THE HILLS ECHO

Autumn 2005

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

NICK HURD, MP NORTHWOOD & PINNER

NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

DAISY, DAISY

FROM YOUR CHAIRMAN

ICE – IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

FAREWELL and WELCOME

ST. VINCENT’S HOSPITAL – 1939

11 STEPS TO BBQ

NORTHWOOD LIONS CLUB

MIRROR, MIRROR...

TESTING TIMES AHEAD

MEMORIES OF OLD NORTHWOOD

ANOTHER QUIZ

PLANNING REPORT

HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

PETER KITTEL SHORT FILM COMPETITION 2006

NORTHWOOD AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

OUR NORTHWOOD HILLS

ST EDMUND THE KING, NORTHWOOD HILLS

CLASSIC CONCERTS AT ST. EDMUND’S

WHAT’S ON AT ST EDMUND’S 

ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY HARROW AND HILLINGDON BRANCH

MY WARTIME WEDDING

GREAT QUOTES BY GREAT LADIES

PLANNING ENQUIRY SERVICE

NORTHWOOD HILLS - THEN AND NOW

NORTHWOOD LIVE AT HOME

WHAT’S ON AT ST EDMUND’S

LOVERS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

REALLY ?????

NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

SOLILOQUY

FURTHER GREAT QUOTES BY GREAT LADIES

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

The summer of 2005 will be remembered by many of us as the time when Hurricane Katrina caused wide spread disaster in New Orleans, or perhaps the 7/7 suicide bombers in London. To all those people who have been affected by such disasters, our thoughts and prayers go out to you.

Closer to home, the Residents’ Association has been hard at work on many fronts.

 Argyle House – The owners again have applied for permission for change of use, together with an addition of another storey and loss of over 90% of the existing retail premises on the site. The Association opposed the plans, and I am delighted to say, so has our local council.
 Junction of Tolcarne Drive and Joel Street. Earlier this year, we held a demonstration outside the Tesco Express and Esso garage. Whilst it was felt that overall it was a success, as it prompted Tescos’ into actually talking to us, it appears that we may have to take further action, perhaps some of the Residents in Tolcarne Drive can help and support us?
 CCTV. After being promised that CCTV would be installed by the start of the summer holidays, we still await the installation; however, we have been informed that we should have it installed by the end of September. This will involve a number of cameras on the roundabout at Northwood Hills Circus, together with a number of cameras installed along Joel Street.
 Joel Street Farm. I could fill my whole report on this subject, but suffice to say that there is a petition going round, please sign it. If you have not seen one, please contact either Margot or me. On this we do need your help financially and door knocking, again contact either Margot or me.

Have you noticed that, just lately, Northwood Hills is attracting yobs; some live locally, others come from the surrounding area. If you see anything, report it to the police, if it involves a motorcyclist, make a note of the registration number.

On a good point, I would just like to wish all our local businesses, the best of luck, but in particular, the following NEW retail outlets. ActivT a computer shop and Internet, Sea Food Grill and Restaurant, Herbal Lounge, and a florist, all based around Northwood Hills Circus. Value for Money, the Therapy shop in Argyle House, and the Kitchen showroom, all in Joel Street.

Lastly, I would like to thank all the committee members and road stewards for all their hard work

Remember, we need your help! If you would like to get involved in any way please contact Margot or me.

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John Morgan.

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

This is the first Hills Echo for many years that has not been prepared for printing by your Hon. Secretary, Margot Barnikel. This year the Editor has undertaken this responsibility and he asks for your understanding if things are not perfect. He also wishes to thank Margot for the huge amount of work she has nevertheless put into collecting copy, obtaining and preparing advertisements and so on, besides which assembling the publication seems a small thing.

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NICK HURD, MP

Where were you when the Ashes were won? I have to confess to constituents that I pretended to do some paperwork in the corner of an Eastcote pub as we stuttered and then roared to a famous victory. A lot more fun than deciding whom to vote for as the next leader of the Conservative Party. Later that evening, I was in Norwich Road with representatives of your Residents’ Association, collecting signatures in opposition to the proposed development of Joel Street Farm as a cemetery. Above the din of one of those scooters designed to irritate Residents, a lady made an interesting point to me. How can we encourage a greater sense of community when people feel powerless to stop the destruction of the environment they value? Green Space is precious in this part of the world: we should not shrug our shoulders at its irreversible loss. Antisocial behaviour, vandalism and graffiti all drag down a neighbourhood and impose costs on the innocent: we should not tolerate it. For me the key lies in community cohesion, which is why I believe that local communities need to be given more power over the things that really affect their quality of life. Unfortunately the trend seems to be the other way. More and more the country seems to be run by huge, remote and impersonal agencies to which we are all reference numbers rather than individuals.

Much the most rewarding part of my role as your Member of Parliament is the opportunity to shake these bureaucracies down on behalf of constituents who are struggling to get a response, often in situations where they are desperate. I cannot claim universal success – far from it - but I have been pleasantly surprised how much difference the intervention of an MP can make. I would be delighted to hear from you if there is an issue that you want to raise with me. The other part of the job that I enjoy is standing up for the quality of life in Ruislip-Northwood. There are many threats to it. Let me give you just two examples. The ‘blue line’ of police that protect us from crime and antisocial behaviour is too thin in Northwood and needs reinforcing. We have two outstanding local hospitals in Harefield and Mt Vernon but in both cases the Trusts that run them want to move core services away from this area. My job is to make the local case as best I can. Again, please contact me if you have a view on these issues or any others that are bothering you.

On a final note, I should say that this job gives you the chance to meet some interesting people. The other night, I had the chance to celebrate England’s Ashes victory in a unique way – by having dinner with Australia’s Foreign Minister. I was among a group of MPs invited to meet the appropriately named Alex Downer at a dinner at the Australian High Commission in London. The dinner was intended to be a forum to discuss issues of common interest between our two countries, but how often do you get a chance to patronise Australians about sport? I am glad to say that we took it.

Nick Hurd MP represents all those who live in the Ruislip-Northwood constituency, regardless of how they vote. If you want to discuss an issue with Nick, there are several ways of doing it.

House of Commons office: 0207 219 6648,  Northwood Office: 01923 822876
Email : hurdn@parliament.uk  Website: www.nickhurd.com 

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NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

(Now known as the Northwood & Pinner Community Unit)

It is some time since the League of Friends contributed to the newsletter regarding the above hospital; now we are able to bring you up to date with recent events.

As many of you will know the in-patients were transferred on the 28th June 2005 to a new unit at Mount Vernon Hospital (formerly known as Cawthorne Ward) and now to be called Northwood and Pinner Community Unit. Here we have been allocated 24 beds for the care of the elderly and it is staffed by nurses previously employed at the old hospital. The Physiotherapy Department will continue to function at the rear of the Pinner Road Hospital but the Chiropody Clinic has been transferred to the Eastcote Health Centre.

Despite all these changes, the League of Friends is still active and will continue to support the Unit at Mount Vernon. We have already supplied new colourful bedcovers and curtains.

Edith Burton, Hon. Sec. – League of Friends.

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DAISY, DAISY

Daisy, Daisy
Swinging in the breeze
Daffodils, Daffodils
Dancing like trees
Grass, Grass
All bright and Green
tall and Noble
Just like the Queen
Trees, trees
tall and green
Greta, Ceri and Fleur (completed at Hillside After School Club)

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FROM YOUR CHAIRMAN

Imagine for one minute, I am in the process of writing this report in my study, whilst outside my window, if it were not for the trees; I would be looking at the cemetery that backs onto Haste Hill.

The predominant colour in that cemetery has something that we all can relate to – GREEN!

I make no apology for this leads me onto the topic that every resident in Northwood Hills has been talking about; the proposed plans to develop Joel Street Farm into a cemetery. Let me make it clear, the Residents' Association is firmly AGAINST any proposed development of this farm! – Why?

As mentioned at the start of my report, we already have a cemetery in Northwood Hills, which will only develop further up Haste Hill as and when the existing site becomes full. Do we want Northwood Hills to be known as ‘You know Northwood Hills – the place where we bury our dead!’?

Where in this country, can you find a cemetery at the end of the main ‘High Street’ and that the cemetery is NOT for the benefit of the local Residents?

The Residents in Tolcarne Drive, already know how difficult it can be to turn into Joel Street, could you imagine the increased difficulty, if there is a funeral procession of 100+ cars, going to / from the cemetery, - almost impossible. Speak to Residents in Chestnut Avenue, when there is a funeral procession, they have to wait for some time before they make it back to their front door.

 With the 100+ cars, where will they park, yes, the cemetery will have spaces for 50 cars, but what about the other 50 vehicles? Joel Street is already difficult for the Car Driver, Residents and commuters, it will only get worse.

 I have been reminded time and again, from Residents both here in Northwood Hills and in Pinner, that, when they were children, they played by the River Pinn, and that still happens today, do we now have to have ‘NO GO’ Areas in Northwood Hills, because of the fear of possible contamination of the River Pinn?

We have the support of our local Councillors and our new MP who all oppose this development.

Remember, if we don’t speak out loud, the cemetery will be here to stay, with the total loss of the colour GREEN. Let us all speak in one clear voice, ‘The cemetery is NOT wanted, we want Northwood Hills for the Living not the DEAD!

Please join our campaign by signing our petition, writing to the Council Planning Office or attending our MP’s surgery. If you would like to help us by collecting signatures or becoming involved in any other way please contact either Margot or me.

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ICE – IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

In view of the events in London on 7th July, East Anglian Ambulance Service have launched a national “In case of Emergency (ICE)” campaign with the support of Falklands war hero Simon Weston and in association with Vodafone's annual life savers award.

The idea is that you store the word “ICE” in your mobile phone address book, and against it enter the number of the person you would want to be contacted “In Case of Emergency”.

In an emergency situation ambulance and hospital staff will then be able to quickly find out who your next of kin are and be able to contact them. It's so simple that everyone can do it.

For more than one contact name ICE1, ICE2, ICE3 etc.

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FAREWELL and WELCOME

As those of you who attended the A.G.M. in May already know, our President of many years, Roger Pearce, stood down from the post. Roger will be greatly missed, his control of meetings that had the potential of getting severely out of hand has been second to none and he has always been ready and willing to listen to problems and act as mediator.

We wish Frances and Roger great happiness in their new home closer to their family and hope they will remember us kindly.

Alistair Hornal has kindly agreed to follow in Roger’s footsteps as President and we are honoured to have him join us.

Margot Barnikel

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ST. VINCENT’S HOSPITAL – 1939

Let me tell you how I first came to be referred to St. Vincent’s. My own doctor who had performed the first operation in the Northwood Cottage Hospital told me that he could do no more for me and that he would arrange for further specialist help.
It was in 1939, when, at the age of 10, I was taken from the local Cottage Hospital in Northwood by ambulance to St. Vincent’s. I was taken in a wheelchair to the ward, where to my amazement the ward was made up of a back, two sides and a roof! The front was made up of canvas blinds, which were pulled down at night. They made quite a noise during the night if the wind was blowing in the wrong direction!

Within the ward were boys of my own age or older, strapped down on beds in order to try and straighten their bodies. Some of them even walked about in irons – callipers as I discovered they were called – which was a bit frightening because I had never seen anything like that.

That night I was to see someone in white coming towards me in the dark. It turned out to be one of the nuns dressed in her white uniform and high hat. That was pretty scary for a boy of ten years old that still believed in ghosts! In time, I got used to this scene as the nuns patrolled quite regularly.

Shortly after my arrival, I met the Matron who welcomed me to the hospital by saying that they would try and make my stay as happy as possible. This was followed by a meeting with my doctor, whose name was Dr. Snell. The doctor looked at my leg and then asked me how I was. I told him I was a bit frightened, to which he said that the Hospital was here to help me, and that they would do everything within their power to make my stay as pleasant as possible.
I believe that Dr Snell was one of only two surgeons in the Hospital at that time – the other one being Dr Blockman. If only more people were aware of the marvellous work done by these two men, and the fantastic operations they performed – given that technology in those days was nothing like the technology of today. I must also praise the nurses and the nuns for the very efficient way in which the wards were run.

The day of my operation grew nearer and eventually I was moved to another part of the Hospital where I stayed for a few days. Once the operation was over, I moved back to my original ward where I found a party in full swing. It transpired that the party was for one of the boys who was going home. We were all pleased for him, although a little bit sad that we weren’t going home ourselves. When the party was over, I was taken aside by one of the nurses to have my bandages changed. It was at that stage that I saw I had a scar from my knee down to my ankle – which was a bit of a shock, but I was soon to be re-assured by the nurse and my Doctor who told me that he had removed two bits of he bone that had turned septic as a result of the abscess bursting. It was then that I was told that I would be confined to bed for the next four or five months – which in the final event turned out to be eight months! During that time I got to know a lot of the patients within the Hospital, some of who lived miles away from the Hospital and some of who were orphans. I was one of the lucky ones – my family came to see me every day – despite the journey from Hatch End, which in those days was quite a trek!

I saw many things during my time on the ward. One day there were two men walking around with callipers and carrying tools. When I asked the nurse what they were doing, she told me that they were ex-patients who had nowhere to go after their treatment had finished, as they were orphans. The Hospital found them places to live and also trained them in different trades – such as carpenters, bricklayers, painters, metalworker, electricians and shoemakers. The shoemaker was very important to the Hospital because he made most of the surgical shoes that were used at St. Vincent’s and other local Hospitals. They were so busy that they employed two or three men. I learned that there was a farm where quite a few of them worked. They had pigs and cows and grew their own vegetables, which was a great help to the Hospital, as the food bill must have been quite high!
You didn’t have to be a patient to receive excellent service from the staff of St. Vincent’s. My brother came to visit me on Sunday on his motorbike. The bike fell over whilst it was parked, and the petrol tank was pierced. A young man came round the corner and saw that my brother was in trouble. He told my brother that he’d get his tools and help him to repair the damage. He was true to his word – he enlisted the help of another member of staff who went into the town to get petrol. That’s how helpful the staff was at St. Vincent’s.

As you can imagine, after eight months I was thrilled to be told eventually that I could go home. However, I was also very sad to leave my friends at the hospital. When I was discharged, I was advised that I had to attend the hospital as an outpatient for quite some time.

It was not until 1953 that I returned to St. Vincent’s with a lump on the side of my knee. Almost on arrival, I met up again with Dr. Snell. This time, my stay only lasted a few days.

The years rolled on, and it was not until 1966 when I had to go back again. I walked into the Out-Patient Department, and to my amazement Dr Snell was still there. This time my problem was diagnosed as a cyst and he told me he would have to operate to remove it. I had the operation within a matter of days and when Dr Snell came to see me after the operation I complained of a slight numbness in my leg. Dr Snell was always ready with a joke and he told me he’d chopped my leg off and replaced it with a porcelain leg so I shouldn’t experience any more problems!

St. Vincent’s Hospital relied on Charity help in order to function. The Charity was the Church, and the public generally. The Northwood people were very aware of the excellent work performed by St. Vincent’s Hospital and would support them at their ‘Open Days’ and charity events. The voluntary help was excellent. These include ladies that came round to visit patients who had no visitors of their own and also those who taught craftwork. This was extremely useful as spending a lot of time in hospital could be quite boring.

Prior to writing this letter, I visited St. Vincent’s hospital to take some photographs, as I knew it was closing down. What I saw was very sad. It was just a shell of a hospital and not the former glory it was once. At that time there was still some therapy treatment being administered from the hospital, but now even that has gone. I can only feel sad at its demise after all the wonderful treatment I had and wonder if the cost-cutting exercise was worth while.

John Tillyard

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11 STEPS TO BBQ

It's the only type of cooking a real man will do. When a man volunteers to do the BBQ the following chain of events are put into motion:

The woman buys the food.
The woman makes the salad, vegetables, and dessert.
The woman prepares the meat for cooking, places it on a tray along with the necessary cooking utensils and sauces, and takes it to the man who is lounging beside the grill – beer in hand.

Here comes the important part .....

THE MAN PLACES THE MEAT ON THE GRILL.

More routine....

The woman goes inside to organize the plates and cutlery.
The woman comes out to tell the man that the meat is burning. He thanks her and asks if she will bring another beer while he deals with the situation.

Important again ....

THE MAN TAKES THE MEAT OFF THE GRILL AND HANDS IT TO THE WOMAN.

More routine.....

The woman prepares the plates, salad, bread, utensils, napkins, sauces, and brings them to the table.
After eating, the woman clears the table and does the dishes.
And most of all ....
 Everyone PRAISES the man and THANKS him for his cooking efforts.
The man asks the woman how she enjoyed “her night off.” And, upon seeing her annoyed reaction, concludes that there's just no pleasing some women!

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NORTHWOOD LIONS CLUB

By the time you read this, our annual Carnival will probably be a distant memory. We felt that this year, our seventh, we had a really good community spirit, with lovely weather, and as well raised money for our chosen charity - the Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre at Mount Vernon Hospital. Thanks to all of you who came along - we hope you enjoyed the day.
We are now looking forward to our winter programme, which will include our annual Fish and Chip supper for older people who live on their own, and we will hopefully have some fund-raising events too.

If you are interested in the Lions, the services we provide in the community, and the fun that we have, please contact one of us on the numbers below:

Andrew Allen: 0208 863 4626 or Gyl Webb: 01923 829589

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MIRROR, MIRROR... 

Mirror, mirror on the wall
You're not playing fair at all
I'm really now upset with you
For giving your distorted view

You show my hair is turning grey
It's just the way the shadows play
I know that you're not hanging straight
To make me look so over weight

The way you show a double chin
Is just the way the light comes in
I think I'm fine, but you're so wise
To put such accent on my thighs.
I wish you'd try to be my friend
And tell me I'm a little thin
Just tell me I look good in jeans
And frilly shirts and pretty things.

Please don't let the wrinkles show
I'd like to have a pretty glow
I see you won't respond at all
So I'll just tear you off the wall.

Anon

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TESTING TIMES AHEAD

During this autumn, behind the scenes, a team of inspectors who will make a judgement on our CPA rating is inspecting your Council. CPA stands for Corporate Performance Assessment, and every aspect of Hillingdon Council services for Council Tax payers and Residents generally will be assessed and given a rating, which will count towards the final judgement day, February 23rd 2006, when the final result will be announced. The importance of this assessment cannot be under-estimated, as we are determined to improve the services that we as a Council are expected to provide for you the customer. You probably appreciate that the London Borough of Hillingdon has to provide a whole complex range of services from financial management to refuse collection and street cleansing. The ratings we can qualify for range from poor, weak, satisfactory, to good and excellent. Obviously, we aim to become an “excellent” Council, but the qualifications are very challenging and currently we are rated as “weak”, so our sights are clearly focussed on raising the standards of service in every department to meet this objective.

The next six months are going to be exciting and challenging times, particularly for our staff, and hopefully you will have already noticed a distinct improvement in services provided by the Council.

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MEMORIES OF OLD NORTHWOOD

My first memory is coming to live in the High Street in 1922 and going to school at Emmanuel Infants School aged five years old with Miss Ford and Mrs Payne as teachers. At the age of seven we had to move to the Pinner Road School (where the flats are now) opposite Express Dairies Yard.

Going to school in the winter we enjoyed, and if there had been snow during the night, and it was a heavy fall, the shop keepers would sweep the snow into the gutter and it could be about two feet high and we would walk all down the High Street on top of it. Great fun!
The Library in those days was in the Pinner Road School under the supervision of Mr W.A.G. Kemp, who was a local author and one of the Head Teachers at the school until Mr Sainsbury, my headmaster, took over.

I remember the School Dentist, whom we all hated and tried to avoid if possible, as drilling a tooth was done with a foot operated drill – no wonder we were all scared.

Empire Day was always remembered in those days. We would be in our school uniform – navy gymslips, white blouses, white socks and sandals, and we would march along the Pinner Road and feel very proud as we sang ‘I vow to thee my country’, ‘All people that on earth do dwell’ and ‘Jerusalem’ and then salute the Union Jack on the Flag Pole. This took place in the grounds of Northwood Girls College in Maxwell Road.

Shops I remember – Gussie Reed’s shop in Hallowell Road where he sold all the tools of the trade, nails, paraffin etc. The Misses Benjamin who had a small shop down Station Approach by Northwood Station, who sold delicious home made toffee. The various Coal Offices, a Boot and Shoe Repairers were all down by the Station. Freeman Hardy and Willis Shoe Shop, Hudson Brothers and The International were our food stores, also Cullens. Rawlinsons, that sold toys, stationery, cards etc. Ryders, where we used to buy lovely clothes, little coats by Beau Brummel, beautiful material to make our own dresses, drapery and baby clothes, jewellery etc. Also Madam Caroline for dresses, lingerie, stockings etc. Fullers, on the corner of Dene Road, where, as a special treat we would have a cup of coffee and a slice of walnut layer cake. Worboys and Marks the Butchers, Allen and Wilson the two Greengrocers and Hobdells, the sweet shop. MacFisheries for fresh fish and Darvills Music Shop. Elizabeth’s the Bakery and Careys hardware store.

On the corner of Oaklands Gate stood the Post Office. In fact my husband’s father was the first postman in Northwood. He used to walk from Rickmansworth Station to Northwood every day – twice a day – to collect and deliver the post around Northwood. My husband Fred used to tell me tales about Christmas where the other postmen used to gather in the front room in the High Street where he lived and share out their Xmas Box money between them – also a glass of beer which was poured from a quart bottle. The fire would be lit in that room on a special occasion such as this.
My other memories of Northwood are walking along Chester road with my father to the hospital which was situated in Hallowell road, where the Men’s Club is now, and having a cyst removed by Dr Hignett and Dr Hilton. Doctor Ritchie was our doctor at that time.

The Fire Station was in Oaklands Gate when I was a child and I remember Mr Thompson, who worked at Callows Bakery in the High Street, downing his tools and dashing home and dressing himself and swiftly riding his bike up to Northwood where he, like the other volunteers, would don their heavy brass helmets and be off to fight the fire. The worst fire I ever saw was a bungalow in The Drive, Northwood.

Other memories I can recall are taking our tea to the Recreation Ground in Chestnut Avenue and playing on the swings, roundabout, seesaw etc. and the paddling pool on a hot day. There was always an attendant looking out for us within the grounds, which had a lovely rockery, all golden alyssum and mauve aubrietia, it was a picture to behold by the new Pavilion that had been built next to the Tennis Courts in 1930. We used to play hide and seek round the rockery and bushes but never trod on the plants.
Another adventure was having tea with my auntie who lived Hills Lane, and then going along the path and jumping over the stream that ran from one side of the Golf Course to the other, and also picking cowslips which you don’t see anymore as everywhere is altered. Our favourite walks were taken on a Sunday evening, sometimes after Church on a fine evening through the footpath by the Railway line at the back of Rofant Road, Northwood, over the little bridge and following the footpath up to the Olde Green Man Pub on Batchworth Heath where we would sit round the tree and eat cheese sandwich biscuits or a big Aberneathy biscuit bought from the pub with a glass of lemonade or ginger beer. Another walk was down Hills Lane and across the common to the Post Ponds and onto Ruislip reservoir, as it was then called. We used to pick little blue Harebells that grew on the common and Bluebells in the Woods.

The Gravel Pits was another favourite place to play running up and down the slopes. We enjoyed taking our tea up to Gate Hill before all the houses were built. We used to sit on an old tree trunk to eat our sandwiches and then pick violets and cowslips to take home to Mother. Happy Times.

Perhaps this brings back memories to some of you who remember those days!

Marjorie Rackley – née Allen

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ANOTHER QUIZ

Do have a try at it. Yet again the answers are all homes including some belonging to the animal kingdom and buildings (or structures). The number indicates the number of words in the answer.

1 Sounds like you dressed in stockings 
2 Even 
3 A place constructed by Wolsey for a Flower Show? - 2 
4 Good chain of mountains 
5 Over the top in a wire enclosure 
6 Mixtures fail on repeat sowing - 4 
7 Romany fellow and French 
8 Small mountain lake about half five 
9 Some of the contents of Thermos quenches ones thirst 
10 O to be moved with father’s fiddle 
11 Lord’s been captured they say – 2 
12 Board 
13 Multitude on the French railway 
14 Snoop around Spanish River 
15 Seen in a dog approaching from behind 
16 A five sided dwelling at the top perhaps? 
17 Distant rodent swallowed hydrogen 
18 Beatles road? 
19 Last hive chaos in Autumn 
20 In some confusion he lost! 
21 Not out by the sound of it 
22 Fawlty’s in charge in front of a place of worship 
23 Al chap making cube properly – 2 
24 A gravity toilet? 
25 By the sound of it I tripped on tug-boat - 2

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PLANNING REPORT

Joel Street Farmland - I reported on this in our last issue. Since then things have moved on. The Federation of Synagogues has submitted their application and opposition from many Residents has increased. You will read more details elsewhere in this newsletter.

I have written to the Head of Planning at the Civic Centre expressing our objections and I know that many Residents have also written. This proposal is of concern to all our Residents whether they live close to Joel Street or not.

We have several reasons for objecting such as traffic, danger of pollution and the likelihood that property near the site would drop in value. All valid reasons but we believe that the main objection is that our Residents' do not want a cemetery in our residential area and close to our shopping parade. It would dominate our community and certainly be of no benefit to us as exclusively Federation members drawn from a large area of North London would use it.

I believe that a final decision could, to a large extent depend on the feelings of Residents. It is important that Residents who feel strongly about the proposal should give their views. The future of Joel Street Farm Fields could, to a large extent depend on the attitude and concerns of Northwood Hills Residents. Individual letters are important, so may I ask everyone, if you feel strongly about the proposal to write a brief letter to Jean Palmer, Head of Planning & Transportation, Civic Centre, Uxbridge. UB8 1UW.

Argyle House - In my last report I mentioned that the application relating to Argyle House had been withdrawn. Since then, exactly a year later a second application was received. This application was similar to the last one and provides for 53 flats, offices and a Gym / Leisure Centre, with a car park to include a space for each flat at the rear of the building. I wrote expressing concern about the likely loss of retail outlets and inadequate parking provision etc. I also mentioned our grievance that the car park to the rear of Argyle House was once a public car park, which was taken from us without consultation some years ago. It has since transpired that planning permission for ‘change of use’ from public to private use was neither applied for nor given. This is a sore point with us but a lease was signed and nothing can be done. The application was discussed at a recent meeting of the North Planning Committee and the application refused. I do not think that we shall hear any more about Argyle House for some time.

Change of Use - We are still plagued with applications for retail premises to become cafés or ‘take aways’. In the last issue of ‘Hills Echo’ I reported an application to convert ‘Peter the Barbers’ shop into a café by joining it with the empty shop next door, formerly a ladies hairdresser. We objected but the application was approved and Peter the Barber moved to one half of the shop formerly occupied by ‘The Board of Ironing.’ To our surprise we received a copy of a further application to convert the other half of the shop into a café. We objected and await the outcome. A similar application was received for No 44, which already had a sign over the shop ‘Sunshine Café.’ We objected and the application was refused. A similar application has now been made for No. 26. We objected and await the outcome. No doubt there will be more such applications, which we shall continue to oppose. We must retain as much retail as we can in Joel Street.

St Vincent’s Hospital Site – New Nursing Home - I reported in our last issue of the Echo that work on the new nursing home had started. It is still progressing and at the time of writing the roof is under construction. We are hoping that the eastern side of the Wiltshire Road site will be cleared and returned to Green Belt next year.

The Autistic Centre will move to Uxbridge in October and final plans are being prepared for the proposed Nursery School to be built in the grounds of Haydon School. Residents in the Norwich Road area have expressed concern in case the proposed Nursery School will make the traffic situation worse. Traffic in this area is considered to be intolerable but I have been assured that an adequate number of parking spaces and a space for parents ‘dropping off’ and ‘picking up’ their children had been provided. The amount of traffic along Norwich Road should not be increased as it will follow the same route as at present. Also calling times at the Nursery School will vary from the starting and finishing time at Haydon School. We are, of course, very concerned about the traffic problem and are entering into discussions with the school who already have the matter under review.

In the meantime most of the new houses ‘Crest Nicholson’ in Aspen Grove, St. Vincent’s have been sold and many already occupied. I am sure that coupled with the return of Green Belt on the eastern side will make it a very pleasant place to live.
Fish & Grill Restaurant ex Mini Modes – The new restaurant was opened recently and seems to be doing well. An application was made recently to place tables and chairs on the pavement outside the restaurant. The pavement is very wide and we did not object providing that they are carefully sited so as not to inconvenience pedestrians. So if approved customers will have the added pleasure of watching the traffic negotiate the roundabout whilst enjoying their meal. People who have used the restaurant have spoken highly of it and we wish it every success.

Lishman Y. Easby

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HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

Harrow Cine & Video Society’s (Reg. Charity No. 292696) Autumn Movie Show will take place on Thursday 13th October in the Pinner Village Hall, Chapel Lane. Doors open at 7.30pm for 8pm start. Programme will include newsreel of local events filmed during the past twelve months. Tickets at the door £4 to include refreshments. Further information from Heather Lee on 020 8863 7628.

The Society meets in the Canons Room of the Harrow Arts Centre in Hatch End adjacent to Morrisons every Monday evening at 7.45pm from the beginning of September to the middle of May. Visitors welcome.

Aivar Kaulins – Publicity Officer 020 8954 2607

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PETER KITTEL SHORT FILM COMPETITION 2006

The Competition is open to any groups or individuals aged under 19 on 15th January 2006, the closing date.
Entries may be cine film, video, DVD, in almost any format, any length up to 15mins. including titles and credits, on any topic: drama, documentary, film to a record or poem, spoof advert or what you will. You might like to interpret the theme ‘Peer Group Pressure’ or ‘It began as just another ordinary morning, but then….’ But this is not essential; we should be pleased to see whatever inspires you!
Prizes in two sections:

Under 16 16 – 19
1st £50  1st £75
2nd £35  2nd £50 (voucher)
3rd £20  3rd £25

for full details, rules and entry forms, please e-mail heatherlee@onetel.com

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NORTHWOOD AND DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

It is now a number of years since we lost our base, but we seem to have gone from strength to strength. We now have over 260 members taking part in our activities, and there is still room for a few more. Badminton, Bowls, Bridge, Scrabble , Line Dancing Table and Tennis are just a few of the groups we have, and if you feel you would like to join us then please contact Maureen Watkins Hon. Secretary for more information 020 8868 5791

Maureen Watkins

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OUR NORTHWOOD HILLS

Northwood Hills has lots of different animals, like cats, dogs, hamsters, cows, horses and sheep. There is only one vet near me for all these animals. I think more children should go and study to be vets.
I hate the idea of our farm being turned into a graveyard. as you may have seen the posters up somewhere saying “Northwood Hills is a town for the living”. Having a graveyard put in the middle of Joel Street will be horrible and be a waste of space. It will cause traffic, have a high wall and a big car park. There is only one thing left to do SAY NO!
This is our community and if we don’t do something soon Northwood Hills will be a town for the dead.

Fleur Noriego-Constable aged 9

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ST EDMUND THE KING, NORTHWOOD HILLS

Although a parish church of Pinner, St Edmund’s (Vicar : The Rvd Bruce Driver) covers a fair part of Northwood Hills north of the Met. Line. People driving between the roundabout and Pinner Green may not notice the church. Even if they do look they see a somewhat unspectacular exterior. That is a pity because inside is a wealth of fine features, making it well worth a visit.

The architect, and the stained glass maker had a high European ranking for their work. Several professional sculptors’ works are there, and the total collection of features makes it at least comparable to any other local church.

Possibly the best sculpture is ‘The Angel of God’s Presence’ – a twelve foot high angel covered in gold leaf. It commemorates two local young Wrens who died in World War Two. They were Cecilly Benjamin and Phyllis Bacon. There was a tragic loss of life in 1941, when a draft of twenty-two Wrens and one Naval Nursing Sister were on a ship torpedoed on its way to Gibraltar. This is the only memorial that exists to honour all twenty-three who died. The story is told in: Nightmare Convoy by Paul Lund and Harry Ludlam. It is available at the local library. ISBN 0-572-01452-X.

2004 saw the fortieth anniversary of the construction of the second church, replacing the first one built in 1935 (which is now the Church Hall). For this occasion a book was written recording all the church’s features. Part of the book is written as a guide to what may be seen. The book has been digitally printed and contains superb colour pictures of the windows, and the sculptures. There is also a complete collection of biographies, and information about the church and the parish.

The church has a great sense of charm and tranquillity. Why not go along and experience it? Visits are best after Services. See Church notice boards or go to www.saintedmundschurch.org.uk , or for current activities, see the separate article in this issue.

If you are interested in the book mentioned here, please contact Ken Kirkman direct, at 35 Albury Drive, Pinner, Middlesex.  HA5 3RL Tel: 020-8866-9191 or ken.kirkman@btinternet.com

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CLASSIC CONCERTS AT ST. EDMUND’S

Concerts at the Church of St. Edmund the King, Pinner Road, Northwood Hills

3.30pm SUNDAY 2nd OCTOBER 2005 Isabel Beyer and Harvey Dagul
Piano Music for Four Hands
3.30pm SUNDAY 6th NOVEMBER 2005 The Concert Players
with Vivien Banfield - Piano
Brahms Rhapsodies & Clarinet Quintet
3.30pm JANUARY 29th JANUARY 2006 The Caspian String Quartet
with Vivien Banfield - Piano
Mozart Piano Concerto in C
3.30pm SUNDAY 30th APRIL 2006 Vivien Banfield - Piano
Beethoven Piano Sonatas:
Für Theresa and Les Adieux
Tickets for all the above Concerts
£4.00 including refreshments
Box Office: 020 8866 4610

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WHAT’S ON AT ST EDMUND’S 

The Church of St. Edmund the King, Pinner Road, Northwood Hills

SEPTEMBER Sun 25, 11am   Harvest Festival
OCTOBER Sun 2, 10am
Sun 12, 3.30pm
Sat 15, 2.30pm
Sun 19, 10am
Sun 30, 10am
 Feast of St. Francis of Assisi
 Prayer & Praise
 Scouts’ Jumble Sale
 Confirmation
 All Saints’ Day
NOVEMBER Wed 2
Sun 6, 3.30pm 
Sat 12, 11.30am
Sun 13, 10 am
Sun 13, 3.30pm
Sat 19
Sun 27, 10am
Sun 27, 6.30pm
All Souls’ Day: Holy Communion 8am, 10am
Classic Concert
Christmas Bazaar
Remembrance Sunday with Parade
Memorial Service for those who have died
St. Edmund’s Day: Holy Communion 10am, 7pm
Advent Sunday
Handel’s Messiah (excerpts)
DECEMBER Sun 18, 6.30pm
Sat 24,
Sat 24, 4pm
Sat 24, 11.30pm
Thu 25,
Wed 31
9 Lessons & Carols
Christmas Eve
Blessing of the Crib
Midnight Mass
Christmas Day: Holy Communion 8am, 10am 
New Year’s Eve: 5.30pm Meditation & Devotions
JANUARY Sun 8 
Fri 14 - Sat 21
Sun 29, 10am 
Sun 29, 3.30pm
Epiphany
Sleeping Beauty
Candlemas
Classic Concert

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ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY HARROW AND HILLINGDON BRANCH

Templeton Centre

The Alzheimer’s Society arrived in Joel Street in March 2003, very much at the heart of a friendly caring community. After a brief settling-in period, in our new home within the United Reformed Church, we were swiftly able to expand our services to people with dementia and their families and carers. I thought readers might be interested to hear our very positive news.

You will know that we operate a day centre for younger people (under 65 years) with dementia, Monday to Friday, and very soon we are to extend this service and will be open on Saturdays also. We gained extra space when we moved and thus were able to have, for the first time, sufficient office accommodation which has enabled us to operate a local telephone support line service: 01923 829 888. This has enabled many carers and people with dementia to benefit from local information, advice and support.

In January 2004 we opened our first “Templeton café” in the church hall. The café is open every Tuesday between 10.00 a.m. and 1.00 p.m. for Carers and persons with dementia. Carers are welcome alone but we prefer persons with dementia to be accompanied by a friend or relative. Other voluntary charitable organisations visit our café including the specialist nurse teams (Admiral Nurses). Together we are able to offer advice, support and information in a relaxed “café” atmosphere. Dementia can be very socially isolating, our café has quickly become not just an information point but also a source of friendship and fun.

We are also able to offer two monthly support groups for Carers; one in the church hall on the 1st Wednesday of each month between 2.00 and 3.30 p.m., and the other in our centre on the 1st Thursday of each month in the evening between 7.00 and 9.00 pm.

As you can see we are very busy offering a variety of services and we are always ready to welcome new people to our services. We also eagerly wish to meet new volunteers.

Volunteers are the backbone of the Alzheimer’s Society and in order to provide the wealth of services in Harrow and Hillingdon we always need more assistance. Help is required in many ways, for example in our day centre, café or in the office to assist with administration tasks. If you need our help or if you can help us to help others please do give us a call.

Linda Matthews, Branch Manager, Joel Street Northwood Hills, HA6 1NL
Telephone: 01923 823999, Fax: 01923 824329, E-mail Templeton.centre@care4free.net)

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MY WARTIME WEDDING

The day dawned, it was April 14th 1941, Easter Monday. My father was in bed in the front room of our house in Briarwood Drive, Northwood Hills, awaiting an operation at the Cottage Hospital in the Pinner Road; so he was unable to give me away. Uncle Bert, my father’s brother, was asked if he would do me the honour, which he did. My cousin Reg. was Fred’s best man. I had known Fred since I was about three years old, and we played together in our gardens, as he was the boy next door.

I felt very excited on the Big Day, but my Bridesmaid Vera’s sister Eva, who also made my wedding dress, soon calmed any nerves I had. My wedding dress was made of white Cloque, and was used for six weddings, and is still in good condition, although I can’t get into it now. (I am pleased to say they were all Happy Marriages.)

My friend Eva also made the Bridesmaids’ dresses, one in pink taffeta and the other in green, with matching sashes. The material was decorated with little rosebuds, and they both looked very pretty. My Bridesmaids were my cousin Norah and my friend Vera. Another friend, Vera, whose father owned the nursery in Chester Road, prepared the bouquets.

The Day started off well. Mr Peachey, the Manager of the Belton Estates in Northwood Hills, brought his big lorry filled with trestle tables, crockery, glasses, cutlery etc. and all the food, which was made by my mother and her friends. This was then taken up to the Boys Club in Hallowell Road. The tables looked lovely and were decorated with flowers from a friend’s garden, all tulips and daffodils.
We were married in Emmanuel Church by the Reverend Downward, and I can remember his words to this day: “Always be courteous to one another.” I have thought of them often.

After the service we had photos taken in the Church Porch and then went to the reception in Hallowell Road, where there were 100 guests to greet us. We enjoyed the food and the usual speeches and also the small band that played for us. We were sent on our way with lovely memories of a very happy day.

There was no mention of money matters in those days. We knew nothing of the expenses and cost: but all went well on that wondrous day, and I was married to my BOY NEXT DOOR for 56 years: and have two lovely children, four grandsons and five great grandsons. I am greatly blessed and thank God every day.

My dear Fred died in 1997, but God has been good to me and blesses me with many friends and a wonderful family.

Marjorie Rackley

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GREAT QUOTES BY GREAT LADIES

Inside every older lady is a younger lady – wondering what the hell happened.
-Cora Harvey Armstrong

Inside me lives a skinny woman crying to get out. But I can usually shut her up with cookies.
-Helen Hayes (at 73)

I’m not offended by all the dumb blonde jokes because I know I’m not dumb – and I’m also not blonde.
-Dolly Parton

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PLANNING ENQUIRY SERVICE

I am writing to tell you about the extension of the Planning Enquiry service which is being introduced at two local libraries; at Northwood Hills Library in Potter Street, Northwood in the north of the Borough and at Hayes Library, Golden Crescent, Hayes in the southern area.

The drop-in Planning Enquiry service which is presently provided at the 3rd floor Planning Reception in the Civic Centre, is being extended to provide a more local service for Residents who are more remote from Uxbridge town centre.

A Planning Officer will be available to give advice about what needs planning permission, about current planning applications and how people can make comments if they have been notified, and any other planning issues.

This service will be provided at Northwood Hills Library on Tuesday mornings 10.00am until 1.00pm commencing 13th September 2005, and at Hayes Library on Thursday mornings 10.00am until 1.00pm commencing 15th September 2005.

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NORTHWOOD HILLS - THEN AND NOW

I have lived in Northwood Hills all of my life (more than sixty years) and have seen a huge number of changes to the. content of the shopping area during that time. Most of the local shopping areas today include a large number of eating establishments, of all types, and there are currently around twenty in Northwood Hills alone, which makes up almost 25% of the shops currently occupied. Younger Residents in particular will probably be quite unaware of how different the mix of shops in this area was around fifty years ago. At that time, eating out regularly, which has now become a way of life for so many, was probably a rarely enjoyed luxury, and restaurants in this area were few and far between. Dining out was not an option for many at that time, especially as food rationing was not totally abolished until 1954, accounting for the Ministry of Food office still being in Northwood Hills in that year! The only “takeaway” available in those days was from the fish and chip shop, and those premises still provide the same service in 2005, trading under a different name.

It is interesting to compare the type of shops operating in Northwood Hills fifty years ago with those trading today, and I was able to do this with the aid of a local directory for 1954, assisted in part by my own memory of those times. Quite a number of the shops were branches of very large UK operations (e.g. W.H.Smith, Boots, Dewhurst). The lists below show how different our shopping centre was in 1954 from that of today, and in many cases there have of course been other changes of use to various shops in the intervening years, although a number are still used for the same purpose as fifty years ago, but trading under different names. Only Allen Brothers has survived to continue trading under the same name over the last fifty years. There used to be quite a few “half shops”, but most of these have now been converted into one larger area. Empty shops, now commonplace, were hardly ever seen in the 1950s though, whereas there are always quite a few in Northwood Hills today. Changes of use continue to occur, and after compiling my first list of present day shops in May of this year I was forced to make several corrections to that list when producing this article three months later!

In 1954 where Argyle House now stands was green open space with a footpath through the middle leading to York Road and Highland Road, with a small copse in the top left hand corner as one looked from Joel Street. Similarly there were no shops where 83-89 Joel Street now stand, that area being waste ground at the time. The original library in Northwood Hills opened in the early 1950s, and was quite small, covering both Northwood Hills and Northwood, until the new premises on the corner of Potter Street, and at Oaklands Gate were opened some years later.

As many have bemoaned, many amenities are no longer available in Northwood Hills today, although they still exist in other local shopping areas. The absence of a bank in particular, plus for instance a shoe shop and a greengrocer have been commented on exhaustively, but of course the change in shopping patterns in recent years has meant the demise of many small traders, and the “specialist” shops are hard to find these days. It is interesting to note the number of grocers trading in Northwood Hills in 1954, including Sainsbury's, who went on to far bigger things, along with Macfisheries, who were operating as a chain of wet fish shops at that time.

A sample from the “directory” of shops in the two different years discussed in this article follows [Full list is obtainable from the Editor on request]:

YEAR 1954 AUGUST 2005
JOEL STREET (STATION SIDE)
1-3 Northwood Furnishing Co. Niso (seafood bar)
5 J K Neave (ladies’ hairdresser) Sculptures d’Art (gifts)
Agape Haircare (ladies’ hairdresser)
7 Pritchards (bakers)  In-Between (sandwich bar)
9 W H Smith  Mandarin (Chinese restaurant)
11 Bailey’s (sweets and tobacco) Prima news (newsagent)
 13 West End Modes (ladies’ fashions) Value 4 money (general store)
15 Whittle’s (fish and chips) The Kingfisher (fish and chips)
17 Northwood Hills Radio Northwood Law Practice
19 E Gardiner (fishmonger) Mari Masala (Indian restaurant)
21 Fay Kaye (drapers & children’s wear) Northwood Hills Studio (photographer)
Joan Chesney (ladies’ hairdresser) Pet Zone
43 Ronald Montague SHD Hair Design (ladies hair-dresser)
45 Paterson (butchers) Robin Paterson & Son (butchers)
47 The Swiss Chalet (bakers) Domino’s (pizza restaurant)
49 ” Town & Country (betting shop)
51 The Silk Shop (gifts) The William Jolle (PH)
53 Entrance to factory of Waukesha Bearings Ltd offices
55 E Shipton & Co. Ltd
73 Oliver’s (men’s hairdresser) empty (was Peter’s Barber Shop)
Christine (ladies’ hairdresser) empty (was Miracles – ladies’ hairdresser)
75 Degener’s (bakers) Wenzel’s (bakers)
77 Northwood Furnishing Co. Silver Glass Co.
79 Edward’s Barber Shop Peter’s Barber Shop
81 J Holland (shoe repairs) David Graham Associates (accountants)
JOEL STREET (OPPOSITE STATION)
20 Perry’s (newsagent & Post Office) Costcutter (newsagent)
22 J Sainsbury (grocer) Sahib’s Club
26 UK Tea Co. Ltd ((grocers) 8 a.m. (healthcare etc.)
28 Boots the Chemist Ross Pharmacy
30 Home & Colonial Stores (grocers) William Hill (betting shop)
32 Hodge & Parvin (ironmongers) Dallas (chemist)
34 Bata Shoe Shop Hands Free UK (telecommunications)
36 Home Electrics (radio etc.) Pizza on the Hill (restaurant)
38 J H Dewhurst Ltd (butchers) Little & Lampert (pianos)
62 Howard & Manning (Estate Agents) Douglas Banks (Estate Agents)
64 The Joel Gallery (stationers etc.) Cartridge World (printer services)
66 Northwood Hills Hotel “The Northwood Hills”
68 in 1954 there were no shops between Aunchalees (Thai restaurant) here and No. 86

If anyone wishes to contact me about this article, and has any further information on the subject, I shall be most interested to hear from them at 24 Middleton Drive, Pinner, Middlesex HAS 2PG (telephone 020 8866 3343). One query still unresolved from my earlier articles about “Pinner Road School” is the name of the cafe situated at 36 Joel Street (opposite Bata) until the early 1950s - it preceded Home Electrics at those premises. I would be most grateful if someone can recall the name, as several people are interested.

Alan Carter

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NORTHWOOD LIVE AT HOME

The Northwood Live at Home Scheme aims to provide support for those who need help with shopping, transport and so on, to be able to stay in their own homes. It operates under the aegis of the Methodist Homes Care Group. Elizabeth Balfre has been the Scheme Co-ordinator for the last five years, and is now moving on. Lesley Davies, NLAH Scheme Chair, Management Committee wrote in the recent NLHA newsletter:

‘The tombola at the Lions’ Carnival was a great success – we made £387. A big thank you to all who contributed and to those that helped on the day.”

We are all very sad at Elizabeth leaving us, but we send her off with a great big ‘thank you’ for all she has done for the Scheme and our very good wishes for every success in her future activities.

Now, I want to bring you up to date on what is happening regarding replacing Elizabeth. Over the next few weeks we will be advertising, short-listing applications and then interviewing for the post. There will, of course, be a gap between Elizabeth’s departure and the new manager taking over, and I want to reassure you that it will be ‘business as usual’. Belinda will be looking after activities with the help of volunteers, so please contact us as usual.’

Office telephone: 01923 842494 open on Tuesday, Thursday & Friday mornings. Oaklands Gate Library, 12 Oaklands Gate, Northwood. HA6 3AA    northwoodlah@btconnect.com

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WHAT’S ON AT ST EDMUND’S

Wherever you are in England, you’re never very far from a Church of England Church, and Northwood Hills is no exception. The nearest one is just a few hundred yards along the main road from Northwood Hills Circus towards Pinner Green. The Church is dedicated to St. Edmund the King - one of the early English martyrs, who was King of the East Angles from 855 to 869 AD, and was buried at the place now known as Bury St. Edmund’s.

The most important activities at the Church are of course those connected with Christian worship, led by the Vicar, Fr Bruce Driver. These take place throughout the week, and include special celebrations of all Christian festivals. On Sundays, there is a service of Holy Communion at 8.00 a.m., then at 10.00 a.m. there is a Sung Eucharist, with hymns and a full choir, followed by refreshments. Also at 10.00 a.m., there is “Spectrum on Sunday”, which is the Sunday School where young people start their journey in the Christian Faith. There are other services of Holy Communion on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m., Thursdays at 10.00 a.m., and Saturdays at 9.30 a.m., and there is Morning and Evening Prayer every Tuesday to Saturday. There is also a special “After School” service for families. This starts with drinks and biscuits at 3.45 p.m., and is held fortnightly on Tuesdays.

During the Church year there are a number of special festivals and other Holy Days. This autumn these include Harvest Festival on 25th September, the feast of St. Francis on 2nd October, All Saints’ day on 30th October, Remembrance Sunday on 13th November, and the feast of St. Edmund on 19th November. And then on 27th November it’s Advent Sunday, which is the start of preparation for Christmas. And at Christmas time, there is the traditional service of 9 Lessons and Carols on Sunday 18th December, the inspirational Blessing of the Crib service on Christmas Eve, when the Church is packed with large numbers of children witnessing the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, and of course Midnight Mass later in the evening.

There is a very important occasion on Sunday 16th October, when the Bishop of Willesden will come to St. Edmund’s to conduct a service of Confirmation - the service where those who have been preparing to become full members of the Christian faith come to the Bishop to make their commitment, and to receive the Holy Spirit. This is always a very moving occasion - it is living proof of God’s presence in the world.

Other activities include programme of concerts of classical chamber music - “Classic Concerts at St. Edmund’s”. The profits from these concerts are used in part to support arts projects for young people at St. Edmund’s and at local state schools. The full programme of this season’s Concerts is shown elsewhere in this issue.

In January (14th - 21st), there is our annual Pantomime - this year it’s “Sleeping Beauty”. The show is a high point in the local calendar, and has been since its inception in 1965. It is pantomime in the true family tradition, suitable for all ages to enjoy. We nearly always sell out for most of the 9 performances, so make sure you get your tickets early - look out for our posters in Northwood Hills and Pinner for details nearer the time. Or telephone 020 8868 7785 - the Box Office is open from Monday 7th November.

On Saturday 12th November we hold this year’s Christmas Bazaar. A bit early? Well, not compared with most shops. But come and stock up with those special little presents, and bring the children to see Father Christmas in the best grotto this side of Lapland!

There’s something at St. Edmund’s for everyone – there’s a Badminton Club, a Drama Group (Arrow Players), a Flower-arranging Guild, a Painting Group (watercolours), a Women’s Guild, and thriving groups of Rainbows, Brownies, and Cub Scouts. And don’t forget our Saturday Market (10 - 11.15 a.m.). Lots of interesting things to buy, time for a chat and a cup of tea or coffee.
For more details, and to keep up to date, check out www.saintedmundschurch.org.uk, or call in at the Church and pick up a Church magazine - it’s all there!

Mike Godden

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LOVERS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Those who jump off a bridge in Paris are in Seine
A backward poet writes inverse
Practice safe eating – always use condiments
Shotgun wedding – A case of wife or death
A man needs a mistress just to break the monogamy
A hangover is the wrath of grapes
Reading while sunbathing make you well read
When two egotists meet, its an I for an I
A bicycle can’t stand on its own because it is two tired
What’s the definition of a will? (It’s a dead giveaway)
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana
She was engaged to a boyfriend with a wooden leg but broke it off
A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion
It you don’t pay your exorcist, you get repossessed
With her marriage, she got a new name and a dress
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds
The man who fell into an upholstery machine, is fully recovered
You feel stuck with your debt if you can’t budge it
He often broke into song because he couldn’t find the key
Every calendars days are numbered
A lot of money is tainted – It taint yours and it taint mine
A boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat
He had a photographic memory, which was never developed
Those who get too big for their britches will be exposed in the end
Once you have seen one shopping centre you’ve seen a mall
Santa’s helpers are subordinate clauses

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REALLY ?????

The following snippets have all been seen in ‘appropriate places’.
Spotted in a toilet of a London Office
TOILET OUT OF ORDER, PLEASE USE THE FLOOR BELOW.
In a Laundromat
AUTOMATIC WASHING MACHINES: PLEASE REMOVE ALL YOUR CLOTHES WHEN THE LIGHT GOES OUT.
In a London Department Store.
BARGAIN BASEMENT UPSTAIRS.
In an office
WOULD THE PERSON WHO TOOK THE STEP LADDER YESTERDAY PLEASE BRING IT BACK OR FURTHER STEPS WILL BE TAKEN.
In an office
AFTER TEA BREAK STAFF SHOULD EMPTY THE TEAPOT AND STAND UPSIDE DOWN ON THE DRAINING BOARD.
Outside a second-hand shop
WE EXCHANGE ANYTHING – BICYCLES, WASHING MACHINES, ETC. WHY NOT BRING YOUR WIFE ALONG AND GET A WONDERFUL BARGAIN.
Spotted in a Safari Park
ELEPHANTS PLEASE STAY IN YOUR CAR.
Seen during a conference
FOR ANYONE WHO HAS CHILDREN AND DOESN’T KNOW IT, THERE IS A DAY CARE ON THE 1st FLOOR
Notice in a farmer’s field
THE FARMER ALLOWS WALKERS TO CROSS THE FIELD FOR FREE, BUT THE BULL CHARGES.
Message on a leaflet
IF YOU CANNOT READ, THIS LEAFLET WILL TELL YOU HOW TO GET LESSONS.
On a repair shop door
WE CAN REPAIR ANYTHING. PLEASE KNOCK HARD ON THE DOOR THE BELL DOESN’T WORK.

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NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

Northwood Park,Chestnut Avenue, Northwood HA6 1HR. Tel. 01923 827148

After retaining their Premier Division status at the end of the last campaign, Northwood began the current season as members of the Southern League due to the Football Association’s continuing reorganisation of the non-league game.

There were big changes off the field in the summer. Andy Johnson stood down after many successful years as club chairman, overseeing the club’s rapid development from Spartan League minnows to leading members of the Isthmian League. Former Hartlepool United Chief Executive has taken up the reins as chairman, supported by a new look committee.

There has also been a change on the managerial front, Mick Harvey standing down after a difficult start to the season, the club yet to make a decision on his replacement at time of going to press.

Northwood continue to place great emphasis on youth development with teams of all ages wearing the club colours. This commitment to youth football was recognised by the Football Association in 2003 with the prestigious award of Community Club status. The club is always on the lookout for new players, contact Chair of Youth Football, Steve Williams on 0208 428 1533 for further details.

The club function suite is now fully operational & available for private hire, providing an ideal venue for birthday & wedding celebrations, business gatherings & all social events. Bookings can be made through Dee McCarthy on 01923 827148 or email your details to nfc-bookings@ntlworld.com & the club will contact you.

The club is also playing host to Wealdstone of the Ryman Premier Division, the Stones playing all their home games at Chestnut Avenue this season.

So as Northwood set about the challenge of Southern League football the need for volunteers to get involved with the running of the club assumes greater importance. If you can help in anyway don’t hesitate in making contact. If you simply want to support your local team from the terraces you will be assured of a warm welcome. We look forward to seeing you.

Robin Piper

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SOLILOQUY

I am the world’s greatest traveller. I’ve journeyed from pole to pole and all the climes between….. by dogsled, camel and horseback, by every land, sea and air conveyance; even by submarine, dirigible and rocket.

I am the world’s greatest art and portrait gallery. The heroes and heroines of mythology pose within my borders. I portray the greats and near-greats of all times; kings and queens, pharaohs and presidents, princes and princesses, poets and patriots, emperors and explorers, athletes, architects, aviators, artists and adventurers, tribal chieftains, inventors, moguls, musicians and martyrs, dramatists and novelists, shahs, sultans, saints and sinners. Even the vanished forms of the phoenix, dragon, centaur and unicorn appear upon my face.

I am the world’s greatest picture chronicle and miniature encyclopaedia. I map the communities, countries and continents, and reveal views from every strange remote corner of the earth. I depict mountains and valleys; oceans, rivers, lakes, waterfalls, geysers, harbours, bridges and dams; native canoes, sailing ships and modern ocean liners; monuments and statues; castles, cathedrals, churches, missions, mosques, temples and ruins of temples; and every kind of locomotion from automobiles to zeppelins and steamboats to space ships. I delineate all manner of sports, handicrafts, customs, sacred rites and ceremonies; and nearly every variety of bird, animal, fish, fruit and flower.

I frame the horrors of wars, the blessings of peace, the hardships of emigration, the plight of indigence and the blight of famine. I illustrate the adventures of Don Quixote, the fairy tales of childhood and the legends of civilisations. I reflect the symbols of art and culture, natural resources and industry, of trade and commerce, of agriculture and architecture and all human endeavour. I commemorate the expeditions and voyages, the inventions, discoveries and creations that make life worth living.

Millions of men, women and children are fascinated by me. Through my infinite variety they find boundless pleasure, relaxation and enchantment. Yet I am only a postage stamp

Unknown

[Editor’s Note: This piece comes courtesy of Mr Ray Jones, from Rhos-on-Sea, NorthWales, who was inspired to start his own Neighbourhood Watch Newsletter after reading and enjoying The Hills Echo some five years ago when he was visiting his sister, a member of the Residents’ Association. This shows the influence that can be exerted beyond anything originally intended and conceived. We wish Mr Jones and his Newsletter continued success.]

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FURTHER GREAT QUOTES BY GREAT LADIES

I refuse to think of them as chin hairs. I think of them as stray eyebrows.
-Janette Barber
Laugh and the world laughs with you. Cry and you cry with your girlfriends.
-Laurie Kuslansky
My second favorite household chore is ironing. My first being, hitting my head on the top bunk bed until I faint.
-Erma Bombeck
Old age ain’t no place for sissies.
-Bette Davis
A man’s got to do what a man’s got to do. A woman must do what he can’t.
-Rhonda Hansome
The phrase “working mother” is redundant.
-Jane Sellman
Whatever women must do they must do twice as well as men to be thought half as good. Luckily, this is not difficult.
-Charlotte Whitton
Thirty-five is when you finally get your head together and your body starts falling apart.
-Caryn Leschen
I try to take one day at a time – but sometimes several days attack me at once.
-Jennifer Unlimited
If high heels were so wonderful, men would still be wearing them.
-Sue Grafton
Dolly Parton
If high heels were so wonderful, men would still be wearing them.
-Sue Grafton
I’m not going to vacuum ’til Sears makes one you can ride on.
-Roseanne Barr
When women are depressed they either eat or go shopping. Men invade another country..
-Elayne Boosler
Behind every successful man is a surprised woman.
-Maryon Pearson
In politics, if you want anything said, ask a man. If you want anything done, ask a woman.
-Margaret Thatcher
I have yet to hear a man ask for advice on how to combine marriage and a career.
-Gloria Steinem+
I am a marvelous housekeeper. Every time I leave a man, I keep his house.
-Zsa Gabor
Nobody can make you feel inferior without your permission.
-Eleanor Roosevelt!

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Issue 02 last updated 29th October 2006