THE HILLS ECHO

Autumn 2003

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

THE NORTHWOOD CLUB

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

AGE CONCERN IS ON THE MOVE

NORTHWOOD TOWN CRICKET CLUB

M.P.S

ROUND AND ROUND WE GO!! OR DO WE??

MEMORIES OF A 7 YEAR OLD

MEMORIES of SCHOOL DAYS, LONG AGO

TELEPHONE PREFERENCE SERVICE

PLANNING REPORT

EVERYDAY HEROES

TESCO’s – PETROL STATION – TOILETS

PHONE MASTS

NEWS FROM NORTHWOOD UNITED REFORMED CHURCH

NORTHWOOD LIONS

COUNCILLORS SURGERIES ON SATURDAY MORNINGS

MICHAEL SOBELL HOUSE – VOLUNTEER APPEAL

NORTHWOOD & DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

FastForwardGrant - Harlyn School Pond

PINNER ROAD SCHOOL

HILLINGDON COMMUNITY MEDIATION

WEEP FOR THE TRUE LOVERS

THE YEAR AT HAYDON SCHOOL

NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

FAIRFIELD

NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL NHS TRUST VOLUNTARY TRANSPORT SERVICE

CMSS SKILLS CENTRE

NOUNS OF CONGREGATION

HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

HILLINGDON CRIME PREVENTION PANEL

CHANGES TO INVALID CARE ALLOWANCE

GOOD NEWS FOR THE DISABLED

CPI

WEB SITE

LIFT

GOING UNDERGROUND

KEEPING YOU INFORMED

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CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

This is my first report as your new Chairman and Mike is very hard to follow, as he worked strenuously during his term of office. I think many people will know me as I have lived here since my school days and went to Potter Street School when it first opened. That’s right, work it out and you will know how old I am. I also had the shop, ‘Toys & Sports’ in Joel Street for 30 very happy years. Part of my duties is representing you, the residents, on the Police Consultative Committee and the Crime Prevention Panel.

It is with regret that our local petrol station, which has served us for many years has closed and will open in January as Tesco’s and a petrol station, when our same friendly attendants will return.

Lishman Easby, our Planning Officer is dealing with the development plans for the St. Vincent’s site, but there is concern that this redevelopment means that the existing nursery and the St Mary’s Centre for People with Autism or Aspergers Syndrome will need to relocate, which will cause difficulties and distress to many local people.

It is now confirmed that Northwood and Pinner Hospital will go to the Mount Vernon site. The Cottage Hospital building, as we call it, will be a treatment centre and clinics for the elderly.

The C.H.C. (Community Health Council which deals independently between the N.H.S. and the public) finishes at the end of December. P.A.L.S. will help you with hospital complaints. I am on P.A.L.S. and the Stake Holder Group so if I can help, let me know.

Joel Street Farm is let to Joel Street Riding Stables and their horses and cows graze there.

I am enclosing extracts from Hillingdon Crime Prevention Panel as I know most of you are concerned the policing of area and what is being done stop shop keepers selling drinks to under age children. They are also making visits to troubled areas where gangs collect.

I know it’s very early, but the cards and Christmas decorations are in the shops. So I will take this opportunity to wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Betty Walley, Chairman.

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THE NORTHWOOD CLUB

(Formerly known as The Northwood Boys Club)

54, Hallowell Road, Northwood, HA6 1DS - Tel: 019238 24269

President: Fergus Robertson, Leader Tony Horan

The Northwood Club is probably the oldest youth club in Middlesex. It was founded in 1913 by Dr. Douglas Ritchie and Miss Alice Cowan on land donated by Charles Cowan. Originally the club operated out of a collection of huts until, in 1940, the main club house was built. It was grandly called Hallowell Hall! In 1970 the front hall was constructed. The club has always been managed and run by volunteers and funded by the generosity of local residents, aided by grants sought from charitable bodies and trusts. In spite of it’s name, the Boys’ Club has always had a varying female membership. During the 1990’s the number of girls attending and the fine contribution they made to club activities, the running of the club and the growing awareness of gender issues, the club wrestled to find a more suitable name. The "Northwood Club", whilst an uninspiring name, was adopted. Today the club is used by it’s members on one to two nights per week and frequently during the day, when the club leader, Tony Horan, is working there. This option provides youths who are excluded from school and recent leavers without a focus, with the opportunity to pursue hobbies and keep busy. A nursery uses the main hall each day. A Tai Kwan Do club meets on two evenings and Kung Foo/ Chi Gung meets on two other evenings and a ballet school on one evening, all in the main hall. Members use the front hall when other groups are in the main hall. One goal is to increase the number of evenings when the club is open for local youths. Another is to host other specialised activities on other club nights. The club is busy with as many as forty members attending on the main Wednesday night. We currently organise physical activities, pool, snooker table tennis and discussions within the club and, from time to time take members on external activities and residential trips. We intend to resurrect kayaking as a main focus for the development of self esteem next year. This sport, culminating in the 100 Mile Canoe Test, is a great way for young people to push the boundaries of their self-beliefs and sense of stamina.

The main purpose of the club is give young people a focus, develop their sense of worth, socialise and develop them as productive, caring adults. There are many once-young people who, now, recognise the impact the club has had on their lives. There have been many young people, for whom school has been difficult, who have gained massive benefits from active membership of the club.

We need the support of local people, as volunteers and financial contributors to grow the club as really useful, if not vital community service.

Donations can be sent to the club, addressed to Brian Steed, the Treasurer, and parents or anyone else who wishes to contribute, in whatever way, can visit the club on Wednesday after 7pm.

Malcolm Ruddock, Assistant Leader.

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NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

Northwood School are currently putting together a bid for specialist status, that of Business and Enterprise. This would make the second specialist status school in our area (Haydon is a specialist language school). The move will make the pupils in this, and surrounding areas, rather privileged, with choices not available to all.

Those who will benefit from this advance will include:-

Students

The opportunity to learn and to put into practice enterprise skills across the whole curriculum.
An increase in the facilities and resources available to all students.
Preparation for the world of work in the 21st century.

Community

Resources shared with educational partners.
Opportunities to use and take advantage of our expertise and improved facilities.
A centre of excellence to support adult education.

Businesses

Opportunities to work with and help to shape the workforce and managers of the future.
Access to the latest interactive technologies.
Informing a two-way communication process between business and education.

There is a need to raise £50,000 necessary for this bid and the school are appealing for donations to help with this aim. The donation may be conditional and refunded if the bid is unsuccessful or unconditional and used for a similar purpose. It is also possible, and highly desirable, for the school to benefit from Gift Aid associated with any donation, in that tax you have already paid can also be claimed by the school, thereby increasing the gift.

Mrs Ketley, the Headteacher, would be delighted to hear from you. The school telephone number is 01923 836363

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AGE CONCERN IS ON THE MOVE

Age Concern has launched a mobile IT project using specially designed buses touring the UK offering computer and web training to older people. It’s a chance to learn new skills and benefit from opportunities available online, such as shopping or meeting new friends. Call Age Concern on 020 8765 7513

Starting on the 3rd September 2003 is a new service being offered by Age Concern Hillingdon. There will be a ‘Help Desk’ operating from the Children’s Health Room at Northwood Health Centre on the first Wednesday of each month from 2pm – 4pm. It is probably important that this service is used or, I am sure, the old saying of ‘use it or lose it’ will apply.

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NORTHWOOD TOWN CRICKET CLUB

Northwood Town Cricket Club is experiencing a positive stage in its on-going development.

The Club, based in Chestnut Avenue, is an integral part of the community with a thriving Colts Section that caters for all youngsters of all ages. For further information on joining the Colts Section, contact Terry Smyth on 020 8248 7631.

The Senior Section moves from strength to strength with new players joining all the time. Raj Ahluwalia captains the first eleven this season following an unfortunate hockey injury suffered by South African Morné Hoffman. The Senior Section competes in the Hertfordshire League, with the first eleven in Division Three and the second eleven in Division Seven. To join the Senior Section, contact Club Manager Mike Peacock on 0777 1575832.

The Club is also a popular venue for private party hire. The lounge offers cheap rates and a cheap, fully stocked bar and can be used for birthdays, christenings or any excuse for a party! For more information contact Peter Spencer on 01895 64417.

The Club has done much to update its facilities in recent years and boasts a modern environment to play cricket with a fun and relaxed atmosphere. All members, both playing and social, are welcome to join and enjoy the progress being made by Northwood Town Cricket Club.

Gerald Pimm

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M.P.S

Or to give it it’s full name, Mailing Preference Service.

What is it? It’s a non-profit making organisation whose main objective since 1983 has been to encourage good relations between the Direct Mail Industry and the general public.

Well, if like me, you have reached the stage of being heartily fed up with the mountains of unsolicited mail emerging through that small aperture in the front door this is just the organisation to solve a great deal of your problem.

To you, the client, it’s a free service, which is financed by the very direct mail industry that is so annoying. If you think about it firms really don’t want to waste money sending to people who are just going to deposit their literature straight into the bin (recycled I hope).

If you register with the M.P.S., over a period of about 4 months you will see a gradual reduction in the volume of post. After that period you will receive very little post that you haven’t requested. Your name will remain active for five years after which time you need to register.

What it cannot do is stop non-addressed mail or free newspapers and door-dropped leaflets.

There are also two extra services, one is to remove the name of a deceased person from mailing lists and the other is the baby MPS which is a service for parents whose circumstances have changed and who no longer wish to receive baby related mailings.

Contact address is: DMA House, 70 Margaret Street, London W1W 8SS.

Tel. 020 7291 3310 – Fax 020 7323 4226 – email mps@dma.org.uk -Web-site www.mpsonline.org.uk

Margot Barnikel

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ROUND AND ROUND WE GO!! OR DO WE??

By now all of you will probably have heard about the latest scheme which our elected councillors wish to impose upon us. No? Well here it is:

Joel Street roundabout is perhaps the most important junction in Northwood Hills. You can’t avoid it and probably, like myself, go round it several times each day. The plan is to widen the pavements and make all the corners at the junctions more prominent so that cars have a much sharper angle to negotiate. Having looked at the plans it appears that there should still be enough room for two lanes of traffic to access the roundabout from each of the three main arteries (just!) and exit the roundabout in a single lane as it does now.

So why are they doing this??
Well apparently there have been six accidents over the past few years and – I like this one – the traffic planners want to SLOW THE TRAFFIC DOWN!! I don’t know about you but quite frankly I can’t remember the last time I approached the roundabout at 30 mph. There is always some traffic there and at peak times it is simply a CRAWL. The concept is that by making the angles sharper to get onto the roundabout, this will slow down speeding traffic. Well it will certainly make it much more difficult to slip off left from the Pinner Road down Joel Street!

So what else are they going to do?
On the zebra crossing outside Somerfield there are plans for a traffic island. This will give pedestrians a central refuge while crossing the road. Oh, and if you are one of the many people who like myself dash across the road from the kebab restaurant to the north side of the Pinner road and then sidle around the railings into Northwood Way then you’re in luck! The railings are going to be removed and a crossing point consisting of pink bobble-covered pavement will be placed there.

So, whose big idea was this??
Yep, it’s our old friend MIKE HEYWOOD. I expect you remember him. He was the one who came up with the bright idea of having a Controlled Parking Zone in all the streets in Northwood Hills. Cast your minds back to the start of 2003. The residents of our good town fought a massive campaign and WON THE DAY against that bit of lunacy. What shocks me most of all about this scheme is that, according to the Gazette, our roundabout does not even figure in the list of "The Top 77 Most Dangerous Accident Sites in Hillingdon".

If you don’t want this to happen then TAKE ACTION. Write to Mike Heywood at: -

London Borough of Hillingdon, Civic Centre, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 1UW

Send him an e-mail at mheywood@hillingdon.gov.uk) and tell him what you think or e-mail the conservative party at conservativegroup@hillingdon.gov.uk. Send me an e-mail at halselynne@hotmail.com and let me know your views.

This outrageous waste of our taxes is nothing short of criminal. I’ve never been a political animal, but if this is the best that our Conservative council can come up with then maybe it is time for them to go. Oh, did I tell you the cost? Approximately £76,000!

Lynne Halse

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MEMORIES OF A 7 YEAR OLD

Hillside Nursery-
I remember the farm and I was playing with the chicks.
I remember when we fed the kid.
I remember PE when we played with the Paroshoot (parachute)

Reception class-
I remember when it was the morning and I was on the carpet doing a puzzle. I did that every morning.

Year 1
I remember when we did art. We did frames that have lots of things that gardens have got in them.
I remember when we went to the Science Museum and we played with blocks and built a block of flats which was supposed to be fit for a child.

Year 2
I remember when we practiced sports day. I thought I was going to come third in my team games because I didn’t think that I would be good at all the activities, but we came first.

I was ecstatic when I was a spelling star the first time I got all my hard spellings right.

I remember Mrs Alen did art with us she is the best art teacher in the world.

I wish I could stay at Infant school and not move to the Juniors

Fleur Noriego-Constable

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MEMORIES of SCHOOL DAYS, LONG AGO

Walking to Potter Street School for our annual sports day

 Marching round the playground on 24th May (Empire Day), and singing "I Vow To Thee My Country". Still one of my favourites.

 Miss Firman in the last year at Pinner Road made us recite our tables every afternoon. It worked, I remember them now.

 Missing one of the exams for the 11 plus because of illness and taking it later in the out buildings where the dentist used to inspect our teeth, ughh!!!!

 Performing a piano duet with another girl for a school concert. I was petrified.

 Marion Wilson

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TELEPHONE PREFERENCE SERVICE

By request – repeated information

Do you get fed up with telephone sales? Why is it they always seem to phone at dinner-time? If, like me, you are getting more and more irritated and are tending to snap at the sales person, why don’t you register with the Telephone Preference Service, which is designed to stop this infernal nuisance. If any calls do sneak through the words, ‘I don’t think that I should be receiving this call because I’m registered with the Telephone Preference Service’, will soon see them off.

The number to call to register is 08450 700707. Call them now, you don’t even speak to a human, it’s all done by pressing numbers on your phone and giving your details.

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PLANNING REPORT

Proposed Nursing Home – St Vincent’s Hospital Site - These proposals have advanced since my last report. The site set aside for housing development has now been sold and we expect a detailed planning application to be submitted soon. The next step will be to clear the site of hospital buildings, which will include the site on the eastern side of Wiltshire Lane. The clearing of this site was agreed 2 or 3 years ago and included in the conditions of approval. This will provide an open space leading up to Haste Hill and compensate for the loss of green belt when the previous housing estate was built. Under the proposals Wiltshire Lane will terminate just short of the woods and a car park and bus turning point will be provided. This parking area will be available for anyone wishing to visit Ruislip Woods. Over the years I have made visits to St. Vincent’s on behalf of our Association and discussed proposals. We have experienced many disappointments but at last we can expect a satisfactory conclusion. The nursing home will continue the caring spirit of St. Vincent’s and the site clearance retain and improve the country appearance of the area.

Esso /Tesco Proposals – Tolcarne Drive, Joel Street - As you already know the proposal to erect a Tesco Store alongside the Esso filling station has now been approved. This approval was granted by the Planning Inspectorate in Bristol not by Hillingdon Borough Council. In fact the Planning sub-Committee of the Council would have rejected the application but as an appeal had been made to the Inspectorate, on the grounds of non-determination within the prescribed time limit, they had no further jurisdiction over the matter. At the time of the application we wrote to the Head of Planning in the Borough Council expressing concern over the proposals including the possible effect on the viability of our shopping area. This possible effect was also one of the reasons the Council Planning Department used in their decision to reject had they been able. This, and several other objections were put to the Inspectorate but after a lengthy investigation including site visits they concluded that the proposals would not undermine the viability of our shopping area but would provide a useful service for many local residents.

Ryefield Crescent, Joel Street – ex Skip Storage Area-  In the Spring Edition of the Hills Echo I reported an application to erect a warehouse on, what was formerly a site for storing skips in Ryefield Crescent. We did not object but did point out the difficulty of access to the site. This application is still in abeyance but a second application has now been submitted to erect four flats. Once again we did not object but I again reported the difficulty, which would face drivers, either entering or leaving the site. The access to the site is down a narrow private road. There are several businesses along the road and delivery lorries frequently block the road for an hour or more.

Northwood Health Centre, Neal Close-  An outline planning application has been submitted for a proposed three storey Primary Care Centre on the site of the existing Health Centre. There are no details of the proposals at present; these will be submitted in a subsequent application, if and when the outline proposals are approved. The proposal will extend the facilities for health care and no doubt provide additional clinics etc. We believe that this would be highly desirable for our local community and we have supported the proposal. At the same time, however, insisting that adequate parking spaces are made available. The applicants contend that the proposal to transfer the Steven Shackman Practice to Mount Vernon

Hospital will ensure that there will be plenty of spaces. I hope that this might be correct but at present I am unconvinced. It would seem to me that a larger health centre would attract more users. I have, therefore, written to the Head of Planning & Transportation expressing concern. I have also expressed our request that parking should not spill over on to nearby streets to the inconvenience of users and annoyance of residents.

1 – 3 Joel Street - An application has been made for change of use for this large shop so that it could become a restaurant. In accordance with our policy we have objected to the proposed loss of retails premises. We certainly do not want any more restaurants, or similar, in Joel Street. I am pleased to report that the application has been refused by the Planning Department. I welcome their intention to help us to maintain the viability of our shopping parade.

33 Joel Street - We have objected to a proposed change of use for this shop from retail to A2 class, in this case an estate agent. This is at present an empty shop and although an office, particularly an estate agent, is much better than a restaurant, it is still a loss of a retail outlet. It is our policy to do all possible to protect the viability of our area. A further point is that a transfer to A2 could make it available to other financial services, including a betting office.

Templeton Day Centre – United Reform Church, Joel Street- I am sure that you have all read, with great satisfaction, the article in the spring edition of the Hills Echo by Hazel Templeton and also the article by the Rev. Robin Pagan, the Church Minister. These describe the alterations to the United Reform Church to accommodate the Templeton Day Centre. As Planning Officer for our Association I gave the project our full support. I have been very much involved in the St. Vincent’s project reported above but I was both concerned and saddened when I realised that these proposals would necessitate the closure of the Templeton Day Centre on the St. Vincent’s site. It came as a great relief, both to me personally, and also our Committee when the United Reform Church came to the rescue and offered half of the church building as a centre. This now in operation and an open day was held in April. I was away at the time and unable to attend but Mrs Phillips, a church member, showed me around at a later date. It was in full use on the day I called and it was a pleasure to see the clients enjoying themselves in the various activities, which included table tennis. The design of the unit has been well thought out. The church is divided into two separate and independent parts, the front half for the Day Centre and the rear half for the church. There seemed to be ample space in the day centre section with 2 rooms for activities and relaxation. The balcony above serves as an office but also as an observation point for the area below. I also had a look at the church interior. It is much smaller but I understand quite adequate. In fact its reduced size seemed to give a more intimate feeling. We can only be delighted at the satisfactory way things have turned out and pleased that the Templeton Centre, to which we extend a warm welcome, will continue in Northwood Hills. In this I pay tribute Hazel Templeton and helpers and also Robin Pagan and church members, all of whom deserve praise for their co-operation and endeavours in bringing about this ideal solution to a difficult problem. I understand that Robin Pagan has since transferred to another church. We wish him and his wife every happiness and success in their new home and new challenge.

Lishman Y. Easby – Association Planning Officer

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EVERYDAY HEROES

Think of a 21st century hero. Perhaps you have in mind an eminent politician, a footballer or someone who has achieved a great feat of endurance. An extraordinary person. Probably a famous person, too.

Through the media we are inundated by images of fame and fortune from around the world. Much of what is reported is extraordinary and seems, for most of us, unattainable.

We live in a time when fame matters. More young people want to be television presenters than nurses. When they don’t make it, it cannot be surprising that many are left feeling inadequate.

All too soon, we will forget the name of yesterday’s celebrity. The older person though, who first showed us kindness as a child - that name, that face, will be with us till we die. The grandma who taught us to knit, the teacher who taught us to enjoy poetry, the adult who did not laugh as we shared our fears and hopes with them. All are with us in our memories, with us at the very heart of how we live our lives.

Surely these are the real heroes, not superhuman, but very human. Not famous, even for fifteen minutes, but deeply significant to us. These are the people who have shaped our values and made us who we are.

Let us rejoice and celebrate these heroes.

An elderly person I visited last week told me she now felt inadequate and did not want to be a nuisance to anyone. I think, with a little help, we can redress that situation. I am sure you will agree - we all have a right to feel good about ourselves. Who knows how many heroes we have in our midst.

Now you have your opportunity to be a hero!

Join us as a volunteer and realise the joy you can bring ...

The Northwood Live At Home Scheme has been supporting and offering friendship to the elderly over the last five years. At the moment we are desperately in need of car drivers to offer transport and assist people get out to the supermarket and choose their own shopping. If you think you can help in any other way, please pop into our office for an informal chat. You will find us next to the Oaklands Gate Library on Tuesday, Thursday or Friday mornings, or simply ring Elizabeth Balfré, the Co-ordinator on 01923 842494.

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TESCO’s – PETROL STATION – TOILETS

Yes, they do all link together. As we now all know when the Tesco / Petrol Station project went to Appeal, in their wisdom it was granted. The arguing is now behind us and what is left is to look at conditions and practicalities.

We will be attempting to help the people nearby who will be adversely affected during the actual building and possibly by deliveries afterwards.

There is, however, a plus point to come out of this, TOILETS, which are to be open to the public from 6am until midnight.

MORE TOILETS, the plans have yet to be approved but, of course, there will also be public toilets available in the library during opening hours. The moral of this is that if it is a non-library day give yourself time to run down to Tolcarne Drive.

Margot Barnikel

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PHONE MASTS

Have you noticed that mobile phone masts are popping up like mushrooms, all over the place? These masts are a concern for the residents in the areas where they appear, or are planned. Why are people concerned? The most common statement of the Government is that there is no risk to the health of the general population, the emphasis on the word general. It has been clearly stated in public by just about every scientist going that no one can state categorically that there is no risk to health.

The Government commissioned Stewart Report (May 2000) states

‘We conclude therefore that it is not possible at present to say that exposure to RF radiation, even at levels below national guidelines, is totally without potential adverse health effects, and that the gaps in knowledge are sufficient to justify a precautionary approach’.

The Government issued a response to the Stewart Group Report, and, at para 3.7 of that response, they set out that - ‘The Government accepts the conclusions of the risk assessment of mobile phone technology set out in the Stewart Group’s report’

and, at para 4.1 - ‘The Government accepts the recommended precautionary approach advised by the Stewart Group’.

We do not know if mobile phone masts are safe or not, but more and more evidence is being made available that they are not safe. Our MP, John Wilkinson, agrees that ‘the jury is still out’ on this. (It is interesting to note that the US and other European countries stipulate a minimum exclusion zone of 500m from mast sites to the vulnerable.) Concerns over the safety of phone masts can also have an impact on property prices. It is reported that a reduction in property values of up to 25% is not uncommon.

Recently, I have been involved in two campaigns against proposed mobile phone masts, with different results.

The first campaign involved an application, by O2, to erect a 40ft mast on the pavement in Joel Street, about 25 yards from, and opposite, the junction with Norwich Road, very close to Lander Bros Builders Merchants, where there is already a 50 ft Vodaphone mast. Some of the residents in the immediate vicinity in Joel Street and Norwich Road sent letters of objection to the Council. I tried to organise, through posters in local shops, a team of residents in the surrounding area to canvass their neighbours to oppose the application. Not one person answered that call, although many people expressed concern when discussing the proposal in the local shops. As it happened, no amount of objections would have done any good. In 2001, the Government amended the Town and Country Act, to allow the mobile phone companies to instal masts on the pavements, whether the local council agreed or not. Hillingdon Council had a democratically agreed policy not to allow these masts on their land, but the Government’s actions will now force them to change their policy. The application for this phone mast has been approved. Failure!

The second campaign, just a few weeks later, involved an application, by Orange, to erect an 80 ft mast at Lander Bros Builders Merchants, alongside the existing 50 ft mast. This time, the residents organised properly. With the help of the Residents’ Association,

a protest letter was drawn up and six residents of Joel Street and Norwich Road visited as many properties as possible in the surrounding area. In most of the roads canvassed, about 75-80% of the properties were visited, and about 99% of the residents signed a protest letter, 374 in total. Alongside the protest letter, petitions were set up in about six of the shops in Joel Street, resulting in 188 signatures. The letters and petitions were delivered by hand to the Planning Officer concerned, who appeared somewhat stunned by the response. I have since heard from the Planning Officer that she has recommended that the application should be rejected. Success!

(The application still has to go to the Planning Committee, but the Planning Officer can see no reason why her recommendation should be overturned.)

What does this campaign teach us? If you want to object to a planning application, phone mast or not, be organised. You will not have much time; the notification of the planning applications for these phone masts went to very few residents in the surrounding area; we had 21 days from the date on the notification (Friday) to register our objection, which was reduced even further when the council sent out the notification via 2nd class post on the Friday! You will need to act quickly, and it could involve a lot of legwork, the more people involved the less the legwork, but it does work. If you don’t object, and in an organised campaign, you won’t stop anything!

If you are facing a similar problem, contact the Residents’ Association, They can and do help, and I will be pleased to offer advice myself.

A concerned resident – name given to the Editor

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NEWS FROM NORTHWOOD UNITED REFORMED CHURCH

Reverend Dr. Robin Pagan has now left Northwood Hills to take up a new Ministry at the Elephant and Castle. After nearly 10 years, he and Gabrielle will be greatly missed by the members and friends of the Church. However, all activities are continuing and the Sunday service commences at 10.30 each week. Check the Church notice boards for special events.

Forthcoming events include:-

21st September Harvest Festival 10.30

25th October Jumble Sale commencing at 10.00

16th November The morning service, 103.0, will include the ‘Laying up’ of the Colours of the 7th Northwood Scout Troop. All ex-scouts will be wecome and if you are interested in attending / participating, please contact Graham Hinton – 01895 674536.

30th November Advent Workshop 2.00. Come and try your hand at Christmas Crafts. Tea and mince pies will be available, also a sales table. Further details from Margaret Crush 020 8428 1534.

Caroline Orr

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NORTHWOOD LIONS

Yet another Carnival has come and gone. This was the fourth year it has occurred and the second time we have joined forces with Denham Lions Club to organise the event. Whilst the number of people attending was lower than last year we raised just over £2,500 for charity. We would like to thank all those who supported the event and hope you had an enjoyable time

The bulk of the money raised will be used to purchase equipment for the Michael Sobell Hospice. We hope to give further details of the equipment in the local press in the near future. We will be retaining ownership of all equipment purchased in order to control its relocation in the event of the closure of the Mount Vernon Hospital complex. It is an unfortunate fact of life that these conditions have to be considered.

The summer time is the quietest period in the Lionistic year, when we have a change of club officers and review our programmes for the coming year. We have a varied programme of club activities planned, ranging from participation in the Lord Mayor’s Show on 8th November, visits to the theatre, an inter-club quiz competition and a number of tin shakes at Waitrose supermarket.

Our community activities include a barbecue at John’s Court, a Fish and Chip Supper for a number of senior citizens in the Northwood area, taking under-privileged children to Chessington World of Adventure and running Bingo sessions at a local elderly persons home. We are also planning to take a coach load of senior citizens to a party in Harrow, organised by all the clubs in our District.

One of our fund raising events is a Murder Mystery Night to be held at St, Johns Church, Hallowell Road on 1st November at 7.30 p.m. The entrance fee is £8 per person and visitors are welcome. For further information please contact me on 020 8845 4287.

Lion Eric Holland

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COUNCILLORS SURGERIES ON SATURDAY MORNINGS

For an experimental period of six months, the three Northwood Hills Councillors will be holding a one-hour surgery, once a month, on Saturdays in the annexe of Northwood Hills library. One Councillor will be available from 11am to 12noon, and the dates arranged are as follows:- October 25th; November 29th;December N/A; January 31st 2004; February 28th, and March 27th (reserve). For added security, and because the local Police want to engage more closely with the local residents, the first surgery will have a local community Police Officer present; but of course, any member of the public who wishes to conduct a private conversation with their local Councillor, can do so. This is part of the Council’s vision to have more local based consultation, and if it proves popular, your three local Councillors will review the situation, and if attendance has justified a continuation, there will probably be more Saturday morning surgeries.

Cllr. David Bishop

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MICHAEL SOBELL HOUSE – VOLUNTEER APPEAL

Sadly, there are few of us who have not been touched by cancer. It strikes indiscriminately and is a great leveller for us all – rich and poor, young and old, men and women. When cure is impossible, care becomes prominent and places like Michael Sobell House offer this very specialist care. The Northwood based hospice and palliative care unit has a 16-bedded in-patient facility as well as a Day Centre. which is open from Tuesday to Friday.

Volunteers make up a large and essential part of the team at Michael Sobell House, working alongside the paid staff and enhancing the service to patients and their families and friends. The main duty consists of assisting with the distribution of food and drink. Whilst this practical help is invaluable, the listening ear that is offered with the drink adds the really special touch. Often patients and visitors prefer to chat with volunteers, as they see them, with the absence of a uniform, as non-threatening and hopefully the volunteer will have more time to have a chat! We are currently looking to add to our existing team of volunteers helping with breakfast, mid-morning drinks, lunch, afternoon tea, supper and evening drinks. We have various vacancies on different days and even the opportunity for those that can help on a casual basis providing cover for those who are off on holidays etc.

Michael Sobell House can best be described as homely, friendly, relaxed, safe and unthreatening. Consequently, it is vitally important to ensure that those who offer to volunteer will not only be suitable but that they will find the volunteering experience personally rewarding. Therefore, a structured recruitment and selection process is in place to ensure that both potential volunteers and the patients of Michael Sobell House are protected.

If you would like to join the team at Michael Sobell House please contact Jo-Anne Edwards, Voluntary Services Co-ordinator on 01923 844569 or by email at joanne@mshouse.org

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NORTHWOOD & DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

As mentioned by Councillor David Bishop in the Hills Echo, 2002 this Association is still going strong.  We are based in the United Free Church, Northwood Hills, St. Edmund Church, Northwood and Methodist Church, Northwood.

Since leaving Frithwood School in Northwood, we are very pleased to report that our membership is flourishing and even increasing which is very good news.  We now have a Computer Interest Group and a Sunday Singles Group. As those people on their own know only too well,  Sunday can be a very lonely day.  Our latest venture is Line Dancing which will be held on Wednesday morning from l0.00 am to l2.00 noon, commencing on l7th September at the United Reformed Church.  This is open to anyone who is interested, both male and female.  The cost is £3.50 per session. So, it would appear that in spite of all our problems, we are marching forward. Copies of our programme are listed in the libraries , otherwise contact  Maureen Watkins Hon. Secretary  020 8868 5791 if you would like further details.

Maureen Watkins

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FastForwardGrant - Harlyn School Pond

In the spring edition of "The Hills Echo" I wrote an article about an unsuccessful bid for a FastForwardGrant 2002 to refurbish the pond at Harlyn School.

Undeterred, I submitted a further application for the FastForwardGrant 2003 and was advised in July that outline approval had been granted.

The next stage of the process takes place in September 2003 when a Project Officer from the FFG visits me, and the school pond site to confirm that all required criteria are met. If successful, a cheque to the value of £3776.00 should be with the Northwood Hills Residents Association before the end of the year. So, keep your fingers crossed! I did not know that a hole in the ground would cost so much. I should have gone to the wholesalers.

Upon completion, the pupils can then use this area as a focal point to support their environmental studies. The area is already home to bats (I counted twenty in one evening, including the one that flew into my bedroom), frogs, a variety of birds including finches and two species of woodpecker and the usual creepy crawlies, foxes and grey squirrels.

The FastForwardGrant is a programme, which provides small grants to projects that help unemployed people, particularly those who face a number of barriers, move into full time work. This platform will help them develop confidence and new skills in garden maintenance. If you are aware of any body who would benefit from taking part in this project, please contact me on 020 8866 3241 for further details.

The work will last for about 7 days for 2 people. A professional garden designer will be on hand to plan, advise, and manage the project. All tools and protective wear will be provided and can be retained by the volunteers for future use. Fares and refreshments will be provided.

Ray Krystofiak

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PINNER ROAD SCHOOL

Many residents reading this journal attended the old school, which stood in Pinner Road (where Waller Drive now is) for more than sixty-five years from 1910, before closing its doors for the last time in December 1975. Some of the oldest former pupils received all of their schooling at "Pinner Road", which taught children up to the school leaving age (fourteen from 1918) before the senior school in Potter Street opened in January 1934. Thereafter it was a primary school only. I have often heard the school affectionately referred to as "the little school", a very apt description as, for much of its existence, it was never quite large enough to accommodate all of those children eligible to attend it. Many people have told me how much they enjoyed their time at "Pinner Road", and I hope this brief account will tell something of the story of the school. The first "elementary" school in Northwood opened at Holy Trinity in 1863, next to the first parish church established there in 1854. That school still exists today, in much modernised buildings. In those days Northwood was little more than a hamlet, but in 1887 Northwood railway station was built, when the Metropolitan Railway was extended to Rickmansworth. Consequently many new houses were built in the district around that time, and my great-grandparents were one of the first families who lived in Hallowell Road, from 1890. I remember my grandfather telling me of walking to Holy Trinity School from there. The second church in Northwood was Emmanuel, initially in a temporary building, and an infants school (for children to age seven) opened on the same site in 1899, remaining there until it closed down in 1978. However, by the early 1900s it was obvious that much larger school premises were needed to cater for the fast growing population of Northwood. Extending Holy Trinity School was considered, but the County Council decided, in 1908, to buy some local land on which a new school, large enough to teach around three hundred children, would be erected. So the school, officially called "Northwood Council School", but always popularly known as just "Pinner Road", was built for a little under £5000, and opened at the end of August 1910. Initially there were six classrooms, headmaster's room and cloakrooms; all leading off the hall, but by 1914 it became necessary to add two classrooms, to accommodate all of the local children now entitled to attend the school. Two further infants’ classrooms, another cloakroom and a domestic science extension (which later became the staff room) were added in 1929. About two hundred pupils were transferred to the new senior school in Potter Street in 1934, but by now the station at Northwood Hills had opened, and the intensive housing development in this area was well under way. Thus the numbers of eligible pupils continued to grow, although the transfer of a hundred or so to the new Pinner Wood School in 1939 eased the crowded situation somewhat. From January 1934 "Pinner Road" was designated a full junior school, but until the opening of Harlyn Primary School in 1957 it rarely operated as such. The top year of juniors had to be housed at the senior school for most years from 1936, an educationally unsound policy, necessitated by lack of space. These children, completing their primary school education, became the juniors again among much older children, and many have said how little they enjoyed a "very important year of their schooling. Ironically for a year or two around 1961, building extensions at "Potter Street" were not completed, and the top year of juniors retained at "Pinner Road" for an extra year, as there was no room for them at secondary school! During World War II education was severely disrupted, with reduced school hours, and much time was spent in the air-raid shelters at the school, especially in 1940 and 1944, making learning particularly difficult in those years. In 1947 the school leaving age was raised to fifteen, and the top year of juniors returned briefly to the school, but only until April 1949. To accommodate them a two classroom hut was erected in the playground, and the school canteen in the same area opened the same year. However by the early 1950s such were the numbers of pupils that the canteen housed two classes and two other external buildings were converted to classrooms, to use all available space, until the situation was greatly eased when nearly two hundred pupils were transferred to Harlyn Primary School in 1957.

Plans were already in hand to build a new school to replace "Pinner Road", and a plot of land in Northwood Way was acquired in 1947 for this purpose. Although the school was probably considered quite "modern" when it opened in 1910, the toilet blocks were situated in the playground (and not roofed until the 1950s) and often frozen up in the severe winters. There was no electricity in the main building until 1949, and heating was provided for many years by a combination of open fires and radiators, facilities quite unimaginable by today's standards. So it was no great surprise when the doors at "Pinner Road", known as Northwood County Primary School in its latter days, finally closed in December 1975, and everyone transferred to the new Hillside School in Northwood Way.

In those sixty-five years there were only four headmasters; Mr T.F.Fendick (1910-24), Mr A.A.Sainsbury (1924-34), Mr J.C.Green (1934-62) and Mr A.F.Baggs (1962-75). Adding the thirteen years when Mr Fendick was headmaster of Holy Trinity prior to his transfer, and the first seven years at Hillside, when Mr Baggs was headmaster of the junior school, their service totals a most impressive eighty-five years.

Other teachers spent long periods at "Pinner Road" as well. Mrs Fendick, who became a centenarian, also joined from Holy Trinity and retired with her husband in 1924. Mr W.A.G.Kemp, the well-known local writer, whose excellent histories of Northwood and Eastcote are still available in local libraries, was an original member of staff, along with his future wife, and they both stayed until the 1930s. Mr A.A.Durdle, Miss A.K.Allen and Miss E.Snelgrove were all long-serving local teachers, starting at "Pinner Road" before joining the first staff at "Potter Street" for long periods of service there. From my time at the school (1949-54) I recall Miss N.Napthen, Miss V.A.Beckett, Miss E.W.Rudkin and Mr J.H.Jackson, all of whom were on the staff for many years. Miss Beckett produced the Christmas nativity plays performed by the top infants class each year. I am sure that all of the headmasters and those staff I have mentioned will be well remembered, along with many others.

Today only the magnificent horse-chestnut trees, which were planted soon after the school opened, survive to remind us where our old school once proudly stood for so many years, but I am sure many of you out there will have very fond memories of your formative years spent at "the little school".

I am hoping in due course to write a full history of the school, and invite all old pupils to share their memories (of teachers, school dinners, school plays or whatever) with me for this purpose, as I would intend to include some reminiscences in such a book. Everyone who contacts me will be acknowledged, and I would welcome the opportunity to borrow any memorabilia from those days for copying purposes - everything will be properly looked after and returned as soon as possible. As a "starter" for those memories, will someone please settle an old point of discussion between my brother and me by advising me which colours corresponded to the old "house" names of Pinner, Northwood, Eastcote and Ruislip. Please write to me at 24 Middleton Drive, Pinner, Middlesex HA5 2PG with your recollections.

Alan Carter

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HILLINGDON COMMUNITY MEDIATION

Key House, 106, High Street, Yiewsley, Middx. UB7 7BQ – 01895 446611

Mediation is now available to all

As a result of further funding from the Borough, the Community Mediation is now to provide mediation for private residents living in the Borough. This service has, for a considerable time, been available to those living in rented accommodation, but the extended service will reach 99% of the population. Disputes that are dealt with, include issues such as boundaries / communal areas, parking, rubbish, noise and breakdown in communication.

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WEEP FOR THE TRUE LOVERS

Northwood and Northwood Hills do not boast many noble buildings and do not even have much before the 1900s so the loss of any building erected in the 1880s can be termed a tragedy. We are about to see the demolition, or perhaps the conversion, of The True Lovers’ Knot in the Rickmansworth Road and the site turned into we know not what – a block of flats, two or three homes for the upwardly mobile, a restaurant, a terrace of offices, a showroom – probably not another pub. You can certainly take your pick because with councils strapped for funds, the high bidder rules.

There has been a hostelry on the site for many years and records show that the first licence was issued in 1750.Then it was further back from the road and there was a skittle alley. It was rebuilt in the 1880s and that is largely the building we see today. It had a field behind for the horses that were used to pull the cabs shuttling from Northwood Station. There was a pavilion with seating for 150 and a billiard room. It was licensed for music and dancing. For us 21st century suburbanites, it is difficult to think of people coming to Northwood for a day in the country but that is what they did earlier in the last century – the Metropolitan Railway’s publication "A Day in the Country" promoted just this kind of family outing. Pleasures were simpler then and a change of scene from Kilburn to Northwood was something to get excited about – and The True Lovers Knot was an object of discovery and a worthy destination for these day-trippers. Dear John Betjeman!

 I suppose from the 1960s onwards The True Lovers Knot struggled to find a new role for itself. It was on a main road – but not a road for long distance traffic where motorists needed to stop for a break. It was outside the suburban agglomeration and so had no mass of patrons. It failed to find a crowd-pulling theme when themed pubs were all the rage. Strangely enough it had the perfect theme swinging on its sign-board but there was no attempt to capitalise on true love and, truth to tell, it’s a difficult concept for a business to make money from day after day for it only lends itself to special moments but not a long run! So, it became a road house which was beached by social change. And, of course, the bean-counters had no problem in showing that for such a large number of square feet sales were abysmally low. Certainly it tried out new ideas: special menus, children’s play area, quiz nights, karaoke. It had a large conservatory put up. All to no avail. Now everything is in the hands of the developers and the willingness of the council to grant planning permission.

 Go and see it now. It is best viewed from the opposite side of the road and is the kind of building that would look good in a generous landscape as a small country lodge. You either need to come upon it suddenly or see it at the end of a vista rather like the Kew Gardens pagoda. Close up it cannot be called distinguished but it is a landmark and a piece of history. Its two large gables have different black wooden designs fronting them: one with straight slats and the other with curling ones perhaps representing the two sexes – but seemingly apart. The signboard corrects this but I always found it a little too obvious and therefore disappointing with its entwined pink and blue knots – but, nevertheless, it should be given to a local museum and not end up in a skip. Modern art might have made a more interesting stab at representing true love – even with a knot!

With special thanks to an elderly resident and Julie Wakefield of the Local Studies Department at the London Borough of Hillingdon.

 Robert Symes

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THE YEAR AT HAYDON SCHOOL

As many of our neighbours will know, Haydon enjoyed a very productive last academic year. The DfES has renewed the school's Language College status for a further four years. This is excellent news, a testament to the hard work of all students and staff in making the school a leading centre for the teaching of languages. Haydon was also delighted to receive an excellent OFSTED report, and the renewal of the Chartermark for excellence in service

Once again the school was very successful in public examinations. At A and AVCE level the average student scored the equivalent of grades BBC, remembering that grades A-E represent passes at this level. 70% of all grades were A to C, the grades required for entrance to the best universities. There was a 97% pass rate. The school featured again in national league tables, the 184th best comprehensive in the Daily Telegraph and the 161st best in the Guardian. It should be remembered that Haydon has a genuinely comprehensive sixth form, requiring only five grade Cs at GCSE for entry to A level courses. Many schools in the league tables have higher entry requirements, and therefore our results are especially pleasing. GCSE and GNVQ results were excellent. 68% of students achieved 5 A*-C grades. Girls did particularly well, with 74% achieving this level. The school was ranked the 229th best comprehensive school in the Daily Telegraph and the 245th best in the Guardian. This is a considerable achievement, bearing in mind that there are about 3500 secondary schools in the country and that not all schools described in the tables as comprehensive are genuinely so.

Haydon is particularly proud of its links with the community. Here are just a few of

the ways links were established in the last academic year. Drama offers many opportunities for Haydon students to work with the wider community. The Impact Theatre Company put on a performance of Staying in Learning for all Year 11. The major performance of Guys and Dolls was enjoyed not only by students and staff at Haydon, but also by local residents and by visitors from other schools. Year 13 Performance Studies students undertook community projects where they studied the local community and devised performances in mixed art forms: these were performed in venues outside the school. Year 8 and Year 12 students performed for disabled students and students with severe handicaps. Sixth form students have been involved in many community activities. Last year they helped with swimming classes at a local primary school.

The Language College provided its usual wide range of opportunities. The Modern Languages department continue to teach in local primary schools and it organises training in modern language teaching for teachers within the local authority. Parents have been joining students for lessons in French. A show for primary schools was successfully arranged at Haydon. The school is a centre for the teaching of community languages including Portugese, Gujarati and Urdu. Panjabi lessons have been put on for the Metropolitan Police. The school has been training adult education languages staff in the use of ICT and the audio laboratory. The summer school has continued to provide language teaching for talented linguists from eight schools.

Outside organisations have continued to support our Citizenship programme. The Metropolitan Police and the Health Services School Nurse have visited regularly to support the Year 11 programme. The science department is particularly grateful to the National Nature Reserve for allowing Ruislip Woods to be used for Year 12 fieldwork. The Woodland Trust have visited the school to lecture about Ruislip Woods.The Health and Social Care course depends heavily on support form outside organisations. These included midwives, the community nurse, the nursery nurse and an assistant involved in care of the elderly. Students have benefited from conducted visits to Hillingdon Hospital and Tesco. Students have been placed for work experience at a range of institutions including nurseries and homes for elderly people. Thanks go to organisations such as the Development Centre, Connexions, the Michael Sobell House and the Harrow Leisure Centre. Local primary schools continue to visit Haydon to benefit from SuccessMaker, the computer programme designed to help students with basic literacy and numeracy skills.Year 7 students have visited Coteford Infants' School to read stories that they have written for Reception Class students. These are just some examples of Haydon's links with the local community. We should like to thank all the organisations that support the school in many different ways and provide valuable curriculum enrichment for our students.

The school continues to provide large sums for charity. Here a just a few of the charities supported. Street Child Africa received a cheque for £1400, a sum raised in a variety of ways. On Tuesday 24 June former student Fearne Cotton returned to the school to start a balloon race in aid of the National Autistic Society. The launch was well attended as was the question and answer session with the Saturday Show/ Top of the Pops star afterwards. The furthest balloon reached Germany and the race raised £538. Students sometimes give teachers the impression that they think teachers just appear from thin air in the morning and disappear into thin air again after school. Haydon Council proved that even teachers were young once with their Guess Who competition in July. The quiz raised £250 for Cancer Research.

Haydon continues to value the support (and forbearance) of our neighbours, and we appreciate this opportunity to tell you about some aspects in the life of the school.

Peter Woods. Headteacher

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NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

Eleven years after joining the Isthmian League, Northwood find themselves in the Premier Division having won the First Division North Championship last season. During their rise through the Isthmian ranks Northwood have also enjoyed cup success, winning the Associate Members Trophy twice, capturing the Isthmian League Cup for the first time in 2002 and winning the Isthmian Charity Shield last year. Northwood recently received the award of Community Club Status from the Football Association in recognition of the Club’s commitment to youth football in the local area. The club have 23 teams of all age groups playing their football within the confines of Northwood Park. Improvements have been made to the standards in recent years and the club are hoping this will result in many youngsters developing into First Team Players in the future.

 Robin Piper

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WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

When I first came to Northwood Hills, in 1956, one could stroll along the Broadway and notice many names familiar throughout England - Sainsbury’s, Boots, W.H.Smith, Mac Fisheries, Bata, Home & Colonial, and so on, and there were the usual facilities expected of a local community - the cinema, the chip shop, the bakery, the station, the pub - but even then there was something missing; where was the Church of England? Every town and village in England has its Church - where was it in Northwood Hills? Well, it was there, and of course still is, but unlike many places, it’s not right in the middle - but it’s not far away; the Church of St. Edmund the King is about 500 yards from Northwood Hills Circus along the Pinner Road. And because of its position, it is ideally situated to serve both Northwood Hills and Pinner Green.

Autumn is a busy time in the life in the Church - just as with our own lives, everything gets going again after the summer break, so too in the Church there is a renewed energy in both worship and in social and cultural activities.

The most important activities at the Church are of course those connected with Christian worship, lead by the Vicar, Fr. Bruce Driver. These take place throughout the week, and do of course include special celebrations of all Christian festivals. On Sundays, there is a service of Holy Communion at 8.00 a.m., then at 10.00 a.m. there is a Sung Eucharist, with hymns and a full choir, followed by refreshments. Also at 10.00 a.m., there is "Spectrum on Sunday", which is the Sunday School where young people start their journey in the Christian Faith. There are other services of Holy Communion on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m., Thursdays at 10.00 a.m., and Saturdays at 9.30 a.m. There is also Morning and Evening Prayer every Tuesday to Saturday.

During the Church year there are a number of special festivals and other Holy Days. This autumn these include Harvest Festival on 28th September, the feast of St. Francis on 5th October, All Saints’ day on 2nd November, Remembrance Sunday on 9th November, and the feast of St. Edmund on 20th November. And then on 30th November it’s Advent Sunday, which is the start of preparation for Christmas. And at Christmas time, there is the traditional service of 9 Lessons and Carols on Sunday 21st December, the inspirational Blessing of the Crib service on Christmas Eve, when the Church is packed with large numbers of children witnessing the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, and, of course, Midnight Mass later in the evening.

Other activities include programme of concerts of classical chamber music - "Classic Concerts at St. Edmund’s". The profits from these concerts are used in part to support arts projects for young people at St. Edmund’s and at local state schools. This year, in addition to the highly popular annual brass workshops for year 5 pupils at Harlyn, Hillside and Pinner Wood Schools, Classic Concerts helped to funds a visit to Hillside School by the locally born poet Michael Rosen.

The next concert, on Sunday 16th November at 3.30 p.m., will be given by the newly formed Edmund Ensemble - leader Shelley Van Loen, pianist Vivien Banfield. The programme will include two of Elgar’s elegaic chamber works, the String Quartet and the Piano Quintet. Both were products of Elgar’s last great creative period at the end of the First World War.

The annual Mozart concert, on Sunday 1st February at 3.30 p.m., will be an altogether more light-hearted affair. Also to be given by the Edmund Ensemble, the "Hunt" String Quartet and the Piano Concerto in F Major K413 (transcribed for piano and string quartet) are Mozart at his most exuberant.

Also on a musical theme, on Saturday 8th November there will be an Organ recital in the Church.

In January, there is our annual Pantomime - this year it’s "Jack and the Beanstalk". The show is a high point in the local calendar, and has been since its inception in 1965. It is pantomime in the true family tradition, suitable for all ages to enjoy. We nearly always sell out for most of the 9 performances, so make sure you get your tickets early - look out for our posters in Northwood Hills and Pinner for details nearer the time.

On Saturday 15th November we hold this year’s Christmas Fair. A bit early? Well, not compared with most shops. But come and stock up with those special little presents, and bring the children to see Father Christmas in the best grotto this side of Lapland!

There’s something at St. Edmund’s for everyone - there’s a Badminton Club, a Flower-arranging Guild, a Painting Group (watercolours), a Women’s Guild, and thriving groups of Rainbows, Brownies, Beavers, Cubs and Scouts.

For more details, and to keep up to date, check out www.saintedmundschurch.org.uk, or call in at the Church and pick up a Church magazine - it’s all there!

Mike Godden

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FAIRFIELD

Working in the office at Fairfield, as I do, doesn’t bring too many quiet moments! Just occasionally however, someone comes through door exclaiming that they have lived in the area for quite some time and have never known we were there! So, just in case you are one of them, Fairfield is the large building tucked away next to the modern flats (Fairfield Court) down Windsor Close, which is just off Joel Street. It is the home of the local Christian Church and over the last 11 years of the building’s existence, its very good facilities have ensured its happy development in popularity as a meeting centre for a substantial number of local community groups: WEA adult education classes, The Wrens, The Towns Women’s Guild, The Resident’s Association, Cruse Bereavement Counsellors, & Amiguitos (a Spanish-speaking Mums & Toddlers group) are all amongst them.

The main event of the week for a church will always be on Sunday mornings at 10.30am, when around 150 or more of us gather together for our service. Visitors from the immediate neighbourhood and sometimes even from different parts of the world (!) are not uncommon amongst the more familiar crowd, and we enjoy giving them a welcome over coffee afterwards. Our approach to sharing our understanding of Christian faith with others is neither pressurising nor judgmental, but is, we hope, always warm and sincere. We don’t consider ourselves ‘better’ than others, simply those who have discovered the truth of Jesus Christ for ourselves, in knowing forgiveness, and in living with new purpose. My own family have been at Fairfield for 8 years or so, and we could not now imagine being without the support and friendship we experience being a part of its faith community. It’s a large church, so fortnightly house groups, providing a good mix of social activity, bible study and prayer together, are a very good place to get to know people and make real friends.

From babies to young adults, children are a major part of our church life. Sunday morning groups for all ages (0-18) run alongside our weekly services, but there are also games nights, outings, and (just slightly!) more serious groups where youngsters are encouraged to discover the bible for themselves. For many years, a highlight in the year for Primary School aged children has been Fairfield’s ever-popular Easter Holiday Club. It carries a sincere Christian message in its theme, but is also looked forward to by many of us as a great chance to get creative, let our hair down and be children ourselves for a few days! Tiddlywinks (Parent & Toddlers), known to many local people whose children have passed through, continues to thrive. ‘Mostly Mums’ meet every Friday morning (with a crèche) and our Friday morning Coffee Shop is an absolute must if your passion is home-made cakes. If it helps, you can earn the right to indulge at Keep Fit the previous day!

A somewhat older generation enjoy the monthly programme of ‘Monday Night at Eight’ with a variety of visiting speakers on a wide range of fascinating topics, and a weekly meeting of the Wednesday fellowship offers a welcome in Christian Fellowship to those who would like to come. Regular Sunday Lunches are enjoyed by friends who might otherwise eat alone - or just those who like to come anyway! The men, too, get together for various activities, including table tennis & football.

Fairfield has a Ramblers Club as well, and if you enjoy walking you’ll be welcome. Details for any of these events can be picked up from the Fairfield Office (9am-4pm weekdays)

From early October, some of us are teaming up with our Minister, Roger Pearce, in running a ‘Christianity Explored’ course. These promise to be relaxed, enjoyable, interesting evenings that simply live up to their title. Wednesdays, 7.30pm with supper, video & informal discussion. It may not be too late to join in, so do phone us in the office if you’d like to know about it - even if you can’t manage every week. 01923 827198. Or just come and visit us sometime!

Sue Carey

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NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

The ongoing uncertainty regarding the hospital and its future has, we hope, been finally resolved.

Although it will take time before the proposal is carried out, it is, that Northwood and Pinner Community Hospital be relocated to the Mount Vernon site as a separate unit carrying the Northwood and Pinner name.

There is little doubt that irrespective of the care given, the facilities at Northwood and Pinner do have limitations. The move will mean that our patients will have on site access to the modern facilities at Mount Vernon but, importantly, still have the nursing care synonymous with the present hospital.

The Northwood and Pinner building will continue to be part of the overall plans of the Hillingdon Primary Care Trust, probably as a form of Day Centre.

The Friends continue to support the hospital as we have done in the past.

Frank Armour – Chairman

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THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL NHS TRUST VOLUNTARY TRANSPORT SERVICE

This voluntary service was originally introduced at Mount Vernon Hospital in 1984, providing a transport service for local people who may have difficulty getting to and from hospital to attend out-patient appointments or admissions. There is no charge for this service. This is not an ambulance service, but dependant upon out team of volunteers who give their time freely. The Following Hospitals local to Hillingdon are covered by this service: -

The Hillingdon Hospital - Mount Vernon Hospital - Watford General Hospital
3 days notice is normally required. If you would like to arrange a journey to any of the Hospitals or services mentioned above.

Please Telephone 01923 844356 during 10 am - 3.30pm, Monday to Friday, having the details ready of which Hospital you need to visit, the day and time of your appointment, as well as your name, address and contact telephone number.

Of course, the other side of the coin is that we are always looking for drivers. Your petrol costs are reimbursed. If you have any spare time, please call Tina Dinch on 01895 279856 or 01923 844264.

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CMSS SKILLS CENTRE

CMSS is an independent well-established registered charity in Northwood Hills, working with Disabled adults aged between 18 and 75. Primarily, we provide a day facility offering a holistic service package for each service-user, taking into consideration their individual social, cultural, educational, physical, emotional, and sexual needs. The Day Centre is very much 'Client led' and we offer a huge range of activities during the day as well as social events that can take place at week-ends, evenings out and holidays.

We involve the local community through fund-raising events, such as the annual Jamboree, offering voluntary work and placements for work experience from local schools. We also take nurses and speech therapy students from college on short-term placements at the Centre.

A recent project has been a mobility improvement group for people with Parkinson's disease; this has proven to be very popular. We welcome involvement from a cross section of society as part of our equality beliefs. Ultimately, the Centre provides a care package that is not only interesting, but also beneficial to all who attend. Education and Life Skills alongside social activities provide the Clients with an all round programme to enhance their lives in a direction of their choice.

If you would like to know more about the Centre, perhaps become a volunteer or just help out with social activities, please give us a ring on 020 8866 3711 and speak to Marlene Kelly or Lottie Tork-Judge, we would be delighted to hear from you. We also have a web-site www.skillsdevelopmentcentre.co.uk you can visit.

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NOUNS OF CONGREGATION

There are collective names for many groups which live in societies or come together during the breeding season, at feeding places or when migrating. Try these

Badgers, Racing Horses, Chicks, Snakes

Cattle, Sparrows, Ants, Porpoises

Wolves, Gnats, Bees, Frogs

Otters, Cockles, Eagles, Cats

Oxen, Nightingales, Goats, Rabbits

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HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

Harrow Cine & Video Society’s Autumn Movie Show will take place on Wednesday, October the 29th at the Pinner Village Hall, Chapel Lane, Pinner. Doors open at 7.30pm for an 8pm start. Tickets at the door will be £3.50 which includes interval refreshments. The programme will include newsreel of local events filmed during the past 12 months.

The Society meets from September to May on Monday evenings at 7.45pm in the Canons Room of the Harrow Arts Centre in Uxbridge Road, Hatch End. Visitors and new members are always welcome, and do not need to be active movie-makers to enjoy the facilities of the Society. For further information, contact the Hon. Secretary Heather Lee on 020 8863 7628.

Alvar Kaulins – Publicity Officer

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

Surgeries are now held at the Methodist Church at Oaklands Gate, Northwood, (beside the Nat. West. Bank) in the Oasis Lounge on the third Tuesday of each month excepting August starting at 8.15pm. Local Councillors will always be in attendance.

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HILLINGDON CRIME PREVENTION PANEL

Extract 1- Police Community Support Officers
Nine officers arrived in Hillingdon on 30th June, after completing their three-week initial training. The PCSOs then took part in a two-week Street Duties course in the Borough to develop their skills and local knowledge. The officers now patrol alongside community officers under the command of the three Sector inspectors. They are encouraged to make their own community contacts and familiarise themselves with the residents of the Borough. A further 9 are expected on 29th September and, by April 2004 a total of 41 will have joined the Borough.

Extract 2 – Operation Cleansweep
Commenced on 21st July for three weeks. Hillingdon police officers and PCSOs worked closely with local Authority personnel, British Transport Police and the local Fire Brigade on Operation Cleansweep. This operation targeted anti-social behaviour hot-spots across the Borough with the intention of arresting and deterring offenders; reducing opportunities for anti-social behaviour and providing lasting solutions to community problems.

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CHANGES TO INVALID CARE ALLOWANCE

There are two main changes, which came into effect at the end of last year.

ICA will be paid for the first eight weeks after the person you look after dies.
Carers aged over 65 years can claim ICA for the first time.

However all the other ICA rules have to be heeded. For example if you earn more than £75 per week ICA will stop. The over 65 years payment won’t affect many people because it will only be paid if your retirement pension is less than ICA, in which case it will be ‘topped up’ to the ICA level.

Margot Barnikel

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GOOD NEWS for the DISABLED

Five organisations, who, in their own right, do excellent work for the disabled have combined their resources under the ‘Enabling Partnership’ umbrella.

RADAR (Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation), NIF (National Information Forum), HOLIDAY CARE, ENHAM and SHOPMOBILITY have decided that they can achieve more by working together and, incidentally, save money.

By working together, they are able to pool resources. For example, instead of having five Communications, Human Resources, Finance and IT departments, they now have just one of each acting as an engine room for the whole organisation. This allows each individual charity to concentrate on what it’s best at, whether it’s helping to secure worthwhile employment, influencing legislation, making town centres accessible, or providing information. In short, doing everything possible to serve the needs, and wants, of disabled people at the least possible cost.

Contact address is:- Enabling Partnership, 12 City Forum, 250 City Road, London EC1V 8AF.

Margot Barnikel

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CPI – (CANINE PARTNERS FOR INDEPENDENCE)

When I think of a dog that helps people I automatically think of a Guide Dog for the Blind. Getting to know about CPI made me realise that there are dogs that do so much more. CPI is a small charity, which is totally reliant upon public gifts and donations, and receives no government support. Training a dog takes 18 months and costs around £5,000.

Golden Retrievers and Labradors are the usual breed of dog used as they have a desire to carry things, are friendly to people and are calm in nature.

A puppy is first selected for it’s temperament and then placed with a ‘puppy walker’ for about twelve months. During this period ‘walkers’ are asked to bring the puppy to weekly training classes. CPI provide the puppy and equipment, the ‘walker’ provides the early love, care and time. After this the puppy moves on to advanced training and lastly to a two week residential training course with its new partner, because that’s just what they will become, a partner.

These are just a few of the things that CPI dogs can do. Open and shut doors, switch on and off lights, and draw the curtains. Call a lift and press the pedestrian crossing button. Pick up items (remote control, purse, keys, newspaper, post, etc.) Empty the washing machine and fetch named items like the mobile phone. They can pick selected items from the supermarket shelves, put them in a basket and pass the purse to the cashier. They can also assist with a transaction at the bank, building society or Post Office. The are also able to help with some undressing, such as jackets, gloves, hats and socks.

This Ian’s story. Ian was just 19 when he was paralysed from the neck down after he dived into a swimming pool and broke his neck. At first he reckoned that his life was finished but his CPI dog Alex changed all that. ‘I feel I have been born all over again’, said Ian. There is laughter in his life once more.

Alex helps Ian with many daily tasks like picking up dropped items, drawing the curtains, switching the lights on and off, and pressing the button to call a lift. He open and shuts doors, and collects and pays for the shopping in the supermarket.

Previously Ian had been nervous about going out on his own but now he loves nothing more than taking Alex for a run in the park and into the pub where Alex pays for the drinks.

As Ian says, ‘A CPI dog will change you life. You don’t have to wait. You don’t have to ask. You don’t have to put on family, friends or Joe Public. It is incredible being able to make so many simple decisions when you want to. On top of all that you have a loving companion 24 hours a day. He gives you and those around you peace of mind, security and confidence.

If you would like to know more about these wonderful animals the telephone contact is 01705 450156

Margot Barnikel

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WEB SITE

Don’t forget to look at our web-site from time to time, it is updated regularly and we would welcome suggestions about content. If you have any contributions or comments please contact Ray Krystofiak on 020 8866 3241 who will be pleased to hear from you     www.northwoodhills.co.uk

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LIFT

What is it, you may well ask. I certainly did.

LIFT stands for Local Improvement Finance Trust and is a new idea bringing the public and private sectors together to build and refurbish NHS primary and community premises.

The aim is to have a one-stop centre allowing you, the visitor, to have access to a range of health and social care services, as well as available space for community groups to use, all from one local point.

A range of health & social care providers including GPs, pharmacists, social services and hospital services will occupy space in these new premises.

It is a long-term project expected to cover the next 25 years or so, and the local vision is for a modern, patient centred service, delivered as close to your home as possible.

A Private Sector Partner is currently being chosen and it is expected that building work will start on the first projects in Spring 2004.

Northwood Primary Care Centre
With more services being offered in general practice, the GPs and the supporting community staff who provide care to a populations of approximately 20,000 in and around Northwood, are not able to provide the standard of care they would wish, due to the cramped conditions within the Health Centre.

The new Primary Care Centre will provide for this standard of care. The services available cover general medical care through to minor surgery. Also on site are community dental services, midwifery, social services and voluntary support.

By providing these services locally, patients will not always need to go to Hillingdon Hospital for elements of the care they currently receive.

Email - Lift@harrowpct.nhs.uk web-site – www.bhhlift.com  Tel: 020 8861 8840

Information from Edition 1 of the LIFT newsletter- Margot Barnikel

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GOING UNDERGROUND

You may also recall in my article on local chalk mines that we were excavating a disused shaft in the Oxhey area. Lots of hard work, 28 cubic metres of spoil, and at a depth of 17 metres, we finally reached the bottom of the mine. We have so far explored over 140 metres of tunnels and hope to find even more as we continue to dig through a roof fall. There is no evidence of dates left on the walls, as discovered in similar workings, but we think that the mine was last used in the mid 1800s.

Ken Kirkman, a member of the Pinner Local History Society, gave an interesting talk and slide show on local chalk mines at the Pinner Hall in early September. Look out for details in your local library.

Ray Krystofiak

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KEEPING YOU INFORMED

We are very aware of our inadequacies in keeping you informed about current issues affecting Northwood Hills, with only two newsletters issued per year. It has been suggested, that it would partly solve this problem, if we created an email group (or several) to inform residents of any urgent issues. If you wish to avail yourself of this service please email me with your name, address and email address. Obviously, this wouldn’t reach all residents but we feel that as more and more families are now on-line it is worth trying.   MargotBarnikel@aol.com

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Issue 02 last updated 29th October 2006