. It is your Association and together we can make a difference! If you are willing to volunteer as a Road Steward, please do let us know.

Robert Symes

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THE HINMAN CONSERVATION SHIELD

While readers may have heard of the Hinman Shield being awarded to young people for their contribution to Eastcote, not all will know how it came into existence, or about remarkable couple it commemorates.

In 1978 Mrs Margaret Ward-Dyer, whose mother had recently died at the age of 99, contacted me. For reasons that will become apparent, she wanted to commemorate her parents’ lives by enhancing a corner somewhere in Eastcote. Her proposal was to plant a copse of trees, underplanted with daffodils, at the end of the Long Meadow, very near where the family had lived in Cheney Street. This was done in the spring of 1979 and the copse remains a feature of the Long Meadow today. She also wished to involve Eastcote children in conservation, and to this purpose she presented a shield that could be awarded annually to a school, youth club or group such as scouts and guides, or even to an individual child.

Behind Mrs Ward-Dyers bequest lies an inspiring story. Her parents, Margaret and George Hinman, had moved to Eastcote in 1919 and lived in a house called Fyvie (now High Trees) at the lower end of Cheney Street. A little further down Cheney Street is Hornend, a Grade 11-listed building, which, at that time, was the home of a Mr and Mrs Philip. Coincidentally they were also named Margaret and George, and the two families became close friends. The Philip family produced the Philip Atlas that was used extensively in schools through out the United Kingdom.

Many living in Eastcote in those days were quite poor and worked on the local farms. There being no local school, the children had to walk to Ruislip for their education, a journey that was both long and tiring. Mrs Hinman decided to address this problem by establishing a foundation that would provide a school in Eastcote. She got all the local community involved, and everyone who could, paid sixpence a brick to help build a school in Fore Street, at the bottom of the hill. Although the original building has since been demolished – the John Grooms development now stands there – Fore Street still has its school.

The Hinman and Philip families continued to do many other good deeds together. They helped set up the Eastcote Women’s Institute and a Men’s Institute, with meetings held in a small tin-roof hut next to where the Q8 garage is in Eastcote village. The WI ladies were taught the importance of diet to health; there was handicraft and drama. One year they put on ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. Mr and Mrs Hinman were both independent councillors in the 1920s and 1930s, and it was during this period that Mrs Hinman saved the Long Meadow from development by Comben and Wakeling, who built the Eastcote Park estate on the opposite side of the River Pinn. Families and dog-walkers that use the Long Meadow regularly won’t need reminding just how much they owe to her intervention. She also resisted proposals to build a hotel on ‘Pretty Corner’ at the junction of Fore Street and Eastcote Road.

During the 1950s, Mrs Hinman went to Israel to visit a kibbutz. Her daughter asked her to plant a tree for her while she was there. In the event, along with the group known as Men of the Trees, she planted more than a hundred.

Yet, her daughter has asked me to say, Margaret Hinman was simply an ordinary woman who managed to do some extraordinary things. And as the shield named in her honour illustrated time and again, we are all, however ordinary, capable of doing something extraordinary to preserve our environment and the people who live in it.

HINMAN SHIELD WINNERS

1980 Local children for their work at Highgrove Nature Reserve.

1981 Eastcote YHA for helping to clean the River Pinn.

1982 Southbourne School sixth formers for constructive work at Highgrove Nature Reserve.

1983 Coteford Junior School for planting 2,500 daffodil bulbs and 2,500 crocus corms along the main entrance to their school

1984 Class 2 at Warrender School for their consistent work and interest in Highgrove Nature Reserve.

1986-87 The children of Grangewood School for making a butterfly garden

1988 4th Eastcote Beavers for helping great oaks from little acorns grow.

1989 Lady Bankes Junior School for creating a wildlife garden.

1995-96 The children of Newnham School for planting the tubs outside Eastcote Library.

1998-99 Warrender Junior School for planting bulbs in their school grounds.

1999-0 Newnham Junior School for introducing conservation into their school curriculum.

2001 St Swithun Wells School for growing a forest of the future. The children collected seeds and nuts from Ruislip Woods and grew them on. Eventually the small trees were planted in the grounds of Field End Junior School

2002 5th Eastcote Scouts for planting the garden at Eastcote station

2003 3rd Eastcote Guides for planting a drift of white daffodils and crocuses along Eastcote Road near Highgrove Pool.

Sheila Liberty - Chair, Eastcote Village Conservation Area Advisory Panel

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MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

The current, experimental, Saturday morning surgeries in Northwood Hills library have come to an end due to a very poor turn out. Currently the surgeries will be held monthly on the 3rd Tuesday of the month, at  Oaklands Gate. The room used is the Oasis room of the Methodist Church. Surgeries are from 8pm to 9pm, with our M.P. John Wilkinson. 

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HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

Harrow Cine and Video Society’s SPRING PUBLIC MOVIE SHOW will be held at Blackwell Hall, Uxbridge Road, Harrow Weald on Wednesday 14th April. Doors open at 7.30pm for 8pm start. Tickets at the door are £3.50, which includes interval refreshments.

The AUTUMN MOVIE SHOW is on Thursday 14th October at the Pinner Village Hall, Chapel Lane Car Park, Pinner. Doors open at 7.30 for 8pm start.

More information from Heather Lee on 020 8863 7628.

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NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

The following details concerning events at the school have been gleaned from recent Newsletters.

The raising of funds for the school’s bid for Specialist school status (Business and Enterprise) is proceeding well. The 70th anniversary reunion raised over £1,400, the Christmas draw over £2,400, while donations from BskyB, Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, and a former pupil running a theatre company in New Zealand, have raised about another £6,750.

As usual, however, donations to charity have not been forgotten. The nominated Christmas charity The Fragile X Society (the Fragile X Syndrome is the most common inherited cause of learning disability) benefited to the tune of £3,044. During last Autumn term pupils of 11Y raised £78 for breast cancer research.

Recent out-of-school trips have included a visit to the Savoy Theatre last term for Year 10 and 11 pupils, while 80 pupils from Years 8 and 9 enjoyed a long weekend in Normandy.

Academic and sporting success at its peak was seen in the achievement of a past pupil, Ruth Brown, who gained a 1st in French and German at Oxford (she was the fifth best in her year) and of a present Year 7 pupil, Hannah Matthews, who became the Middlesex Cross Country champion on 5 February and will represent the county in the English Schools Championships.

Finally, two members of staff are running in the London Marathon on 18 April, each aiming to raise £2000 for a charity concerned with babies – TOMMYS, research and education into premature birth, miscarriage and stillbirth, and Bilibed, providing medical equipment for babies suffering from severe jaundice. If you wish to become a sponsor, please contact the school.

Editor

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RETIREMENT / PENSIONS

In the past people tended to have a job for a lifetime. This is no longer true; with changes in technology it is possible to have several careers during a working life. One of the problems this situation exacerbates is that it is more than possible to lose track of a pension earned from earlier employment. If you believe that you are entitled to a pension from an earlier employer and do not have the details there is a scheme that will help you trace it. Call the Pension Scheme Registry, tel. 0191 225 6393 for details.

As far as the State Pension goes, if you haven’t received a claim form (BR1) from the Department for Work & Pensions (DWP) by three months before your due retirement date call the CWP on 0945 300 1084 and ask them to send it, or see the website: www.thepensionservice.gov.uk

Margot Barnikel

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NORTHWOOD LIONS CLUB

Our first article for the Hills Echo was submitted to introduce the Lions Club to the people of Northwood. It is now becoming a regular feature and it is difficult to avoid repetition. No doubt some readers will be inclined to move to the next page after reading this comment; thank you to those who persevere.

The club started our Fund raising activities this year with a collection at Waitrose, with the assistance of Philip and Margot Barnikel we raised £214.00 - many thanks to all those who contributed. All this money will be used to take a group of young carers to Chessington. Our rules require that all money raised for charity is used for charitable purposes, none can be taken for club administration costs.

We know that people get fed up with the number of tin shakes etc. they encounter but unfortunately there are so many very needy causes who rely on the generous support of the public. We therefore feel we must continue with this method of fund raising. We are also running an Easter egg raffle in some local Pubs, so please continue to support our efforts.

Among our community service activities we recently took a group of senior citizens to our Districts’ annual New Year party and will shortly be helping repaint a school hall in Oxhey.

On the social side some club members went to Germany to join in our twin club’s anniversary celebrations. We are planning theatre trips and other similar activities.

We have also started planning this years Northwood Carnival to be held on Bank Holiday Monday 30th August. Among the attractions we hope to have the Clowns Workshop which was popular last year, Vyners band, Children’s’ fun races and Hillingdon Hospital radio. So please put this date on your calender.

Eric Holland

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HILLSIDE JUNIOR SCHOOL

The past year has been the busiest and probably the most fruitful in the history of the school. The latest Ofsted inspection report was exceptional. The teaching was judged to be very good overall with some excellent lessons observed by the inspectors. The children’s behaviour, attitudes to learning and their positive views about the school were all singled out for praise by the team. The leadership and management of the school and the support of the governors were also judged to be very effective. The inclusive ethos of the school and personal development were regarded as excellent, whilst relationships were judged to be exemplary at all levels. Indeed, such was the praise of the school by the inspection team that Hillside was only one of two Hillingdon schools cited in the Chief Inspector’s annual report for 2003 as being “particularly successful” during the past four years. This was a great honour, and a tribute to the effectiveness of the partnership between staff, pupils, governors and parents.

Considerable improvements have been made to the building during the past year. We have modernised the art and craft areas, providing new sinks and storage cupboards. New toilets have been built, including adaptations for wheelchair use, and the school has become fully accessible with the addition of ramps and easy opening fire doors. Finally, after twelve years of planning and fund raising, all our windows have now been replaced, giving the external fascia a refreshing uplift whilst also improving the learning environment of the school.

We continue to run an enormous range of extra-curricular activities, before school, at lunch times and after school. These include tennis, hockey, cricket, badminton, football, netball, French conversation and French master classes, orchestral practice, art, chess, craft, swimming, and gymnastics all year round, with athletics and rounders clubs taking place during the summer term only.

The school undertakes a number of community-based activities. Last year these included inviting local older residents for tea and a chat. The special bond between old people and the young is a real joy to observe. The school choir also sang at a number of residential homes and luncheon clubs. Local residents were also invited to attend matinee performances of our Christmas production. Our building is also used in the evenings by local groups for activities such as Hillside Community Church, Tae Kwondo, keep fit, computer classes and Portuguese lessons. We also enjoy very close links with the local scout group across the road, and are happy to support them in any way we can.

If anyone has any suggestions for furthering our community links, or if they can offer their support directly to us in any way, please contact the school office on 01923 825991.

Finally, after almost 18 years as headteacher of Hillside Junior School, I have decided to take early retirement, and shall be leaving at the end of the summer term 2004. I intend to spend most of the year in France, returning to England to undertake freelance work on school improvement with Cambridge Education Associates. With such a strong staff and supportive governors, I am sure that under new leadership Hillside will continue to grow from strength to strength.

R H Waddy (Headteacher)

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NORTHWOOD SOUNDS

Hear the whistling chitter chattering wind.

Hear the tweet tweet of the birds.

Hear the wooh wooh of the train.

Hear the squeak of the swing going back and forth.

WHAT YOU FEEL

Feel then wind shoving you to one side.

Feel the see saw bumping as it goes up and down.

Feel the rough stones on the ground as you pick them up and chuck them.

Feel the smooth metal on the side of the car.

I hope you like living in northwood

Fleur Noriego-Constable, aged 7 years-Hillside Junior School

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HARLYN SCHOOL THANK YOU

On behalf of the pupils, staff and governors of Harlyn Primary School I would like to express my thanks to Northwood Hills Resident Association for securing funds, through a grant, to improve our pond area.

This environmental area was established some years ago so our pupils could extend their scientific knowledge and observe wild life. Over the years this area became overgrown and unused.

About eighteen months ago some of our current Year 6 pupils asked if it would be possible to clear the pond area with the view to begin re-using it as a science resource area.

We were lucky to involve the help of a group of British Conservation of Volunteers who came to our school for a day and cleared the area. The children observed this work and were fascinated by the amount of wild life they saw.

At the same time a member of the Residents Association contacted us with the view to applying for funds to help us make further improvements to the pond.

I am delighted to say these funds have been secured and we await the commencement of further work.

There is no doubt our pupils will benefit hugely from this work.

Many thanks to your Association, in particular Mr. Krystofiak, for all his hard work and enthusiasm.

Jackie Lack, Headteacher.

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NHRA 70th BIRTHDAY

Not mine! I am long past that. My only anniversary is 20 years as a Committee member, which I joined in 1984. No, the birthday to which I refer is far more important; it is our association, which was founded in 1934. In commemoration I have asked our editor to print a tribute to Harry Peachey that first appeared in the “The Resident” (as it then was) of December 1957.

This was the official organ of our association from 1948, published once or twice a year. In between, members were kept informed by a small newsletter called “The Pup”. Later, “The Resident” was discontinued and members had to be content with the newsletter until 1991, when Leslie Hodson, as editor, produced “The Hills Echo”.

Harry Peachey lived at 55 Briarwood Drive. At first he named the association “The Briardale Ratepayers Association”, which developed into “The Northwood Hills Ratepayers Association” and finally into “The Northwood Hills Residents’ Association”. Same organisation, just a different name.

Looking at old copies of “The Resident” it seems that our association was very active socially. An annual dinner dance was held as well as regular whist drives. In December a regular children’s party was held, the cost of which in 1958 was:

Hire of Hall £2.1.9d

Catering & presents £34.17.2d

Entertainers £7.7.0d

Gratuity& expenses £3.11.0d

Total £48.1.11d

The cost was covered by the surplus from whist drives.

The association was involved in many negotiations involving train and bus services, with trying to establish a community hall and, even then, dealing with extensive examples of vandalism, including arson.

A persisting problem has been the shortage of Road Stewards. Perhaps, at some time in the future, “The Hills Echo” will announce the area is fully covered. Just wishful thinking

Lishman Easby

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NORTHWOOD NOTABILITIES – No. 1: Mr. H. E. PEACHEY

Whenever there is talk of the early days of Northwood Hills, the name of Harry Ernest Peachey is bound to be mentioned. A member of a large Victorian family, he was born in Hull in 1881. With only a short board school education behind him, he left school at the age of 12, and after having had a series of dead-end jobs, he was apprenticed to the building industry where his wages were nothing at all for the first month, and then the mag­nificent sum of 2s. 6d. per week out of which he was expected to provide his own tools.

At the age of 25, he left Hull and joined the firm of R. J. Patchett, who were engaged in heavy industrial building in Brad­ford. With them Harry Peachey rose steadily through the trade, so that when they decided to form a new company to operate at Northwood in 1930, he was sent down here to manage it. This was the beginning of Belton Estates and the foundation of Northwood Hills as we know it to day.

Before venturing south, he had met and married Miss Alice Marsh, also of Bradford, and had founded his family of five daugh­ters and one son. Mrs. Peachey was a great inspiration to him and did more than her share in creating the community spirit in the pioneer days of Northwood Hills. Her death in 1951, the year after their Golden Wedding, was a severe blow and a great loss to the district.

You have to know Harry Peachey to appreciate him. To the casual observer he is the typical blunt Yorkshire man, whose intolerance of fools and shams is plain for all to see. A man with no bias on creed or colour, but a real driver and hard worker. Beneath that hard exterior there beats a heart of gold, and an appeal on behalf of local charities never fails to find him responding.

But it is the children of the district – now of course grown up – who will always recall him with pleasure. His Bonfire Nights were, things to remember – there was always plenty of wood from cleared sites to make a huge fire around which the children were regaled with hot roast potatoes, boiled peas and parkin, in true Yorkshire style.

Older residents will remember him as one of the first Presidents of the Chamber of Trade, founder of the Northwood Hills Cricket Club, and will recall with pleasure the " Holidays at Home" scheme and the fêtes and funfairs he used to organize on nearby fields, which brought in over a thousand pounds to our local hospitals.

Many of the problems and setbacks he faced in the early days of Northwood Hills would have daunted a lesser man, but Harry Peachey stuck to his principles with typical tenacity to create a district of which we can all be proud. One of the turning points in his career, and a personal triumph for him, was the day in 1933 when Northwood Hills Station was opened. If any one man could be said to have " brought the railway to Northwood Hills," that man would be Harry Peachey. Northwood Hills has never looked back since.

He rests on his laurels these days and they have been well earned.

P.S. Harry Peachey died in 1960

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WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

Spring is always a busy time of the year - and nowhere is that more true than in the life of the Christian Church. Easter is of course one of the major festivals of the Christian year, where we mark the trial and execution of Jesus Christ, and celebrate His subsequent glorious resurrection. Elsewhere a similar story of re-birth is seen in the natural world, as plants and animals emerge from their winter dormancy, and in our own lives and homes, as our thoughts turn to spring cleaning, unearthing the lawn mower from its entombment in the recesses of the shed, and stocking up at the garden centre.

Naturally, the most important events at St. Edmund’s Church are the services, where the public worship of God is conducted according to the pattern of the Church of England, led by the Vicar, Fr. Bruce Driver. The Easter season starts on Sunday 21st March, halfway through Lent, when we celebrate Mothering Sunday. The children of ‘Spectrum on Sunday’ (our Sunday School) are all given flowers to present to their Mothers. The service is also Church Parade for our very active Scouts, Cubs, Beavers, Brownies and Rainbows.

The following Sunday, 28th March, is called Passion Sunday. It is from this day that the Church concentrates of the suffering through which Christ passed - hence ‘passion’ - before His crucifixion. From this day until Easter, all decorations in the Church are veiled in purple (the colour of the penitential season of Lent), as a sign of the solemnity of the season. In recent years, the St. Edmund’s Choir have provided a service of music for Passiontide, and this year’s service, at 6.30 pm on Sunday 28th March, will feature J.S.Bach’s St. Luke Passion.

On Sunday 4th April, Holy Week starts with Palm Sunday. It is on this day that we celebrate Christ’s entry into Jerusalem, which was greeted with great joy by the ordinary people of that city, waving palm branches and laying them in his path as a sort of ‘red carpet’. To mark that occasion, at the start of the 10 am service we have the traditional procession carrying palms around the Church grounds.

The Maundy Thursday service commemorates the Last Supper, where Christ broke bread with His disciples for the last time. On Good Friday there is a series of 3 services, starting at 12 noon, during which we give thanks for Christ’s sacrifice upon the Cross. The following day, Holy Saturday, is a day of preparation. The Church is re-decorated, flowers are prepared, silver is polished, and in the evening at 8 pm there is a service that is the beginning of the celebration of the resurrection of Christ. It includes the lighting of the Paschal (‘Easter’) Candle (representing Christ risen as the light of the world), renewal of Baptismal vows, and the first Thanksgiving (‘Eucharist’) of Easter.

On Easter Sunday, 11th April, the 10 am service is the confirmation that Christ is indeed risen - there is a procession to the Easter Garden, the Church is filled with flowers, the Paschal Candle is in its place atop a pillar of Easter lilies. The Easter season continues through to Ascension Day (20th May) and Pentecost (30th May), when there are also special services.

Apart from worship, our regular programme of Classic Concerts continues. As a prelude to Classic Concerts’ 10th anniversary season, the Midsummer Supper Concert on Sunday 27th June at 7.00 pm will include the much requested Schubert ‘Trout’ Quintet. General booking for the concert and supper opens on 10th May. The tickets are £12.00, or £3.00 for the concert only, and will be available from the concert Box Office on 020 8866 4610.

And on 13th, 14th and 15th May, the Church’s Drama Group, Arrow Players, will be presenting a comedy called “Midsummer Mink”, by Peter Coke. Tickets from the Box Office on 020 8868 7785.

The Church will hold its Spring Fair on Saturday 22nd May, from 11.30 am - Plants, Cakes, Needlework, Sideshows, Games, Books, Tombola, Bouncy Castle, and of course Refreshments - loads of fun for all the family!

How do you find St. Edmund’s? Well, start from Northwood Hills circus and go towards Pinner Green. The Church is about 500 yards along the main road, on the left.

For more details, and to keep up to date with everything at St. Edmund’s, check out www.saintedmundschurch.org.uk, or call into the Church and pick up a copy of the Church Magazine - it’s all there!

MARCH

Sun 21 Mothering Sunday & Church Parade 10 am
Sun 28 Passion Sunday Service of Music 6.30 pm
(St. Luke Passion - J.S.Bach)

APRIL

Sun 4 Palm Sunday, with palms procession
Thur 8 Maundy Thursday
8pm The Mass of the Lord’s Supper
Fri 9 Good Friday
12 noon Family Service

1 pm The Preaching of the Passion

2 pm The Good Friday Liturgy
Sat 10 8 pm The Easter Ceremonies
Sun 11 EASTER DAY

8 am Holy Communion
10 am Parish Communion

MAY

Thur 13 - Sat 15
ARROW PLAYERS present “Midsummer Mink”
Thur 20 Ascension Day - 10 am & 8pm Communion
Sat 22 11.30 am SPRING FAIR
Sun 30 Pentecost - 8 am & 10 am Communion
6.30pm Choral Evensong

JUNE

Sun 6 Trinity Sunday
Thur 10 Corpus Christi - 10 am & 8pm Communion
Sun 27 7 pm Classic Concerts - Supper Concert

The Parish Church of St. Edmund the King, Pinner Road, Northwood Hills, Vicar : Fr. Bruce Driver 020 8866 9230

Mike Godden

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MYRTLE FARM AND MIDDLETON DRIVE

Myrtle Farm was a small farm which adjoined Joel Street Farm until the mid 1930s, when it was sold for housing development. Myrtle Cottage, which became the farmhouse, existed from at least the late eighteenth century, and was occupied by a Royal Naval Commander, retired on half-pay, for a long period during the nineteenth century, prior to the land being farmed. The first farmer appears to have been Mr Joseph Herridge, and the area farmed was initially much larger than that recorded by the 1910 Land Value Duty Survey, when Myrtle Farm occupied just 8½ acres, compared with the 75 acres of Joel Street Farm. In 1901 the farmer was Mr George Golding, who also had a milk delivery round, and he was the last occupant prior to the sale of the land in the 1930s.

Until the mid 1930s the only buildings in Joel Street were farms (Joel Street, Myrtle and Haydon Hall), public houses ("The Ship" and "The Woodman") and a few cottages. However when Northwood Hills Station opened in 1933, there was intensive housing development in the immediate area, resulting in much of Northwood Hills as we know it today.

Following the sale of Myrtle Farm, Middleton Drive and, a few years later, Chamberlain Lane were built on the site. The first houses appeared in Middleton Drive in 1937, and most were completed by late 1938. My parents bought No.24, a three bedroomed semi­detached house, for £790 (£40 deposit and a £750 mortgage) in October 1938. I was born in the house five years later, and have lived here ever since. The original eight houses in Chamberlain Lane were built at the end of World War II, together with two bungalows at the left hand end of Middleton Drive. Since those days a further twelve houses have been built in Chamberlain Lane, in the 1960s, and one more house (1a) in Middleton Drive, after part of the garden of No.l was sold. This increased the number of houses in the road to forty-four.

Those living on the left hand side of Middleton Drive have always enjoyed the open aspect of the fields of Joel Street Farm at the end of their gardens, and in the early years the road led to waste ground behind which was another field, owned by Haydon Hall Farm. This field was sold for building and the Haydon Drive Estate was completed around 1953, with the additional houses in Chamberlain Lane fronting it later.

Many families have lived in Middleton Drive for long periods, and there has always been much camaraderie in the road. A VE party was organised by my father in May 1945, for the children living in the road and in part of Joel Street, and was reported on in the local press (I have a copy of the article). This party included an open-air tea, sports and games for both adults and children, a children's concert, a bonfire with fireworks and it concluded with singing, dancing and games late into the night. "The Ship" kindly loaned furniture for the occasion, and I have most of the photographs which were taken on the day, although some are unfortunately of poor quality.

"Bonfire Night" was well celebrated in Middleton Drive in the 1940s and 1950s, and always on 5th November, whatever the weather, unlike some similar events today which are held on the nearest Saturday. On the waste ground at the end of the road, from each September onwards, the numerous youngsters among the residents enthusiastically constructed a huge bonfire, and the attendance on the night was always excellent, with large quantities of

fireworks being produced and set off. Although no organised supervision ever took place there was never an accident or any problems in all those years. Food was plentiful too, with potatoes and sausages brought to be cooked on the fire.

Heavy snowfalls, usually in the school Christmas holidays, were very common in my youth and these always brought the young population of the road out from their houses for very enjoyable activities, mass snowball fights and the setting up of lengthy and potentially dangerous "slides", not always wholly approved of by the adults!

For around three years from 1949 two caravans, named "Raven" and "Ascot", were sited on the waste ground at the end of the road. The occupants were not "squatters", they had proper rent agreements, and the adults were recorded on the electoral register. However the council were continually trying to make them leave, and they did so in 1952, despite being no trouble to anyone during their stay.

Thanks to the kindness of the Joel Street Farm manager the children of Middleton Drive had virtually unlimited access to the farm buildings and the fields whilst I was growing up, and everyone made the most of these recreational facilities – the stream which runs behind the houses was particularly popular in this respect. Despite the uneven nature of the fields, and the constant presence of the cows, many sporting contests (football, cricket and golf in particular) took place in those fields. Today the fields are fenced off, and the land has been sold, although thankfully no building work has yet started. Horses and cows can still be seen there quite regularly.

The people of the road continue to socialise, and a most enjoyable sixtieth anniversary party was held in two adjoining gardens in the summer of 1998, with a cake being baked for the occasion – a street party was considered too dangerous! There is a very active "Ladies Social Club", who regularly go out for meals, and it is good to see the original spirit and friendliness of the neighbours being continued to this day. Middleton Drive has always been an especially friendly place to live, and I wonder if being a cul-de-sac has helped in that respect?

One puzzle remains, however, and that is why the road was so named. I am not aware of it being named after a particular individual, nor I cannot find any reference to the naming in the local newspapers of the time, and logically we should be living in Myrtle Drive. Perhaps someone out there knows the answer?

I am most interested in finding out more about the history of Myrtle Farm. If anyone has any memories of the farm (especially any photographs), and also of Middleton Drive, I should be delighted to hear from them at 24 Middleton Drive, Pinner, Middlesex HAS 2PG.

Alan Carter

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THE ASSOCIATION NEEDS YOUR HELP

Help is urgently needed, particularly from anyone who is able to type and or has internet access. One job would be to assist our Planning Officer with a little typing and also the ability to access the Borough Web-site to print plans. Another would be to take on the responsibilities of Minutes Secretary. A third would be to stand at the A.G.M. for the position of Assn. Sec. and yet another to assist in producing this newsletter. Do YOU feel you could assist? Please call Margot – contact details on the front of this newsletter.

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MY DIAGNOSIS A.A.A.D.D. – AGE ACTIVATED ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER

I decided to wash my car. As I started towards the garage, I spotted the post on the hall table. (Thinks) I should go through the post before I wash the car. I lay the car keys on the table, put the junk mail in the rubbish bin under the table, and noticed that the bin is full. So… I put the bills back on the table and take out the rubbish first. Since I’m going to be quite near the post box when I take out the rubbish anyway, I might as well pay the bills first.

I see my chequebook on the table, but there is only one cheque left. My extra cheques are in my desk in the study. So…I go to my desk…where I find the bottle of juice that I had been drinking. I’m going to look for my cheques, but first I need to push the juice aside so that I don’t accidentally knock it over. But,…. The juice is getting warm and should be put in the refrigerator to keep it cold. Heading towards the kitchen with the juice, a vase of flowers on the counter catches my eye. They need to be watered. I set the juice down on the counter, and…find my reading glasses, for which I’ve been searching all morning. I had better put them back on my desk, but first…I’m going to water the flowers.

I set the glasses back down on the counter, fill a container with water, and suddenly spot the TV remote. Someone left it on the kitchen table. Tonight when we sit down to watch TV, we will be looking for the remote, but nobody will remember that it’s on the kitchen table. I should put it back in the sitting room where it belongs, but first…I’ll water the flowers. I splash some water on the flowers, but most of it spills on the floor. So…I put the remote back down on the table, and get some towels to wipe up the spill. Then I head down the hall trying to remember what I was planning to do.

At the end of the day, the car isn’t washed, the bills aren’t paid, there is a warm bottle of juice sitting on the counter, the flowers aren’t watered, there is still only one cheque in my chequebook, I can’t find the remote, I can’t find my glasses, and I don’t remember what I did with the car keys. I’m trying to figure out why nothing got done today; it’s quite baffling because I know I was busy all day long, and I’m really tired.

Does this ring any bells?

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SPECIALIST TRAVEL INSURANCE

Travel insurance, as you get older, or suffer from any long-term illnesses, becomes more and more difficult, and yet few of us are happy about travelling abroad without this cover. Most of the companies that offer insurance to the multitudes will not offer their wares to those of us over a certain age or yet those who have severe or terminal illnesses.

There are, however, one or two solutions. PJ Hayman offers specialist travel insurance policies including ones for people with terminal illnesses, ask about their Solutions policy. Or Pulse Insurance, which specialises in cover for people considered ‘high risk’ by other insurers. As a last resort you could contact the Association of British Insurers for details of brokers that can give specialist advice.

PJ Hayman, 023 9241 9050

Pulse Insurance, 01305 848850 – www.pulse-insurance.co.uk

Association of British Insurers, 020 7600 3333 – www.abi.org.uk

Margot Barnikel

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THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL - VOLUNTARY SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Volunteers at both Mount Vernon and Hillingdon Hospitals are required to help support our partner groups The League of Friends and the Comforts Fund.

Both of these organizations operate shops or facilities where patients, staff and visitors can stop for refreshments and purchase refreshments. There are refreshment outlets located in The Atrium, Outpatients and Radiotherapy at Mount Vernon Hospital provided by the Comforts Fund. Hillingdon Hospital has a Tea Bar located within Main Out-patients, operated by The League of Friends. Duties will include working out rota’s, keeping the snack bar’s stocked and serving patients, visitors and staff with refreshments and snacks. Both of these organizations, through the work of their volunteers work hard to provide services, which in turn provide monetary support for the Trust. This money is used to provide equipment for wards, departments and divisions at both Hospitals.

Please contact the Voluntary Services Manager, Tina Dinch at Hillingdon Hosp. tina.dinch@thh.nhs.uk or 01895 279856 or 01923 844264 at Mount Vernon.

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HAYDON SCHOOL RATED AS OUTSTANDING BY INSPECTORS

As reported in an earlier edition of the Echo, Haydon School was visited by the OFSTED inspectors in February, 2003. The school received a very good report. This year Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector in his Annual Report named Haydon as one of a small number of schools that Ofsted inspected which stood out as doing particularly well on virtually all fronts. These schools are doing the very best they can for the young people they serve and provide examples of best practice.

The school has grown in size in recent years and a possible reason for the excellent report is the superb facilities that the school can offer its students. Students have access to over 400 computers, and information and communication technology is now integral to a wide range of learning activities in the school. In addition, electronic whiteboards are appearing in an increasing number of classrooms, allowing new and exciting teaching methods within the classroom. A new language centre is in the process of construction and this will enable further development in the superb language provision already offered by the school. This new facility will also allow the school to significantly improve the facilities for sixth form teaching. It was no surprise to learn, therefore, that students themselves gave 100% positive responses in a recent questionnaire to the statement that the school benefits from being large.

Peter Woods - Headteacher

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PINNER HILL ESTATE, HOUSE AND GOLF CLUB

The first Pinner Hill House owner was Christopher Clitherow, a wealthy city merchant and Master of the Ironmongers Company. He was Lord Mayor of London in 1635, and afterwards knighted. Having purchased a large part of Pinner Hill he built a mansion about 1630. Sadly nothing of this original Pinner House remains (apart from the foundations as a crop mark), nor is there any illustration to show what it looked like. Sir Christopher and his wife Lady Mary lived in the House until it was sold to Sir Bartholomew Shower after 1685. Sir Bartholomew was a prominent judge in the Court of King James II. When King James fell from power so did Sir Bartholomew, and he bought the estate to avoid the limelight.

The house had a variety of owners through the 1700s. It was rebuilt about 1780 for Lady Jane Brydges. James Forbes bought and let the house in 1792.

The next major development of the House and Estate took place in 1803, when it was bought by Baker John Sellon as a country residence. He was a barrister with a London practice. He increased the size of the estate considerably and added the middle part of the current building to the 1780 house. This faced East and the façade, window bays, and window surrounds survive to this day. Arthur William Tooke extended it in 1866-7 by adding two wings. These were Victorian in style containing a mixture of medieval and Tudor features. The enormous rose window within a spherical triangle dominates the Kitchen and is a major showpiece of the House today. The Tooke family stayed until the last private owner of the Estate, Samuel Lammas Dore, bought Pinner Hill in 1903 and lived there until 1919. The estate was acquired by Country Garden Estates in 1923, part developed for high-class housing, the rest as a golf course.

The first known sporting activities at Pinner Hill date from 1691 when rates were paid for a bowling alley beside the original House. In 1927 Pinner Hill Golf Club [PHGC] was established and the House became the clubhouse with changing rooms, bars and staff rooms. The outbuildings were adapted for Greenkeepers’ accommodation and working sheds. JH Taylor designed the course and cleared parts of the medieval Pinner Wood to make eighteen holes of suitable lengths. Three holes were commandeered during World War II for the ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign. The WAAF were billeted at PHGC during the War.

In building the course the designers used the ornamental gardens left by the previous owners. These now enhance the ninth and eighteenth green areas. Unusual trees and shrubs were protected such as the mulberry tree on the eighteenth hole. The leaves from this tree were used to feed the silkworms at the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley. The oldest tree on the course is an oak, which has been dated to 1740 making it the second oldest tree in Middlesex and can be found 50 yards below the moat on the left of the fairway. A spectacular sight is afforded from the eighth tee with a panorama that includes Canary Wharf, the London Eye, Harrow Hill and a view of the Thames Valley that stretches to the North Downs.

Pinner Hill Golf Club today boasts more than 700 members drawn mainly from the immediate area. The club's status was recognised in 2001 by the Professional Golfers’ Association when they selected the club as one of only one hundred in the country to receive a commemorative tree. The PGA Oak was planted in October and has a prominent site between the first and tenth holes.

Members of PHGC are aware of the role the golf course plays in the history, of the Pinner Hill estate. Pinner residents can often be seen walking their dogs through the woods or horse riders trekking along the bridal paths; all blending in to the tranquil scene of golfers pursuing their sport.

Acknowledgements:

A History of Pinner Hill House and Estate (available from Ken Kirkman). Pinner Local History Society.

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AGE CONCERN A & E SCHEME HELPS HUNDREDS at HILLINGDON

A new service launched in conjunction with Age Concern in A&E to provide a friend to elderly people who come in alone has been a big success.

The service is designed to lend a helping hand to elderly people who come into A&E alone by offering them friendship, reassurance and practical support. It has already helped hundreds of people in its first three months of existence. It operates seven days a week, 52 weeks a year between the hours of 5pm and 10pm.

Wendy Freeman, of Age Concern Hillingdon, said: ‘Being admitted to an Accident and Emergency department can be very distressing, particularly for older people who are alone. In addition to the illness/accident that they have been admitted for, people can feel disempowered and vulnerable, especially if they do not have a relative or carer with them to see to their practical and emotional needs. This service offers them a ‘friend’ to support them through their time in A&E and beyond.’

Three ‘friends’ are currently employed at Hillingdon Hospital, splitting their shifts throughout the week. In the three weeks since the scheme has been running they have befriended roughly 40 patients each week. Wendy Kuriyan, A&E Consultant at Hillingdon Hospital, said: ‘So far the scheme has been a fantastic success. It’s often the simplest things that make a huge difference to people’s experience of hospital treatment and attending A&E can be nerve-racking with your friends and family around you, let alone without them. Having someone to help you out, get you some food and phone your relatives when you cannot manage to do so for yourself is an invaluable source of comfort, both to the patient and to staff who worry about people who have to attend A&E on their own.’

The ‘friends’ can also accompany patients home when discharged from A&E and set up any equipment with guidance from appropriate staff. In some cases patients may need additional support on leaving hospital. The support workers can offer information and advice on services that may be offered to patients on their return home by Hillingdon Hospital.

If you would like further information on this, or any other Age Concern Hillingdon Service, contact Wendy Freeman on 01895 452669 or email

wfreeman@ageconcernhillingdon.org.uk

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C.P.I. CANINE PARTNERS FOR INDEPENDENCE

In the autumn 2003 edition of the Echo I wrote about this wonderful organisation but, unfortunately, by the time we went to print the telephone number had been changed. I know that several people were interested in contacting the charity so here is the correct contact number – 08456 580480. I won’t repeat the article but I do have an abundance of information if anyone wishes to contact me.

These dogs do as much for physically disabled people as Guide Dogs do for visually impaired people. Just some of the disabilities that a CPI dog can help are Muscular Dystrophy, Multiple Sclerosis, Spina Bifida, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Spinal Injuries, Polio, Stroke and Cerebral Palsy. My contact details are on the front of this newsletter.

Margot Barnikel

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AGE CONCERN HILLINGDON…….WHO ARE WE????

Age Concern Hillingdon is a registered local charity whose aim is to improve the quality of life and promote a positive view of all older people in the borough. We have been established in the borough since 1989 and this year will be celebrating our 15th anniversary.

What services do we provide????

We provide a wide range of services which include a handy person service, helping patients on their return home from hospital (based at either Hillingdon Hospital or Mount Vernon) and advice & information on a wide range of issues which affect the elderly. Our services are free and run by a dedicated team of staff and volunteers. We also publish “The Hillingdon Handbook” which gives invaluable information on services that are available to older people within the borough.

How can you contact us????

Our central office is in Globe House, Bentinick Road, West Drayton, Middlesex. 01895 431331. We also have an information shop in Uxbridge 01895 231841 along with outreach desks at Mount Vernon Hospital and Hillingdon Hospital.

Would you like to help us????

Volunteers are needed throughout the borough to help support our services- to find out more about becoming an Age Concern Hillingdon Volunteer contact Nancy on 01895 431331.

What’s new for 2004????

Coming soon in spring 2004 our new charity shop will be opening in Kingshill Avenue Hayes.

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MOBILE PHONE MASTS

It has been a mixed year in the campaign against phone masts. Win some, lose some.

The largest campaign was against a proposed 80 ft mast in Landers Builders Merchants, Joel Street. This would have been in addition to the 50 ft mast already there. Six residents (including myself) from Joel Street and Norwich Road organised a protest, which resulted in nearly 400 individual letters and a petition of almost 200 signatures objecting to the application. Result? Success! The council rejected the application. My personal thanks to all of those people involved. The second campaign was against a proposed mast in the fields near Gladsdale Drive. A number

of residents in the surrounding area organised letters and a petition objecting to this mast. Result? Success! Congratulations to all those involved. The third campaign (if you can call it that) was against a proposed 40 ft mast on the pavement in Joel Street, approximately 30 yards from the entrance to Landers Builders Merchants. A few people, namely myself, next-door neighbour and a couple of others, wrote letters of objection. Result? Failure! It is now standing in Joel Street, 25 yards away, directly opposite my house.

The only conclusion I can draw from these campaigns is this: ORGANISE TO OPPOSE, and organise quickly – you only have 21 days from the date of the notice to submit your objections. The failed campaign, which was chronologically the first, was not organised; the successful campaigns were organised. It took time and effort, but was worthwhile. Good luck to anyone faced with the same problems in the next year.

Peter Powell, Joel Street

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PHEOS MUSICAL PLAYERS PRESENTS THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

In this entirely new and original production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s dramatic tragedy, Director Clive Bebee (English National Opera, Grim’s Dyke Opera and West End Theatre) recreates the true atmosphere of 16th Century London. Whilst there is the traditional Gilbert humour coupled with Sullivan’s exquisite music, the stark reality of life is exposed to the full in a series of twists and turns, culminating in a breathtaking and unexpected finale.

The production will be staged at the Watersmeet Theatre, Rickmansworth between Tuesday 18th may and Saturday 22nd May at 7.45pm with a Saturday matinee at 2.30pm. Tickets are £12 (concessions £11) but on the opening night 2 tickets may be bought for £20. Tickets may be purchased from the Watersmeet Box Office on 01923 771542 (subject to a £1.50 transacation fee).

We look forward to welcoming you to what promises to be a very special production.

Janet Pearson

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ROUND AND ROUND WE STILL GO!

If you cast your minds back to the last edition of THE HILLS ECHO you will recall the abortive attempt we made to save Joel Street roundabout. The council said it was an accident blackspot but it didn’t even make the top 77 most dangerous sites in Hillingdon! However, despite all our efforts the council were still intent on wasting our money on unnecessary road schemes and work began in October 2003.

SO IS IT ANY BETTER? If you like walking 6 abreast IT’S GREAT! The pavements have been widened to the extent that you can now link arms with 6 or more of your friends and there’s still room for people to pass you going in the opposite direction!

If you like risking your life IT’S GREAT! You can now dash across the Pinner Road opposite the kebab shop to save walking to the crossing outside Somerfield because they have taken the railings down!

WHAT ABOUT THE TRAFFIC? According to various local residents the traffic is as erratic as it always was. Sometimes there is a lot of congestion at peak times and sometimes there isn’t. It seems to be totally random. It always was. One resident who does the school run every day to Haydon School has noticed NO DIFFERENCE AT ALL!

BUT IS IT SAFER? It wasn’t unsafe in the first place as there were only 6 “accidents” in 3 years and no-one at the council could tell me what constituted an accident in the first place.

As far as I can see it’s £76,000 down the drain.

Lynne Halse

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DEVELOPMENTS IN NORTHWOOD HILLS

Plans are being prepared for the installation of a J.C.Decaux Superloo, near Northwood Hills station. The provisional proposals are for the new Superloo to be placed anywhere on the wide pavement in front of the shops, at the top of Joel Street. It is suggested that the best location, might be just south of Northwood Hills tube station, on the eastern side of Joel Street. This new Superloo will be one of six that has been budgeted for by the Council, and there is some degree of flexibility over the strategic location for siting each one. Negotiations are currently going on with London Transport who own the land, to explore the possible use of the site where the disused brick built toilets stand beside the railway bridge, on the west side of Joel Street. It would seem sensible to use the footprint, if the old toilets could be demolished, as all the utilities required are already available. Local residents will be consulted before any decision is made to install a Superloo. As some apprehension over their use has been voiced at recent forums for the elderly, held at the Civic centre, it is hoped to arrange for a presentation by a representative from J.C.Decaux at the next meeting, to explain how USL’s (Universal Superloo) work, in an attempt to remove some of the mystic surrounding their operation. Your local Councillors will keep you fully informed of the progress made.

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NORTHWOOD HEALTH CENTRE

Plans for the proposed new health centre, to be built on the site of the existing health centre north of Pinner Road, have been submitted by the Primary Care Trust, to the planning department at the Civic Centre. The plans have been amended, to address some of the concerns expressed by the planning officer dealing with the application. A full comprehensive report on the application will be prepared, together with the officers recommendation, for determination by a planning committee, which, depending on the timing, may be the new “North” planning committee which is intended to replace the old Constituency planning committees. The new Borough, North and South planning committees come in to operation after the Council A.G.M. on May 13th; and they will meet every three weeks. Your local Councillors will keep you informed on the progress of the new Health Centre planning application.

David Bishop. Councillor.

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LIFE AND A CUP OF TEA

A professor stood before his philosophy class with some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, he picked up a very large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They all agreed that it was.

So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open spaces between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course the sand filled up remaining spaces. He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “yes”.

The professor then produced a cup of tea from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

“Now” said the professor, as the laughter subsided, I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things – your family, your children, your health, your friends, and your passions – things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

“The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else – the small stuff.”

“If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes on for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important and bring a sense of purpose and well being.”

“Take care of the golf balls first, the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

One of the students raised her hands and inquired what the cup of tea represented.

The professor smiled. “I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a cup of tea.”

Would you like to be a golf ball in someone’s life? Could you offer support & friendship to an older person living in Northwood? The Northwood Live at Home Scheme would love to hear from you 01923 842494.

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Issue 02 last updated 29th October 2006