THE HILLS ECHO

Autumn 2002

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

A YEAR AT HAYDON SCHOOL

FRIENDS OF NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

NORTHWOOD LIONS

ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY

AARON POND

CHILD SAFETY

TELEPHONE PREFERENCE SERVICE

THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL NHS TRUST VOLUNTARY TRANSPORT SERVICE

MOUNT VERNON MINOR INJURIES UNIT

PLANNING OFFICERS REPORT

TUBE TRAVELLING FOR THE DISABLED

ON-LINE

HELP FOR PEOPLE WITH M.S.

HARLYN PRIMARY SCHOOL

OUR GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS

JUNK MAIL

TURN THEM OFF

BANKING CHANGE

WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

MEALS ON WHEELS

PARKS PATROL

NORTHWOOD JUNIOR SCHOOL REUNION

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

BOTTLE SCHEME

HILLINGDON POLICE COMMUNITY ADVICE LINE

LOCAL POLICING

NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

PROGRESS

NORTHWOOD LIVE AT HOME

HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

WEB SITE

MEMORIES OF HALF MILE LANE + NORTHWOOD>

FAMILY HOLIDAYS

NEW HOURS FOR EASTCOTE LIBRARY

WAR MEMORIES OF ONE OF OUR ROAD STEWARDS

A GIFT OR A MEMORY

BEREAVEMENT REGISTER

LADIES TAKE NOTE – MEN'S RULES

CRIMESTOPPERS

SHOPMOBILITY

ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

YOUR RIGHT TO WANDER in ENGLAND

QUEEN’S JUBILEE

1902 - 2002

NORTHWOOD & DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

CONSERVATION / ENVIRONMENTAL

PUBLIC TOILETS

HILLINGDON HOSPITAL CAR PARK CHARGES

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

JUNE 1861

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

Many matters are currently being dealt with and occupying much of my time. N.H.S. problems locally and policing, or rather the lack of it, and what is new to our locality, allegations of Racial Disharmony.

However, to start my report to you I must say thanks to the good number of you who turned out and attended our A.G.M. in May. Over a hundred members came to the meeting at Fairfield, and what a lively meeting we had. Our Guest Speaker was the Commander of the Hillingdon Division of the Metropolitan Police, Chief Superintendent Andrew Bamber, who gave a detailed view of his aspirations and forthcoming actions for Hillingdon in general. He promised to return, if requested, next year and answer the problems of the past year and whether or not actions have lived up to his projections. I hope he will be just as open to us, members of the community, as he has promised. I, as Chairman, was strongly questioned by members of the audience, regarding the policy we had taken over the application for the ‘Esso’ service station to become a ‘Tesco Metro’ shop and petrol point. The Association Committee took a majority decision not to oppose the application, but to communicate our strong concerns to the Planning Committee of Hillingdon Council, including siting, landscaping and overall size of the proposed redevelopment. It would appear that the planning committee and officers, agreed with our submissions and the application was not approved. Current position is that the applicants have appealed to Government Planning Inspectors and we await that result.

I made comment that I believed that our commercial members of this association and shopkeepers in Northwood Hills should join together and resurrect the local Chamber of Trade. I had, prior to the A.G.M, written a letter, that was hand delivered to all shops, that they should consider their position respecting membership of a Chamber of Trade. Such a body would carry weight when representing their views to the Council and other bodies. I encouraged the shopkeepers to attend our A.G.M. However, I believe only two attended, I was, and am, very disappointed by the lack of response.

I am further disappointed by the lack of response this community has received from our local police. We still have only ‘ONE’ officer, actually designated as our officer to patrol and contact local people. Strenuous efforts have been made to gain a better and more viable unity of policing in Northwood Hills. Lack of manpower has been the main excuse from Uxbridge H.Q. but this is an excuse that is slowly dying because Hillingdon Division has received some 60 odd officers to augment the officers already here. I am told that efforts to use a mobile police station, in our area, has produced problems such as lack of drivers and agreement with the Council to park it on roads. I think that Senior Police Management should get a grip of such things and sort it out. The system, apparently, works in the South of Hillingdon, why can’t it work in the North?

I am told that we have just experienced our first local major racial incidents. A local family, of Indian descent, have had windows broken by a large piece of stone, and paint-like substance sprayed or thrown at the front of their house. Police and Hillingdon Council Officials are currently investigating and we hope that the perpetrators are speedily caught and dealt with. Racial intolerance is something we must all work together to stamp out. This Association is here to help and assist all residents within our area. I would hope that any person experiencing problems of this nature would communicate with us as soon as a problem arises. Do not wait and hope matters will get better. As a community association we can alert the authorities and other relevant bodies and get action.

I regret to say that decisions regarding Northwood Health Centre and the Cottage Hospital are in the future and certainly not within our sphere of knowledge. I understand that it is being proposed that the G.P.s at the Health Centre be allowed to buy the ground and building, from the Hillingdon N.H.S. Primary Care Trust and then have a new building erected with better facilities. Plans are not available to the public. I have deep reservations about selling off N.H.S. facilities, but it would appear that I am a lone voice, not many people seem to agree with me. I think N.H.S properties should be redeveloped by the N.H.S. and that means Government money. We await news.

I must appeal, yet again, for members to take a more active participation in our affairs. We need more road stewards to deliver this ‘Echo’ magazine, collect subscriptions and relay information to the Committee. I would like to see a stronger committee with more people doing more things. We can only do so much, with extra active helpers we can, and should, do more. Help us to help others and yourselves. You never know when you might require some help.

I conclude by wishing all members a very enjoyable ‘Happy Christmas’ and New Year.

Michael Thatcher

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A YEAR AT HAYDON SCHOOL

Haydon enjoyed another exciting and productive academic year in 2001-2002. In this article I shall just touch upon some of the things that have given us pleasure during the year. Many of the things covered in this brief article appear in more detail in our newsletter, News Link. It is delivered to our nearest neighbours and to local libraries. I do hope that you get an opportunity to read it.

Our GCE examination results at A level were once again very pleasing. About 200 students took the examination, or its vocational equivalent AVCE (Advanced Certificate of Vocational Education). The average student achieved the equivalent of about three grade Cs, a very encouraging achievement bearing in mind that passes range from grade A-E at this level. One student, Chris Godwin, who you may have read about in the local paper, achieved a staggering four As and a B, and he is going to study Law at Oxford University.

The GCSE results this year were a little disappointing in that only 56% of students achieved five or more passes at A*- C. However, there were some very encouraging features of the results. Three out the country's top five sociology students (there were more than 10.000 who took the exam nationally) came from Haydon, a truly amazing statistic. In addition, 6% of results were at A* and 18% at A* or A. Nine students managed the equivalent of ten grade As or better, with one student managing to achieve eleven A*s. Able and well-motivated students are clearly able to reach their potential at Haydon.

The school achieved excellent results in Key Stage 3 SATs. These are tests in English, Maths and Science taken by Year 9 students (13 year olds). 79% achieved grade 5 or better in English and Science, and 83% in Mathematics. This compares to around 65% in all three subjects nationally.

Haydon School has a large number of links with the wider community. Many outside speakers come into the school throughout the course of the year to talk to students on a range of issues. For example, the Metropolitan Police make a large contribution to our Personal, Social, Health Education programme (PSHE). We ran for the first time in many years a very successful Higher Education Conference for sixth formers at Haydon and other schools. A large number of universities and other organisations came to Haydon to help advise students about their future options. As well as speakers coming into Haydon our students frequently go out to help in the community. The Year 11 drama group, for example, performed a piece of coursework at the Harrow Arts Centre. Performance Studies students in Year 13 performed community inspired pieces at the Tithe Barn, Grimsdyke Hotel and The Crucible at the Compass Theatre. Year 10 Art students visited Whiteheath Infant School to help the children there design and paint their school mural.

The Modern Languages department continued its extensive programme of community links, including language lessons in primary schools and its masterclass programme at Haydon. The summer school for children gifted in languages continues to be very popular. Community languages continue to flourish, with lessons in languages such as Urdu, Cantonese and Portugese on offer. A particularly exciting development was the first video link with our partner school in Florence, Italy. Huge cheers greeted the first pictures, which were celebrated with champagne (non-alcoholic, of course!)

Trips and visits continue to be a great feature of school life. There were over a hundred trips in 2001-2002, including sixteen overseas. These included a ski trip to Quebec, a scuba diving trip to Lanzarote, a camp for Year 9 students to France, a History trip to Ypres, and exchanges to Japan and Italy.

Haydon collects large sums for charities including Michael Sobell House, the St John's Ambulance Cadets, the Alzheimer’s' Society, Barnardos, Jeans for Genes and Task Brazil. Although it is impossible to keep an accurate account, the school raises over £10,000 a year for charity.

Finally, I wish to thank you personally for all your support. I am fully aware of some of the problems caused by traffic generated by the school, and the occasional lack of consideration towards our neighbours of one or two students or parents. I hope that this article has emphasised, however, how well many of students do at Haydon, and the great contribution they make to the wider community.

Peter Woods – Headteacher

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FRIENDS OF NORTHWOOD & PINNER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

The League of Friends support to Northwood and Pinner Community Hospital continues with the committee meeting every 4 to 6 weeks. So far this financial year we have purchased and donated a number of items including several to the Physiotherapy Department.

We have continued to ensure that patients benefit personally from our funds. The much-appreciated birthday card and gift a pleasant surprise. We recently donated three Panasonic radios with tape and CD facility as an alternative to television when it was realised that not everyone can see or wants to watch television. Regular afternoon entertainment with semi-professionals is paid for by the Friends, and also the yearly subscription to the large print Readers Digest. Our special Jubilee celebration afternoon for patients was a great success.

The above will give you some idea as to how we make use of our funds to which so many donated and we appreciate the support given to the Friends by the local residents and others.

Frank Armour, Chairman.

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NORTHWOOD LIONS

Once again a good day was had by all at our Carnival Event held at Northwood Football Club in Chestnut Avenue on August Bank Holiday Monday. This year the weather was, unfortunately, not as good as 2001. This was reflected in the number of people attending and consequently the money raised.

Despite this, a very creditable £2550 was raised, all of which will be disbursed to local organisations within the next week. The main beneficiary of this year’s event is the Templeton Day Centre for Alzheimers sufferers, which is currently relocating from its old premises in St Vincent’s Hospital to new premises in Joel Street. They will receive £1750. The remainder of the proceeds will be distributed to five other local organisations including Vyners Swing Band who entertained so magnificently on the day, St John’s Ambulance and two local Scout Troops.

Planning the event was hard work but enjoyable. Each year we run the event we seem to become more proficient however it does stretch the entire resources of the club for the day itself. We are grateful this year for the support on the organising committee of our daughter club, Denham Lions Club, who have been in existence for just one year. As a club, we have agreed, in principle, to organise Carnival No 5 for next year, now we just need to find a committee!" We also appreciate the generous support of the local community and Northwood F.C without whom our efforts would be in vain.

We have a number of other events planned between now and Christmas including a fish and chip supper and a concert visit for the Elderly, fund raising tin shakes at Waitrose and Tesco’s and a visit to a local theatre.

We have had to bid a sad farewell to two of our members who have moved out of the area so the hunt is now on to replace them. If you would like to join us come along to one of our meetings and see how we have fun whilst serving the community.

Eric Holland

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ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY

Harrow and Hillingdon Branch

Many thanks to Northwood Hills Residents’ Association for their warm welcome.

We were already on the fringe of Northwood Hills up on the hill at St. Vincent’s where we enjoyed a wonderful view, but we are happy now to be descending into its bosom where our clients will be able to be part of its community and able to drop into a café for a coffee or a pub for lunch.

Now a little about the Harrow and Hillingdon Branch of the Alzheimer’s Society. We exist to support and help people with dementia and their families. Alzheimer’s disease is one of these illnesses, but there are other causes such as stroke and Pick’s disease and the later stages of diseases such as Parkinson’s. We run support groups for carers where problems are shared and information given on where to go for help and how to cope with some of the difficulties. In an ever more isolating situation, it is good to know you are not alone and there is someone to talk to. Even a phone call helps and I am available on 01923 824235.

Now back to the Templeton Day Centre, which was created specifically for people with dementia under the age of 65, for whom previously there had been no dedicated day care. After a period of joint fundraising with St. Vincent’s Hospital (The Holding Hands Appeal) it opened in a refurbished ward and gradually grew to meet the need, which we knew existed. With expert, trained staff, both paid and voluntary, the service has become highly regarded and opens now five days a week between 9am and 5pm. Not only do the clients enjoy going there, but also their carers get precious time to relax, catch up on chores or see a friend.

Our licence was for 5 years, which we expected to renew. Sadly however, St. Vincent’s Hospital had to close its excellent orthopaedic surgical services and the trustees made other plans for the property, which did not include us.

Naturally, the local Branch of the Alzheimer’s Society looked to make alternative plans, yet just as it was seeming impossible to find appropriate accommodation within our budget, Robin Pagan from the United Reformed Church in Joel Street approached us suggesting we might find some space in their rather large building as the Church was keen to be involved with the local community.

To cut quite a long story short, building is now in full flow. A firewall is dividing the Church in half and the new Centre will occupy the back half, which will extend sideways to create sufficient space. This will involve fund-raising all over again, so if you are aware of any sources of funding, I would be more than grateful to hear from you. The Church has entered into the project with warmth and enthusiasm, which has done wonders in counteracting the sense of loss and rejection felt by those who attend the Centre.

The lease terminated at the end of August and we hoped and expected that we would be allowed to remain at St. Vincent’s until the first stage of the building work would be completed in a couple of months. However, while the building will remain empty, we were turned out and another desperate search to keep the service flowing ensued. Many coincidences were in our favour, and with good will from many quarters we managed to move completely in just over a week! So now we are temporally at Milmans’ Resource Centre in Pinner, but we are in good heart and looking forward to our permanent home in ‘the Hills’.

Hazel (Templeton) Gammage.

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AARON POND

15 years old It is always a sad time when a young life comes to an end, particularly so when caused by an accident. The death of Aaron, who’s life came to an end in Norwich Road when control was lost of a motor scooter that he was riding on the evening of September 5th. His death has deeply affected many residents, in addition to devastating his family and friends. This Association sends sincere condolences to all those traumatised by this tragedy.

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CHILD SAFETY

Research identifies that child pedestrian casualties peak at about the age of 12, and child cyclist casualties at about the age of 14. Boys are more frequently injured than girls. Nearly a fifth of child pedestrian casualties happen on the school journey, but this proportion increases for secondary school aged children. Children in Britain are more likely to be accompanied by other children than adults.

Northwood Hills Resident’s Association is well aware of the local Road Safety issues raised by many schools attracting children from out of the locality. Neighbourhood Parents have raised concerns as a result of the withdrawal of the Cycling Proficiency Examination in 2001. This has left children who are now in Year 7 without the opportunity for road safety preparation in advance of transfer to Secondary school. There is a proposal to tackle the deficit by:

  1. Introducing practical road safety training through Hillside After School Club.

  2. Purchase ‘Smart Moves’ CD-ROMs for year 6 in Schools Hillside and Harlyn and Year 7,8 and 9 in Northwood and Haydon Schools.

  3. Introduce ‘Traffic Clubs’ to all three year olds through nursery classes with additional books every 6 months.

  4. Purchase monitoring and evaluation through Brunel University to demonstrate whether local improvements justify introduction throughout the authority.

Jan Constable.

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TELEPHONE PREFERENCE SERVICE

Do you get fed up with telephone sales? Why is it they always seem to phone at dinner-time? If, like me, you are getting more and more irritated and are tending to snap at the sales person, why don’t you register with the Telephone Preference Service which is designed to stop this infernal nuisance. If any calls do sneak through the words, "I don’t think that I should be receiving this call because I’m registered with the Telephone Preference Service", will soon see them off.

The number to call to register is 08450 700707. Call them now, you don’t even speak to a human, it’s all done by pressing numbers on your phone and giving your details.

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THE HILLINGDON HOSPITAL NHS TRUST VOLUNTARY TRANSPORT SERVICE

This voluntary service was originally introduced at Mount Vernon Hospital in 1984, providing a transport service for local people who may have difficulty getting to and from hospital to attend out-patient appointments or admissions.

There is no charge for this service. Patients are collected from their own homes by private cars, belonging to one of our volunteers, in good time for their appointments. Patients are then taken to Hospital and collected from the designated area and returned home.

This is not an ambulance service, but dependant upon out team of volunteers who give their time freely. The Following Hospitals local to Hillingdon are covered by this service: -

The Hillingdon Hospital

Mount Vernon Hospital

Watford General Hospital

3 days notice is normally required to arrange a journey, availability will depend upon a suitable volunteer driver being able to carry out the journey at the requested time and day.

If you would like to arrange a journey to any of the Hospitals or services mentioned above.

Please Telephone 01923 844356 during 10 am - 3.30pm, Monday to Friday, having the details ready of which Hospital you need to visit, the day and time of your appointment, as well as your name, address and contact telephone number.

 

CAN YOU HELP US?

WE ALWAYS NEED DRIVERS

YOUR PETROL COSTS ARE REIMBURSED

 

IF YOU HAVE TIME TO SPARE AND WANT TO KNOW MORE

ABOUT JOINING OUR VOLUNTARY TRANSPORT SCHEME AS A VOLUNTEER

PLEASE PHONE

Tina Dinch at Hillingdon or Mount Vernon Hospitals on

01895 279856 or 01923 844264

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MOUNT VERNON MINOR INJURIES UNIT

Please take note that the Minor Injuries Unit at Mount Vernon Hospital has shortened its operational hours, losing an hour at each end of the day. The new times of working are 9am – 8pm.

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PLANNING OFFICERS REPORT

Tolcarne Service Station - Since my last report a further application has since been submitted by Esso. The earlier application, which ended up as an appeal to the Secretary of State, has now been withdrawn and has been replaced by a revised proposal. This does not reduce the size of the proposed shop, but simply sets it further back to reduce the environmental intrusion. This proposal is being considered by the planning department and although I hope it will be refused, this cannot be taken for granted. I am pleased to say, however, that so far we have had considerable support from the council planning department and planning sub-committee, who are as dedicated as we are to protecting the viability of Northwood Hills. I have noted the strong opposition by both retailers and residents and I have passed this information to the planning department.

St Vincent's Hospital Site - The planning application for a nursing home on this site has been approved, subject to certain conditions, which are not likely to be a problem. The proposed housing development has received outline approval subject to detailed proposals being submitted. An application will be made in due course by whoever buys the land. The size of the nursing home will be determined by the amount of money available from the sale of the land, i.e. either 60 or 45 beds. I personally believe that the final outcome will be highly satisfactory. We did lose some green land to the eastern side of Wiltshire Lane, owing to development of a housing estate. This, however, will be compensated for in 2004 when land at the top of the site is cleared of all the derelict hospital buildings, thus providing an open aspect onto Haste Hill. This was a condition of approval. The western side, which is subject to the current proposals, is a "brown land" site, i.e. land that is already built on. This will be completely cleared and, providing all goes as planned, will contain a nursing home at the top of the site and a housing estate lower down. None of this will entail the loss of green land and the provision of a nursing home will continue the St Vincent's tradition of caring. The provision of a new nursing home is particularly welcome when so many residential and nursing homes throughout the country are closing, thus causing long waiting lists. Unfortunately, the development at St Vincent's made it impossible for the Templeton Day Centre for the younger Alzheimer's sufferers to continue on the site. The centre was housed in one of the buildings scheduled for demolition. I'm pleased to say, however, that it has now been re-housed in part of the United Reform Church in Joel Street. The main church building has been divided, with the day centre in the front half and the church itself at the rear. When an application for the alteration was submitted we wrote to the planning department of the Council giving full support.

Northwood School - An application was submitted to construct extra classrooms etc in Potter Street, following the building line of a caretaker's house. Several residents were very concerned about the environmental impact on Poter Street. Our chairman quickly arranged a meeting at the school between residents of Potter Street, the head teacher and others. Once the proposal had been fully explained fears were allayed and the problem resolved.

House extensions - The planning department of the council receives numerous applications for house extensions. It would be almost a full-time job for me to look at each one. Actually we do not intervene unless a neighbour complains to us. Most proposals are reasonable but sometimes a resident will propose a large extension adversely affecting his neighbour. A case like this can be difficult, as both parties could be members of the Association. Nevertheless, we have to treat the problem without bias and support whatever it is fair and reasonable. So far, however, we have not experienced any such problem.

Lishman Easby – Planning Officer

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TUBE TRAVELLING FOR THE DISABLED

London Transport, in collaboration with Scope, has now produced an excellent Tube Access Guide specifically for disabled people, giving information about how to plan a journey avoiding stairs and escalators. It is a similar map to the one we are all used to (only larger) but with the addition of different symbols to explain the accessibility of the platforms. The guide is obtainable by telephoning 020 7941 4600. Contact is also via email access&mobility@tfl.gov.uk and www.thetube.com It must also be remembered that because of individual platform access it may be necessary to plot a different return route. A good example of this is Pinner, which has wheelchair access on the southbound line but not on the north. In an emergency please contact the Association Secretary Margot Barnikel, who holds a copy and will endeavour to help.

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ON-LINE

Want to know when and where events are happening? It’s useful to know ‘what and where’ whenever you are planning a day out or indeed going away on holiday. There is a huge database ranging right across the globe, and by far the best for the UK on the World Wide Events website: www.wwevents.com . Click where you are interested in and it’s all listed. If you are more interested in food try www.pubfoodguide.com , the name says it all. Two more that may be of interest are www.citynet-guide.co.uk and www.restaurant-guide.net

Whilst there are many sites offering information on the weather for speed and versatility try http://weather.yahoo.com/regional/Ukxx.html it lists more than a thousand locations throughout Britain, with a five-day forecast for each. Enjoy the outing. 

Margot Barnikel

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HELP FOR PEOPLE WITH M.S.

People with M.S. frequently have a great deal of trouble getting adequate insurance. Multiple Sclerosis. is a variable illness and doesn’t necessarily affect the lifespan of sufferers and many people should be eligible to receive the same beneficial offers as others.

The Multiple Sclerosis Society is launching a new range of insurance products tailored to individuals needs. On offer will be life insurance as well as policies for the home, motor and travel. The Society, through a deal with brokers Heath Lambert Group is able to offer policies, which are affordable. Many of the deals will be tailored to individual needs offering additional cover for carers and wheelchairs where necessary, and extra cover for specialist equipment such as stairlifts and hoists, plus insurance cover for MS related drugs if they deteriorate due to a refrigerator breakdown.

MS Society tel. no. 0808 800 8000

MS Society Insurance Services tel. no. 0800 783 3157 or visit www.mssociety.org.uk

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HARLYN PRIMARY SCHOOL

At the end of last term everyone was ready for a long well earned rest after a very busy year. Six weeks holiday-how lovely.!

However that seems a long time ago now and here we are already three weeks into a new term and a new school year.

Our new Reception children have taken their first steps in their full-time school career and are settling well. Its always more difficult for new parents when their children begin school. Just seeing a child in uniform waving goodbye for the first time, is enough to bring tears to any parents eyes!

So what do children at Harlyn want to achieve this year? Well ,we always ask pupils to focus on something they are going to try hard to achieve-here are a few examples from a year 3 and 5 class.

In year 3 I would like to----improve my spelling

---learn my 8,9,11,12and 7 times tables

--improve my spelling and handwriting

--know my sentences and know my 6 times table

---read more books and get better at work.

Year 5--- things we would like to achieve include

Swimming, handwriting

Keep our tempers

make more friends

make it into the sports team

speak better English

Lets all hope they achieve their goals.

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OUR GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS

It was during the Autumn term last year that we started thinking about how Harlyn was going to celebrate the queens 50year reign.

A working party of staff began organising a programme of events that would eventually last the whole week, leading up to the national celebrations in June.

The first event held was a balloon race organised by our Fund Raising Assoc.. Nearly 700 balloons were released into the sky and signalled the beginning of a very busy memorable week . The vision of red, white and blue against the background of a clear blue sunny sky, was a wonderful sight. The eventual winners’ balloon was found in Lincolnshire!

On Tuesday we held a Jubilee quiz. Representatives from the different "houses" in the school took part and it was very impressive to see how much the children had learnt about the queen’s reign.

Wednesday was the day for everyone to dress up in clothes spanning the 5 decades of the queen’s reign. The children and indeed the staff excelled themselves and everyone had great fun.

On Thursday we held a karaoke festival. Again both pupils and staff showed off their talents and our school resounded to the sounds of music from the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and90s.

The final day of our Jubilee week was celebrated by holding a huge playground party. Amazingly the sun shone and out came the long lines of tables and hundreds of union jacks. The children sang and danced to the disco. I am sure our neighbours must have heard us enjoying ourselves! The party was a fantastic climax to our week of events and after the party the children left school clutching a Jubilee commemorative coin presented by the Fund Raising Association.

The whole week was a great success and was enjoyed by everyone. The album of photos we have from the week will serve as a permanent reminder of how Harlyn celebrated our Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

Mrs Lack - Headteacher

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JUNK MAIL

It doesn’t matter whether the junk plops through the front door or downloads off the internet, it’s all a nuisance. The suggestion given to control internet junk mail is to have two addresses, one that you only give to friends and colleagues and another for use if you wish to buy anything this way or go into sites where you may be required to fill in your email address. It’s these last sites that pass on your address to other companies. It costs the companies next to nothing to send out literature to thousands of people but it costs you money to download, so think about it.

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TURN THEM OFF

Your mobile phones that is, whenever you go into a petrol station. There have been several cases recently where mobile phones have ignited petrol. In all cases it happened when the phone rang during the time the car was being filled. Remember you don’t have control over when it rings. It would appear that it is the more modern phones that are the problem, that is the ones that light up when they are switched on or when they ring, these phones have enough energy to provide the damaging spark. Remember people have been injured, equipment damaged and vehicles destroyed. Don’t let it be you.

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BANKING CHANGE

It isn’t the easies thing in world to change banks especially when you have direct debits involved. For many of us we would have changed long ago if it wasn’t for the trauma of ‘upsetting the applecart’. Now there may be some help to hand. ‘Which’ has just introduced a new web page offering advice and steps to take for those people who wish to switch banks. It’s at www.switchwithwhich.co.uk

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WHAT’S ON AT St. EDMUND’S

The Parish Church of St. Edmund the King, Northwood Hills, is one of several Church of England Churches serving the Northwood Hills area. Actually, the boundary between our Parish and that of Emmanuel, Northwood, runs right down the middle of Joel Street! The Church itself is about 500 yards from Northwood Hill Circus along the Pinner Road.

As you would expect, the major activities at the Church are those connected with Christian worship, lead by the Vicar, Fr. Bruce Driver. These take place throughout the week, and do of course include special celebrations of all Christian festivals. There are also many social and cultural activities at the Church, well supported by the wider community.

For example, there is a regular programme of concerts of classical musical - "Classic Concerts at St. Edmund’s". The coming season includes a rare opportunity (on Sunday 3rd November) to hear one the beautiful Brahms String Sextets, played by the Concert Players. We are very pleased that these wonderful musicians (members and former members of the BBC Concert Orchestra) have become closely associated with Classic Concerts. For the Mozart Concert on 26th January, they will be joined by Vivien Banfield in the E flat Piano Quartet K493.

Whilst on a Classical theme, on Saturday 14th December there will be a Trumpet and Organ recital in the Church, and on Saturday 5th October there will be a concert given by the Royal Air Force Association President’s Band.

In January, there is the annual Pantomime. This is now a local institution -it started in 1965, as has not missed a year since then. This year, it is the turn of "Humpty Dumpty" to receive the St. Edmund’s treatment - which is to present a thoroughly traditional pantomime, suitable for all ages to enjoy. We nearly always sell out for most of the 9 performances, so make sure you get your tickets early - look out for our posters in Northwood Hills and Pinner for details nearer the time.

On Saturday 16th November we hold this year’s Christmas Fair. A bit early? Well, not compared with most shops. But come and stock up with those special little presents, and bring the children to see Father Christmas in the best grotto this side of Lapland!

But back to worship - in addition to the normal Sunday services, there will be special Remembrance Day services on Sunday 10th November, on Wednesday 20th November we celebrate the feast day of St. Edmund, and then on the evening Sunday 1st December there will be a special service of Advent Carols. And then it’s Christmas - 9 Lessons and Carols on Sunday 22nd December, the wonderful Blessing of the Crib service on Christmas Eve, when the Church is packed with vast legions of children, and of course Midnight Mass later in the evening.

There’s something at St. Edmund’s for everyone - there’s a Badminton Club, a Flower-arranging Guild, a Painting Group (watercolours), a Women’s Guild, and thriving groups of Rainbows, Brownies, Beavers, Cubs and Scouts.

For more details, and to keep up to date, check out www.saintedmundschurch.org.uk - it’s all there!

Mike Godden

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MEALS ON WHEELS

Have you ever thought what it would be like to be housebound and unable to cook for yourself? There are, in fact, many hundreds of people in this situation in Ruislip / Northwood who rely upon the Meals on Wheels Service. Every day, teams of volunteers, mostly active retired people, leave Ascott Court (opposite the Eastcote Ground) to deliver hot lunches to people who need help in this way. In some cases, it may be the only contact they have with other people from one day to the next, and they very much appreciate the visit, even though it is necessarily only a very brief one. It is said that it is better to give than to receive, and the volunteers themselves find the work very rewarding. There is always a need for more people to help, either as drivers (of white vans!) or escorts (who deliver the meals and collect money). If you can spare 2 or 3 hours once a week, once a fortnight, or even occasionally, and would be interested in joining the team, please contact either Josie or Pauline at Ascott Court on 020 8868 7318.

Laurence Scudder - (volunteer)

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PARKS PATROL

We are often told of behaviour (and worse) problems in the park. If you witness behaviour that needs official attention then just phone 01895 239241. The patrol have made a commitment to be on site within 15 minutes.

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NORTHWOOD JUNIOR SCHOOL REUNION

The plan was hatched in June 2000 when I organized my first reunion for pupils who left Northwood Primary School in 1948. The get-together proved very successful, although we could only muster twenty-one people. Someone suggested we hold another one in two years but to include other people who attended the school in the 1940’s and early 1950’s.

After mulling it over for a while I decided to go ahead, so by autumn 2001 I was sending adverts to various magazines and contacting people still residing in Northwood who might have some contact with other old students. It was about this time that my family acquired a computer and I found the friendsreunited website. What a marvellous source this turned out to be. After joining the ‘friends’ I was able to contact lots of the familiar names that leaped out from the screen at me. Our REUNION 2002 was on its way!

We agreed on a date, the 16th June, and as I realised there would be many more attendees this time I hired a local hall for the day. This turned out to be good foresight as we ended up with well over sixty!!! People came from all parts of England from Staffs down to Devon and one lady made a special trip from the USA to stay with her sister in Dorset so that they could both attend. We also received good luck messages from others who had emigrated to places like Australia, Canada and Peru.

The proceedings started at noon with drinks and everyone getting to know each other again, remember it was over fifty years since some of us had seen each other!! This was followed by lunch, after which we mingled and chatted, studied the old photographs, memorabilia etc. which was on display. There was lots of laughter when people recognized themselves in the old photographs – black and white, of course. Sadly there were too many of us to take a group photograph but we managed a few smaller groups and David Hurn had the lovely idea of making a video of the day. It turned out brilliantly and my copy will be treasured for many years to come.

Another good thing to come out of the reunion was that I was able to reunite Doreen Dean (nee Sawyer) and Joy Gibson (nee Palmer). Doreen saw my advert in a magazine and although she was unable to attend she contacted me and she explained that she had been Joy’s bridesmaid in the 1950s but had lost touch after moving. Joy did come to the reunion and just afterwards she and her brother Alan went to Billericay and met up with Doreen. I’m sure that they had a lot to catch up on.

At the end of the 16th June I was absolutely worn out but on reading the feedback from everyone it was well worth it and we’re looking forward to our next reunion.

WATCH THIS SPACE!!!

Marion Wilson (nee Addison).

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MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT and LOCAL COUNCILLORS SURGERY

On the 3rd Monday of each month (excepting August), between 8pm and 9pm in Northwood Hills Library Annexe, you can meet with our Member of Parliament and one or other of our Local Councillors

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NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

Excerpts taken from the school newsletter.

July 2002 announced the many staff changes at the end of the school year, wished well those departing and welcomed newcomers. Mrs Brisbourne the much loved and respected Headteacher also retired and a particularly warm welcome was made to Mrs Ketley, who will replace her.

Bhavisha Parmar reached the outstanding total of 1500 Form Points and was warmly congratulated, two pupils attained 1200 points and yet three more have 1000 points.

Seven of the Year 12 Sports Leaders have been going to Hillside Junior School to help out with their P.E. lessons, they also assisted at the Hillside Sports Day on 17th July.

During the summer break work will be undertaken to separate pedestrians from vehicles as follows:-

  1. The vehicle entrance to the roadway leading from Potter Street towards the Sports Hall will be resurfaced designed to prevent people walking on it. Pedestrians will use the adjacent footpath.

  2. The entrance to the upper car park will be similarly resurfaced and a new pedestrian path will be installed.

  3. Cyclists will be obliged to dismount and walk their cycles down the footpath and then across the car park to the bike sheds. They must then enter the school by the nearest entrance and not walk back through the car park.

Charity Fund Raising Three Year 12 students took part in a tandem skydive from 10,000 feet to raise money for the Anthony Nolan Trust. Anvil Lamba, Alex Wigg and Reema Patel raised over £1,000 and are hoping to repeat the event next year. Two Year 12 students and two adults took part in the highest abseil possible in London by descending 500 feet from the Guy’s Hospital Tower. Ian Vidgen, Craig Goodship-Patience, Andy Hill and John Renton raised over £500, again for the Anthony Nolan Trust. The Everyman Cancer Research Campaign benefited to the tune of £200 when nine Year 12 students took part in a 12 hour sponsored fast. These students were motivated in this project by a very moving talk in General Studies.

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BOTTLE SCHEME

Pensioners in the Borough of Hillingdon are being encouraged to involve themselves in a scheme recently launched by members of Lions Clubs in Hillingdon – a scheme which might well save their lives were they to suddenly fall ill in their homes.

The idea is that they are provided with a small bottle into which is placed vital information such as contact numbers of family and friends, lists of allergies, medical conditions and medication taken. This bottle can be stuck to a convenient feature like a fridge door. Two green stickers accompany the bottle, one to be placed adjacent to the bottle and the other in a prominent position in the entrance hall. All emergency services will now look for the green cross symbol shown on the stickers.

This bottle can be obtained free from all pharmacies, health centres and doctors’ surgeries. By the end of 2002 it is hoped 10,000 people will have signed up to the scheme.

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HILLINGDON POLICE COMMUNITY ADVICE LINE

(0202 246 1501 e-mail  hillingdonpolice@aol.com) ......was designed and implemented 18 months ago in order to streamline the types of telephone calls going into the Hillingdon control room. This office hopes to intercept the non-urgent type of call, at source, so that telephone calls requiring an urgent police response may be dealt with more quickly. We cover ...(among other things)

  1. Abandoned vehicles (we check that they are not stolen and pass the details to the abandoned vehicle department of the LBH whose job it is to remove such vehicles) for a vehicle to be classed as abandoned, it must have NO current tax disc and not be parked outside the owners address.
  2. Untaxed vehicles are dealt with by DVLA, the Government Dept, we work closely with the local DVLA enforcement team and will forward details of any untaxed vehicle to them on your behalf.
  3. Messages for police officers, we act as a first point of contact for the public if they wish to speak with a specific officer or their local beat officer, we will e-mail the officer so that the next time he/she is working, they will see your message and call you.
  4. Lost property...rather than queue at the front desk of a police office, we can take the details of any property you may have lost and enter those details into our systems here.
  5. General enquires... we deal with a considerable number of questions which can be dealt with over the telephone, freeing up officers to deal with more urgent matters.
    We have even dealt with an allegation of voodoo recently! We also use today's technology to a large degree dealing with Internet crime, e-mailing schools direct, about child safety issues, this scheme was the first of its kind in the UK and has been involved in the arrests of some 26 persons.

We also have a surprising number of e-mails direct from the public relating to all manner of questions and incidents.

The office is open Monday to Friday from 10am till 6pm and in the event of me being on the telephone your call will automatically be directed to my voice mail, if your problem is urgent please telephone 01895 251212 and ask for the Hillingdon control room, or in the event of an emergency dial 999. PC Tony Donaghy  592XH

Community Advice Line - Hillingdon Police

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LOCAL POLICING

P.C. Malcolm Ruddock, as I write, is rapidly approaching the end of his career with the Metropolitan Police. When you read this he will have left the service. As many of you will know he has been a good friend to this community and we are happy to announce that we shall continue to make use of his experience and time. This Association conferred upon him an Honorary Life Membership and he has volunteered, and we have accepted, to attend our meeting and work with us in a continuation of his previous activities. We wish him well in his change of direction.

We have yet to meet Malcolm’s replacement but hope to rectify this in the near future.

Michael Thatcher

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NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

In Chestnut Avenue

The club have made giant strides in recent years, both on and off the pitch. After joining the Isthmian League in 1992, the senior club have enjoyed a number of successful seasons and currently play in the Ryman (Isthmian) League Division One North.

During that time the club have won the Isthmian Associate Members cup on a couple of occasion, won the Isthmian League Cup last season and have twice been runners up in the Middlesex Senior Cup. The club has a huge youth set-up with teams of all ages playing their football within the confines of Northwood Park. This commitment to youth football has recently been recognised by the award of The Football Association’s Charter Standard. The club also runs two senior teams below the 1st X1 as well as a ‘vets’ eleven.

Progress on the pitch is being matched by events off it with the clubhouse currently undergoing a major renovation with a new extension being added. Coupled with major improvements within the ground and the upgrading of the floodlights Northwood Football Club is certainly laying the foundations for a long and successful future enabling them to play a pivotal role in the local community.

The Clubhouse / Bar is available for hire, at very reasonable rates, for those special occasions be it a wedding, birthday or just a party. For more information contact Betty Walley (Club Secretary) on 020 8866 2649.

Robin Piper

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PROGRESS

The first steps are being taken towards the introduction of a controlled parking zone in Northwood Hills. Whether you regard this as progress, I leave to you. Certainly, as always, the subject is highly controversial; some people consider they have an absolute right to drive and park their car wherever they wish, and any restriction to do so, as an infringement on their liberty; plus of course, having to pay for parking space, as ‘the thin end of the wedge’ allegedly leading to higher charges later. Other people welcome the measures, which will, in theory, be used for improved safety measures in Northwood Hills. Traffic calming measures are constantly called for, plus several zebra crossings are necessary to enable children and elderly people to cross busy roads with some degree of safety. Therefore, as an initial step, preliminary talks are being held with our four schools and the chairman of your residents association (Michael Thatcher) together with the Council’s traffic engineers, local shopkeepers and Councillors. Full consultation, with public meetings, will be encouraged, and everyone in Northwood Hills will be advised about the dates and venues, to enable residents to participate in the debate. At the earliest, we are looking at 2004 before the agreed measures are likely to be implemented, in the meantime, thank you for your patience.

Councillor David Bishop

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NORTHWOOD LIVE AT HOME

I would like to introduce you to Ivy. She is a neighbour living in Northwood. Ivy is 84 years old and lives alone in the home where she and her husband brought up their family. Ivy lost her husband five years ago, her son works as a consultant in a hospital in Canada and her daughter is headteacher of a school in the north of England. Visits are few and far between. Ivy misses seeing her grandchildren.

Until recently Ivy drove her own car, was an active member with a local charity and enjoyed visits to the theatre. Ivy still potters in her delightful garden tending to the roses she has nurtured over the years, but advancing arthritis and breathlessness is forcing her to stay at home more and more.

Shopping has become difficult and trips to the theatre have become a thing of the past. Ivy is becoming lonely and isolated.

If you would like to meet Ivy please contact Elizabeth Balfré - Co-ordinator at the Northwood Live At Home Scheme 01923 842494. Oaklands Gate Library, 12 Oaklands Gate, Northwood HA6 3AA

Northwood Live at Home is a befriending scheme, set up to assist older people who are isolated and unable to get out and about on their own through physical frailty.

Loneliness and isolation are important factors in the stress and difficulties older people face and can be a reason why they need to go into residential care. This Scheme enables older people to remain in their own home for as long as possible and encourages members to regain lost confidence and enjoy a greater quality of life.

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HARROW CINE & VIDEO SOCIETY

The Harrow Cine & Video Society will present its annual Autumn Big Screen Film and Video Show in the Pinner Village Hall, Chapel Lane on Wednesday, 30th October at 8pm. Doors open at 7.30pm. Tickets at the door are £3.50, which includes interval refreshments.

As in previous years, the programme will include a newsreel of local events filmed by members of the Society, with particular emphasis on the Queen’s Golden Jubilee events held within the Borough, and Her Majesty’s visit to the Barnet Copthall Stadium.

The Society meets every Monday evening from September to May at the Harrow Arts Centre in Hatch End. For further information contact the Secretary, Heather Lee on 020 8863 7628.

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WEB SITE

Don’t forget to look at our web-site www.northwoodhills.co.uk from time to time, it is updated regularly and we would welcome suggestions about content. If you have any contributions or comments please contact Ray Krystofiak on 020 8866 3241 who will be pleased to hear from you.

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MEMORIES OF HALF MILE LANE + NORTHWOOD

I was born in Brixton in 1909 and came to live in Northwood six months later with my parents, as my father had been appointed the first manager of the Playhouse cinema, situated at the top of the High Street where the old folks club stands today. Of course at that time the High Street was called Half Mile Lane. I remember we came all the way from Brixton in a horse-drawn pantechnicon to 5 Hilliard Road and soon after to a house opposite the cinema where the rent was 3 shillings and 8 pence a week, about 17p in today’s money. A little later my father could have bought four houses there for £600. Auntie Win played the piano in the cinema to accompany the silent films and my uncle played the big drum to simulate people falling down. Coconuts were tied together and shaken to represent horses galloping. It cost 4d, I think, for admission. When the First World War came and my father went into the Middlesex Regiment, my mother then ran the cinema. After he was demobbed my father started a decorating business from home.

Because of problems with my feet I spent about 4 years in hospital in central London but I attended Pinner Road School on crutches with my sweetheart, who became my wife in 1933, when we were married at Emmanuel Church. There was a ditch running all the way from the school to Chestnut Avenue where we used to float our boats. Mr Fendick was the headmaster and there were 30 – 40 pupils in a class. We had lunch there and in the breaks used to play marbles, hoops, five stones and cigarette cards (‘flickers,). There was a great field at the back. School outings were often to Bricket Wood in a horse-drawn conveyance.

The fire station was behind the Clifton Hotel by what is the Iron Bridge today. They would fire a rocket at the Council Offices in Oaklands Gate when there was a fire. All the firemen would come rushing down Half Mile Lane putting on their helmets. The horse which drew the fire engine was owned by the council and would quickly have to be released from whatever work it was doing.

You could buy everything you needed in Half Mile Lane then from shoes to sweets, cakes to clothes. Tom Harris was the regular street sweeper here and the policeman on duty would test every shop door as he walked on his beat in the evening. There were no houses above Emmanuel Church and at the top, where there is today the junction with Green Lane and Northwood Way; there was a big pond where the horses used to drink before going on to London. From the True Lover’s Knot you could walk to Uxbridge through woods almost without seeing a house. At the back of this pub, were extensive fields where horses were kept to draw the cabs, some of which operated from Northwood Station. Joel Street was more of a path than a road and a horse and cart could just get through. There was a ditch all the way along on what is the station side and Warboys, the butcher, kept sheep in the fields along Joel Street. Interestingly, Potter Street was then called Porridge Pot Hill.

I was in the Wolf Cubs and then the Scouts even thought my legs were in irons until I was 15. The Scout hut was near where the Iron Bridge is located today and there was a scout band, which played around Northwood and at Emmanuel Church. We used to go camping at the Gravel Pits, just along from the True Lover’s Knot. I remember when the bell destined for Emmanuel Church was delivered to Northwood Station and was standing on the platform. Haste Hill Golf Course did not open until 1928 and the road leading to it, The Drive, only had one house called Dane End, so named because they used to breed Great Dane dogs there.

During the Second World War the doodlebug, which fell in Addison Way, shook our house in Hilliard Road so severely that all the ceilings collapsed. We had moved to this road when we got married in 1933; the rent was about 6 – 7 shillings a week and the rooms were lit by oil lamps, something which was behind the times even for then. Also during that war a house at the bottom of the High street was hit by a shell and all the occupants, who were sleeping in the attic, were killed.

If you would like me to continue with some more reminiscences of older days in Northwood, please do let the editor of ‘The Echo’ know.

An Elderly Resident

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FAMILY HOLIDAYS

In the Autumn 2001 issue I wrote about a company called ‘The Holiday Care Service’, who are an information service for people with all kinds of disabilities who are interested in travelling widely with their friends and relatives. They publish guides on accessible accommodation and useful travel information on about 40 different countries. Call 01293 774535 or visit www.holidaycare.org.uk

Access Travel offers self catering holiday homes in France, weekend breaks in Paris, Dublin and Amsterdam, and holidays in the Canaries, Italy, Majorca, Algarve, Malta and Florida. All their selected hotels have special facilities for wheelchair users. Call 01942 888844 or visit www.access-travel.co.uk

Can be Done offers both short breaks and longer holidays in many countries as diverse as Sardinia and Canada. The managing director is a wheelchair user so knows exactly what’s needed. Call 020 8907 2400 or visit www.canbedone.co.uk

Chalfont Line Holidays offers holidays for mature people, slow walkers or wheelchair users. The cost varies according to the amount of care needed. Holidays range from food and wine tasting in France to a Caribbean Cruise. Call 01895 459540.

Groom Holidays offers UK holidays ranging from a self-catering bungalow in Ambleside, in the Lake District, to a specially adapted barge on the Norfolk Broads. Call 01446 771311 or visit www.johngrooms.org.uk

Radar Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation also offer information and advice on travel and holidays for physically disabled people. Call 020 7250 3222, or visit www.radar.org.uk

Margot Barnikel

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NEW HOURS FOR EASTCOTE LIBRARY

On the 2nd September 2002 Eastcote Library increased its opening hours. The new hours are as follows:-

Monday & Friday 10am – 5.30pm

Tuesday & Thursday 10am – 7pm

Saturday 9.30am – 4pm

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WAR MEMORIES OF ONE OF OUR ROAD STEWARDS

I served in two Regiments, the Suffolks and the Royal Fusiliers. My main allegiance is to the Suffolk Regiment. I was born in 1923 when my father was in the Regiment at Colchester. I joined the LNER Steamship Company when I left school in 1937.

On the outbreak of war, in 1939 the ship I was with, the S.S. Prague, as with most Railway Cross Channel Ferries, was converted to Troop Transports. In May and June 1940 we were posted to Dover. My ship S.S. Prague did three trips to Dunkirk on 29th, 30th and 31st May. On the last home run, the morning of 1st June, with 2,600 troops on board, we were damaged, fortunately all the troops got off safely. The ship was towed and beached at Deal. The total tally of troops rescued during the three trips was 6,700, this was recorded in the books, Railway Ships at War, Dunkirk and Dunkirk the Necessary Myth by Lord Greenway. I am humbly proud of my war contribution from the age of 16 years.

I came to live in Northwood Hills in 1945, working at Sainsbury’s in Joel Street, Green Lane, Northwood and Pinner and served as a Special Constable at Pinner for 14 ½ years from 1958 to 1972.

Reg Inkersole

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A GIFT OR A MEMORY

How often are you stuck for ideas for a present for someone who ‘has everything’? If like me it’s quite often, how’s this for an idea.

The British Library has thousands of books that need very urgent attention if they are not to crumble away and be lost forever. The current level of funding means that it would take 100 years for the books to be preserved, by which time most of them would be lost to future generations. The solution the Library has introduced is for a book to be adopted and the restoration paid for either by a book-lover, for a present or in memory of a friend or loved one. More than 400 books have so far been restored by this scheme including music scores and copies of the Koran. Conserving a book can cost as little as £15 or as much as £4,000. For £15 the donor’s name or chosen message will be recorded on a permanent bookplate, shared with others. Individual adoptions, where the donor’s name appears alone on the bookplate, start at £150 and for £1,000 the donor can choose the book they want to adopt. All donors receive a certificate to record the adoption and are invited to an annual ‘meet your book’ social event.

To adopt a book, contact the Development Office at the British Library 020 7412 7047 or www.bl.uk/adoptabook

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BEREAVEMENT REGISTER

This is a service specifically designed to remove from databases and mailing files, the names and addresses of people who have died. At this difficult time you will want to remember the good times with fondness, you will not want to be bombarded by badly targeted mail to someone who has recently passed away.

Bereavement Register Helpline 01732 460000

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LADIES TAKE NOTE – MEN'S RULES

Does this ring any bells?

  1. Learn to work the toilet seat. You’re a big girl. If it’s up, put it down. We need it up, you need it down. You don’t hear us bitching about you leaving it down.

  2. Birthdays, Valentines and Anniversaries are not quests to see if we can find the perfect present yet again.

  3. Sometimes we are not thinking about you. Live with it.

  4. Sunday = sports. It’s like the full moon or the changing of the tides. Let it be.

  5. Don’t cut your hair. Ever! Long hair is always more attractive than short hair. One of the big reasons guys fear getting married is that married women always cut their hair, and by then you’re stuck with her.

  6. Shopping is NOT a sport, and no, we are never going to think of it that way.

  7. Crying is blackmail.

  8. Ask for what you want. Let us be clear on this one: Subtle hints do not work! Strong hints do not work! Obvious hints do not work! Just say it.

  9. We don’t remember dates. Mark birthdays and anniversaries on a calendar. Remind us frequently beforehand.

  10. Most guys own three pairs of shoes – tops. What makes you think we’d be any good at choosing which pair, out of thirty, would look good with your frock?

  11. Yes and No are perfectly acceptable answers to almost every question.

  12. Come to us with a problem only if you want help solving it. That’s what we do. Sympathy is what your girlfriends are for.

  13. A headache that lasts for 17 months is a problem. See a doctor.

  14. Check your oil! Please.

  15. Anything we said 6 months ago is inadmissible in an argument. In fact all comments become null and void after 7 days.

  16. If you won’t dress like the Victoria’s Secret girls, don’t expect us to act like soap opera guys.

  17. If you think you’re fat, you probably are. Don’t ask us. We refuse to answer.

  18. If something we said can be interpreted two ways, and one of the ways makes you sad or angry, we meant the other one.

  19. Let us ogle. We are going to look anyway; it’s genetic.

  20. You can either ask us to do something or tell us how you want it done. Not both. If you already know best how to do it, just do it yourself.

  21. Whenever possible, please say whatever you have to say during commercials.

  22. Christopher Columbus did not need directions, and neither do we.

  23. The relationship is never going to be like it was the first two months we were going out. Get over it and quite whining to your girlfriends.

  24. ALL men see in only 16 colours, like Windows default settings. Peach, for example, is a fruit, not a colour. Pumpkin is also a fruit. We have no idea what mauve is.

  25. If it itches, it will be scratched. We do that.

  26. We are not mind readers and we never will be. Our lack of mind-reading ability is not proof of how little we care about you.

  27. If we ask what is wrong and you say ‘nothing’, we will act like nothing’s wrong. We know you are lying, but it is just not worth the hassle.

  28. If you ask a question you don’t want an answer to, expect an answer you don’t want to hear.

  29. When we have to go somewhere, absolutely anything you wear is fine. Really.

  30. Don’t ask us what we’re thinking about unless you are prepared to discuss such topics as navel lint, the shotgun formation, or monster trucks.

  31. You have enough clothes. You have enough clothes.

  32. You have too many shoes. You have too many shoes.

  33. Foreign films are best left to foreigners. (Unless it’s Bruce Lee or some war flick where it doesn’t really matter what the hell they’re saying anyway).

  34. It is neither in your best interest or ours to take the quiz together. No it doesn’t matter which quiz.

  35. BEER is as exciting for us as handbags are for you.

  36. Thank you for reading this. Yes, I know, I have to sleep on the couch tonight, but did you know we really don’t mind that, it’s like camping.

  37. I am in shape. ROUND is a shape.

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CRIMESTOPPERS

If you have information about any crime, phone

CRIMESTOPPERS on 0800 555111

Your call is free. You do not have to give your name. You may receive a reward

SHOPMOBILITY

Brent Cross:- 020 8202 1702. Operates 7 days a week as follows:-

Mon – Fri. 10am – 5.45pm. Sat. 9am – 5.45pm Sun. 11am – 5pm.

Watford Church Street:- 01923 211020. Operates 7 days a week from the

Church Car Park (separate car-park on the ground floor) as follows:- Mon. – Sat. 10am – 5pm Sun. 11am – 5pm. Telephone to book at busy times.

One problem experienced here is that the Shopmobility Car Park, which nearly always has spaces available , is accessed from Church Car Park, which is frequently full. You may need to drive alongside the front of the queue and persuade someone to let you into the queue and convince them that you are not ‘queue jumping’.

Watford Asda Superstore:- 01923 800590. Operates 5 days a week from the store car-park as follows:- Mon. – Fri. 10am – 5pm

Uxbridge:- 01895 271510. Now operating 5 days a week from the new ‘Chimes’ Building:- Mon. – Fri. 9am – 5pm. From early April it will also be opening on Saturdays.

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ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

At the A.G.M. approval was given to the appointment of the following people taking various responsibilities within the Association.

Mr Alan Kimber as Editor of the ‘Echo’. Alan can be contacted at 2 Maycroft, or by telephone on 020 8866 1272 and by email at alankimber@onetel.net.uk and he will look forward to receiving your articles and information to be included in the ‘Echo’. Please send information to Alan at any time for consideration for the next edition.

Mr Robert Symes. Robert will be responsible for the area west of Joel Street and north of the Pinner Road.

Mrs Erika Kimber. Erika will be responsible for the area east of Joel Street and south of the Pinner Road.

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YOUR RIGHT TO WANDER in ENGLAND

The biggest change in countryside law for 50 years was passed by Parliament in 2000 and will be in operation by the end of 2005. It is the new ‘Countryside and Rights of Way Act’ that will give us all a much better access to mountainsides, open moorland, downland, open heathland and also all registered common land in England and Wales. New Ordnance Survey Explorer maps will show the areas where we may walk at will and where we may not walk, except on established rights of way. The mapping process for this is already under way and draft maps have already been produced for two areas, namely the South East of England and the ‘lower North-West with the South and ‘upper North-West becoming available in September / October this year other provisional maps will also follow up to Spring 2004. Already Walkers’ organisations such as the Ramblers Association along with farmers and landowners have been studying the draft maps and the Countryside Agency has also been trying to encourage comments from individuals. The consultation period for the South-East and lower North-West is now closed but others will begin as soon as the draft maps are out.

Draft maps, once published, can be consulted in public libraries and on the internet with each consultation period being open for about three months. In all there are to be eight mapping areas and the issue dates are as follows.

Area

Draft Map issue date

Prov. Map issue date

Area

Draft Map issue date

Prov. Map issue date

1

South East

11-11-01

28-07-02

5

North East

29-01-03

18-08-03

2

Lower North-West

11-11-01

30-09-01

6

South West

27-03-03

27-10-03

3

South

03-09-02

28-04-03

7

West

27-06-03

23-02-04

4

Upper North-West

30-10-02

16-06-03

8

East

02-09-03

25-03-04

Conclusive maps are to be expected six to twelve months after provisional maps, depending on the number of appeals received.

Countryside Agency 0845 100 3298 or www.countryside.gov.uk

Ramblers Association 020 7339 8500 or www.ramblers.org.uk

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QUEEN’S JUBILEE

It was with great regret that our plans to celebrate the 50th anniversary did not take place. We had hoped to light a beacon on Haste Hill, joining the chain of beacons throughout the country. However, the financial cost of a beacon was beyond our means. Plans to hold a Treasure Hunt and family picnic failed to come about, when your committee could not get public support. We tried but it appeared that most people simply were not interested. We were very disappointed.

However, lots of people went up to London and joined in the celebrations in the Mall. I believe the extent of the Jubilee celebrations took many people by surprise. It was being put about by the ‘chattering classes’ that British people did not wish to celebrate. Did they get it wrong !!! Millions of ordinary British people, and others, had a great time.

Perhaps we can do better for the Diamond Jubilee. Okay.

Michael Thatcher

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1902 - 2002

12th September 2002

Those of us who were fortunate enough to be invited to the centenary celebrations of Mount Vernon Hospital enjoyed a garden party in delightful surroundings. I am sure there are many people, like me, who didn’t know of the existence of the lovely garden behind the original hospital block and the weather couldn’t have been kinder. The Rev. George Cobb, the Hospital Chaplain, conducted the short service and Major Richard Morton, who is the grandson of the founder of Mount Vernon, planted a commemorative tree. Major Morton also gave a most interesting insight into the early history and development of the hospital, which, as he explained, also played a large part in his own formative years. Bob Holness judged a competition on display in the building to which the majority of the wards and departments had entered and the Mayor of Hillingdon, Cllr. Josephine Barrett cut the celebration cake. Most importantly the Chairman of Hillingdon Hospital, Steve Coventry, went on record stressing the importance and continuation of Mount Vernon in future plans.

Margot Barnikel

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NORTHWOOD & DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

……is alive and kicking, especially the over 50s Ladies Keep Fit section! Despite the inconvenience of losing their central location at Frithwood School recently, the organisation remains active and lively even though their activities have had to be dispersed to several locations in Northwood and Northwood Hills. The intrepid band of committee members and organisers are determined to keep their members; and the wide variety of activities available, ranging from Keep Fit, Rambling, to Scrabble and Bridge etc. the list is considerable. All guaranteed to keep the little grey cells and muscles working. This Association is all about ‘doing things’ and not just talking about it. Want to know more? Your Residents Association will be co-operating, by providing information about committee members, and a programme of popular recreational and interesting hobbies and pastimes. Your Chairman, Mike Thatcher, has all the information. The apply direct, contact Maureen Watkins, Hon. Sec. on 020 8868 5791 or email on mew@mwatkins2.freeserve.co.uk

Councillor David Bishop.

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CONSERVATION / ENVIRONMENTAL

We have been informed that various bodies have monies available for local community groups like us, to bid to finance activities and projects that enhance the local community. Anyone who has any ideas, please let us know. There are obviously constraints, and conditions, but if we don’t try we will get nothing.

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PUBLIC TOILETS

It is now some considerable time since the Council blocked access to the Public Toilets on Northwood Hills Railway Bridge. This has caused inconvenience and distress to many people of this community, especially to those of the older generation. Information came to your committee that our case for a new Public Toilet had been approved, but was then rejected in favour of a site in another ward. Enquiries were made at the Council and Mr Jones of the Environmental Department stated that our information was incorrect. At no time was Northwood Hills top, or near the top, of the replacement installation list. It would appear that Hayes Town Centre is due to be awarded the installation. The case for Northwood Hills was again put, quoting a major factor, i.e. the large percentage of elderly persons in this area. Mr Jones stated that Hayes Town had just as many!!!!!

Northwood Hills Resident’s Association will continue to campaign for Public Toilet facilities to be restored to our community.

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HILLINGDON HOSPITAL CAR PARK CHARGES

From 11th May the charges for parking at Hillingdon Hospital are as follows:-

From 8am – 6pm every day.

0 – 10 minutes No Charge

10minutes – 30 minutes 60p

30minutes – 1 hour £1.10

1 hour – 1 ½ hours £1.60

1 ½ hours – 2 hours £2.10

2 hours and beyond £2.70

From 6pm – 8am £1.70 fixed charge

There are also 45 places for disabled drivers in various places around the hospital.

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DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

Road Stewards Gathering 6th February 2003

A.G.M. 29th April 2003

Committee Meetings November 27th 2002

January 22nd 2003, March 26th 2003, May 28th 2003

Road Stewards are reminded that they have the right to attend and participate on matters. We welcome your attendance.

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JUNE 1861

Already the Confederate States of America were in trouble. The ‘Anaconda Plan’, which resulted in the land and sea blockade of the Southern States, was beginning to bite and it was necessary to break the blockade. The South began looking abroad for armaments and also a navy.

Earlier in 1861 the South had sent an unusually large crop of cotton to England as collateral for overseas finance. This was in the expectation of war that in fact broke out just a few weeks later. This cotton, which amounted to approximately 3.5 million bales, was transported on Merseyside registered shipping to the Port of Liverpool. The centre of the cotton trade was in Lancashire and Liverpool was its largest port.

In June 1861 a former merchant captain by the name of James Bulloch arrived in Liverpool from the State of Georgia. His task was to set up an undercover operation the result of which would be the formation of a Confederate navy.

Great Britain had however introduced the Foreign Enlistment Act that was intended to enforce British neutrality in the war. This did not stop Bulloch as he insisted that "The mere building of a ship within her Majesty's (Queen Victoria) dominions is no offence, whatever the intent of the parties, because the offence is not the building but the equipping."

The first ship to be completed for the Confederate navy was the Florida and it sailed out of the Mersey before the Federals could raise the alarm.

Meanwhile, the North's representative in Liverpool, Thomas Dudley was not sitting idly by. He received intelligence that a project known as ‘Job No. 290’ was rapidly nearing completion at Laird's Yard, Birkenhead, directly across the Mersey from Liverpool. He had Bulloch followed but Bulloch managed to evade his pursuers. By the beginning of 1862 everybody knew that ‘290’ was going to be 'a privateer of the Southern government'. The ‘290’ was 220' long with a beam of 32' and weighed 1000 tons. She had three raked masts and two decks of Danzig fir with oak reinforcements under the gun positions.

Although basically a sailing ship she also had twin horizontal condensing engines that were capable of a top speed of 13 knots. This information was reported to the British Government. On July 29 1862 the Crown issued an order to search and possibly seize the ship, now having been given the name Enrica.

By the time the officials arrived however, the Enrica had slipped her moorings to go for ‘sea trials’. She however made full speed to the Azores where she took on her guns, 300 barrels of gunpowder, several cases of shot and 200 tons of coal.

Soon the steamer Bahama arrived with Bulloch and Commander Raphael Semmes on board. The Confederate flag was hoisted on the Enrica and the Articles of Commission read. Thus the Enrica became arguably the most famous warship of the Confederacy – the C.S.S. Alabama. Of the crew there were 46 Britons out of a total of 120. There were two British officers, one being the prize-master George Fullam who was in fact still a part- time member of the Royal Navy Reserve and thus a professional sailor.

The Alabama's armament consisted of 8 guns - forward was a large Blakely 110 pounder, a Dahigren 8-inch smoothbore gun amidships and three 32-pounder both port and starboard.

The first action was on 5th September 1862 when the Alabama attacked a Federal whaling fleet in the Azores and over the following fortnight captured and destroyed eight whalers, one schooner and a supply ship.

Semmes then headed for the waters off New England and Newfoundland and in October destroyed another eight vessels. He then headed south into the Caribbean and finally docked in Galveston in January 1863.

By the end of March the Alabama had sunk another 14 ships including the U.S.S. Hatteras. Semmes again headed south and patrolled the coast of Brazil and in the next three months captured 15 ships before heading for Cape Town.

The Alabama arrived at Saldanha Bay, 60 miles northeast of Cape Town on the 29~ July. Semmes headed towards Cape Town and as he entered the harbour captured the Sea Bride. This was witnessed by a large contingent of townspeople who had gathered to welcome them.

All was quite normal for almost two months, with no sinkings or captures. Instead the crew of the Alabama were well entertained by the local ladies and were invited to balls, wine tastings and big game hunting.

The crew was becoming drunk and generally disorderly with their life in Capetown and so the Alabama put to sea again, sailed around the Cape of Good Hope and headed for Singapore and the China seas where she sank or captured another six vessels. After two years at sea she was now worn out. Her boilers were burnt out and machinery was in need of repair.

Semmes headed for Cherbourg in France where he arrived on 11th June 1864 and asked to dock for repairs. As this was stretching the neutrality laws somewhat special permission had to be given by Napoleon III who was on holiday in Biarritz and was thus unavailable, and so Semmes had to wait. On the 14~ June the U.S.S. Kearsarge steamed into the harbour. The Kearsarge had infringed neutrality laws by picking up Irish volunteers for the Federal army and Semmes protested so the Kearsarge was required to leave port and she promptly steamed out of Cherbourg, but stopped just outside the breakwater.

Semmes held a Council of War and decided to attack the Kearsarge. He then sent out a French picket to formally throw down the gauntlet. Unfortunately Semmes did not know that in the meantime the Kearsarge had armoured itself by draping anchor chains over its sides and that his own gunpowder was damp and his ammunition was not of the best quality after so much time at sea. The Alabama steamed out of Cherbourg and at a distance of 7 miles off the coast and at a range of 500 yards engaged the Kearsarge. The battle lasted about 20 minutes and was watched by thousands of Frenchmen who stood on the cliffs around Cherbourg. One of the watchers was Edouard Manet who made many sketches during the conflict. He finally painted the well-known canvas of the battle.

Three shells from the Kearsarge entered the gun port and the damage caused the Alabama to list to starboard and she began to sink. The order was given to abandon ship. Nine men died from the Alabama but a British steam yacht managed to pick up the survivors including Semmes.

During the battle an l00lb shell from the Alabama hit the stem of the Kearsarge but failed to explode. If it had done so the result may well have been somewhat different. Semmes was given a hero's welcome in Southampton and presented with a gilt decorated sword by the Royal Navy. He was befriended by the Vicar of Belsize Park who at his own expense took him to the Swiss Alps to recuperate.

Thus ended the glorious career of the Alabama but it was not the end of British involvement. In 1871 in Geneva the U.S Government obtained a judgement under which the British had to pay $15.5 million in gold in compensation for the Alabama wiping out the Federal merchant fleet. Visitors to the old Town Hall in Geneva can see a plaque in the courtyard giving details of the history of the Alabama and the judgement.

Richard J. Perrin

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Issue 02 last updated 29th October 2006