THE HILLS ECHO

Autumn 2000

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

ON A SAD NOTE

PUB SIGNS

PROJECT MILLENNIUM – SET IN STONE

NORTHWOOD LIONS

NEW ASSOCIATION

MASTS FOR MOBILE TELEPHONES

POLICE HELP LINE

NEW MILLENNIUM 2000/2001

SECTION 106

SHOPS

SHOPMOBILITY

CHAMBER OF TRADE

NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

TALKING NEWSPAPERS

A NOTE FROM YOUR LOCAL POLICE

PINNER ROAD JUNIOR SCHOOL

NER ROAD JUNIOR SCHOOL

WITHOUT YOUR HELP IT WON’T HAPPEN

COMMUNICATION

JOEL STREET FIRST

POLICING IN NORTHWOOD HILLS

POSITION OF HON. SECRETARY

THEATRES – JUST FOR FUN

OUT AND ABOUT

CALLING ALL CAT LOVERS

ADVICE FOR CRIME PREVENTION IN THE AUTUMN

ODD FACTS

Return to top

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

The year 2000 has arrived and there is still a debate as to whether or not the New Millennium has started. Some people like to say it commenced on the 1st January 2000; others are adamant that it commences on the 1st January 2001. It just shows that people have differing views on most matters.

This year has seen the retirement, as Chairman, of Lishman Easby. He was elected in 1983 and served this Association, and indeed all of the local community, well. As you may know, we have a membership of something short of 2000 households, good, but not the coverage we would wish, and Lishman has headed our campaigns in the various contentious matters over the years. We have not lost his services as he has agreed to remain on the Committee and continues to deal with planning matters.

I was elected Chairman of the Association at the A.G.M. in May and hope to continue the good example set by Lishman.

I have lived in Northwood Hills since 1982 with my wife Elizabeth. Our children have now left home, married and continue their new lives in various parts of the country. I have served as the Association Hon. Treasurer, and for several years have been Co-ordinator of the Road Stewards. Latterly, I represent the Association on the Hillingdon Police and Community Consultative Group and more recently on the Police Advisory Group. As the Association representative I have recently attended the London Borough of Hillingdon Strategy meeting debating ‘Parking Problems in Hillingdon’. Various topics were discussed in a general Borough wide context. The Council hope to produce recommendations / report soon. What they decide will be of great interest to us all. The next step will be to deal with local areas in the Borough when the Association hopes to be involved and have, with others such as local businesses and shopkeepers, some degree of control of what will be proposed and later decided.

I have also recently attended meetings about the future of Northwood and Pinner Hospital where the local views were sought on various requirements as to the amount of services that should or should not be available on that site. As I understand, talks are continuing whether or not to combine the Health Centre and the Hospital into one unit.

The future of Harefield Hospital has been another item on my agenda. Views of people differ so much. It is argued that the closure of the Heart complex at the hospital and transfer to a new site in Paddington is the one favoured by the Doctors and Clinicians. A specified Heart unit needs the close assistance and attendance of doctors from other disciplines and this, apparently, is not available at Harefield. It would appear that for Harefield to remain viable as a ‘Heart’ hospital of renown it needs a large general hospital alongside it. That would mean a very large hospital site in Harefield. The authorities and medical people apparently prefer to develop the St. Mary’s Hospital site at Paddington as their preferred choice. Local people and patients appear to have different views. What happens in the end remains, I think, slightly unclear.

On a general note we are all aware of the recent problems experienced by Hillingdon Council. Financial and administrative matters have almost caused the Council to be adjudged bankrupt; this is not a good situation. For a Chief Executive to comment ‘it’s not my fault, my junior council officers did not tell me of the situation’ is simply not good enough. We, as Council Tax payers, employ him to oversee the whole situation. The buck stops with him. He is paid to know what is or is not happening and then to take the appropriate action. Too many of the council officers actions are simply not getting the attention they require.

We now have a new Leader of the Council, we obviously wish him well, but warn him we are watching and will act if necessary.

Joel Street Farm -  This Association has been informed that the new owners of the farm and fields, the Synagogue, have plans for the site. I have written several times to the Synagogue but have failed to receive a reply. We remain vigilant and will monitor the situation keenly. The Federation of Synagogues have to get Council Planning Permission etc. for future activities on the site and as of the 1st October we have not been notified of any .

I would, as a last matter, like to think all our Road Stewards for the truly wonderful assistance they give ‘you’ and us. Without them we would grind to a halt. You may have noticed we are a little late with this issue of the ‘Echo’. It’s the old story, not enough people to do all the jobs we would like to do. If you have time to help us to help others please let us know. The last six months has been very difficult for some, we have experienced a number of physical and personal problems which has left us rather behind in certain things.

If you can act as a Road Steward or in some other way help the Committee please let us know.

I wish all residents a happy Christmas and a warm welcome for the New Millennium 2001. - Michael J. Thatcher

Return to top

ON A SAD NOTE

It is with great sadness that this Association has to announce the death of its Honorary Secretary, Mrs Edna Holmes. Mrs Holmes died in hospital after a severe fall in her home at the beginning of October. The Officers and Committee extend their warmest sympathies to Mrs Holmes family at this tragic time.

Return to top

PUB SIGNS

If you want to know the origin of the name of the Wetherspoon pub next to Northwood Hills station – The William Jolle – you will have to go in and look on the right hand side for the excellent explanation. This is because, although I know, I am not going to deprive them of some possible custom. When it comes to other well-known pub signs I am not so hard-hearted. In many cases there is dispute as to the correct origin, so what follows is, in some cases, my own preferred version. In bygone times, particularly when most of the population were illiterate, all kinds of tradesmen’s signs were commonplace – the pawnbrokers 3 golden balls, the striped barber’s pole that I remember from my childhood. Such signs were optional for most trades, but the situation was different for innkeepers. As early as 1393 London publicans were compelled by law to display signs and other towns followed suit.

The Romans used the display of a bush to indicate an inn and the earliest English signs were linked with agriculture and brewing. Thus we have the Plough, the Wheatsheaf and the Barleycorn. With the growth of the wool trade in certain areas, we find the Woolpack, the Fleece and the Packhorse.

The strangest class of signs is probably that where two incongruous things are joined together. In 1707 fun was made of such combinations in the publication The British Apollo:-

I’m amused at the signs

As I pass through the town

To see the odd mixture

A Magpie and Crown

The Whale and the Crow

The Razor and Hen

The Leg and Seven Stars

The Scissors and Pen….

Many of these odd combinations arose in a simple enough way. Two innkeepers traded long and successfully under their respective signs and eventually decided to unite their interests, perhaps through their children’s marriage or whatever. Neither wished to abandon his sign, so we finish up with the Hare and Flatiron. Certain modern chains of small brewers have taken to this as a marketing gimmick – the Frog and Frothfinders, which turned up in Pinner, for example. A very common type of sign arose from the innkeeper borrowing the heraldic arms of the prominent local noble family. As the best known local sign it would attract the wayfarer to his hostelry. Hence we have the Crown, the King’s Arms, the Lygon Arms, the Red Lion, the Talbot, the Eagle and Child (Earl of Derby). Sometimes the supporters of the shield, one of its charges or its back ground was chosen – hence the Unicorn, the Crescent, the Checkers (heraldic cheque). Sometimes these heraldic elements were corrupted. The Talbot (a heraldic dog) became the spotted Dog: the Crusader’s Crescent became the Half Moon.

Historical events, particularly military ones, explain the Lord Nelson, the Admiral Rodney, the Waterloo Arms, and the Royal Oak (where Charles 11 hid after Worcester). The Goat and Compasses, which dates from the Commonwealth period, is a corruption of the Puritan motto ‘God encompasses us!’. This is heightened by the fact that the reverent 17th and 18th century pronunciation of God was ‘Goad’. The Elephant and Castle is held by some to be the corruption of Eleanor of Castile, I believe it to be what it says – an Indian elephant and its fighting howdah, which was known quite early and even existed as an armorial device. The Bag o’Nails started life as the Bacchanals’ the Bill and Mouth was Boulogne Mouth (i.e. harbour), where Henry V111 met with some success in 1544. Of the many classes of signs of which mention has not been made, I will feature that of the ‘joke’. The Silent Woman, represented either decapitated, with her head under her arm or with her lips padlocked together is one such. Another is the Honest Lawyer, represented equally decapitated. The Hat and Tun (a barrel) owed its origin to a former host called Hatton. As you can see there is a wealth of social history hidden in many traditional pub signs. Alan Kimber

Return to top

PROJECT MILLENNIUM – SET IN STONE

Those of us privileged enough to be able to fly to a variety of destinations around the world, are often asked ‘do we want an aisle or window seat’? How many elect for a window seat, and why? The reason I ask is because, this year I experienced the rare opportunity of flying (occupying a good window seat) from Athens to Heathrow on a cloudless day, and the views were magnificent! The pilot only explained our route briefly, at the commencement of the flight. I remembered the mention of Venice, and sure enough recognised the familiar inverted ‘S’ of the Grand Canal below. For the remainder of the four hour flight, over the Balkans, the Adriatic, the Alps, Switzerland and France, I hadn’t a clue as to where we were, although the view over the changing landscape was fantastic! An experience not be forgotten. Although we circled over Biggin Hill, after crossing the English Channel (in 5 minutes) my first recognisable landmark, as we started our descent, was Tower Bridge and the River Thames. Now you might ask, what has this got to do with the title of this passage? Well, being able to identify landmarks is a very reassuring feeling, and does place a location firmly on the map. We have all striven hard to place Northwood Hills on the map. Have you noticed that aircraft landing at Heathrow area routed more frequently around North London? It could possibly be to ease the relentless pressure of noise on the south. Put yourself in the place of those passengers up- there, wondering where they are, and looking down at us. If we were to place white concrete slabs at ground level on Haste Hill, to form the words ‘NORTHWOOD HILLS 2000’, in letters 30 feet tall, they would require no maintenance, except regular grass mowing as usual, and the whole World would know, where they are, because it would stand out, and Northwood Hills would be well and truly on the map! Simple, inexpensive and unique! How many other towns would copy us? But don’t take any notice of me, the man’s mad! Cllr. David Bishop

Return to top

NORTHWOOD LIONS

Yet another Northwood Lions Carnival has come and gone, much to the relief of the club. A behind the scenes analysis showed that well over three hundred hours had been spent organising this event. We would like to thank all residents who supported us. A total of about £1600 was raised, which considering the conditions, was an excellent result. At the risk of repeating comments in previous articles all this money will be used for charitable purposes, none going towards the administrative costs of Northwood Lions Club. The majority of the money will be used to take disadvantaged children to Thorpe Park and a fish and chip supper for elderly people in Northwood / Northwood Hills.

Among our other commitments in the area are the regular bingo sessions at James Court, arranging trips to local concerts and providing financial support for a live at home scheme run collectively by local churches.

Unfortunately the recent petrol shortage forced us to cancel a lunch that had been arranged at St Johns Court. This was disappointing for all, because these occasions are often the only opportunity for some residents to meet other people on a social basis.

In case you think that Northwood Lions do nothing but work, we do also have an active social life, with visits to classical and jazz concerts, theatres, quiz nights (which we never win), go away on short weekend breaks together and attend a number of social functions organised by other Lions clubs.

Now comes the commercial, we are always looking for additional members. If you would like to help the local community and have some fun at the same time come and see us at our meetings which take place at James Court, (by the ‘Iron Bridge’ at the corner of the Pinner Road and Northwood High Street), every first and third Wednesday, starting at 8.00 p.m. We will be pleased to see you.

Return to top

NEW ASSOCIATION

St. Vincent’s Tenants & Residents Association has been formed for people living in the Fore Street/Wiltshire Lane area. Our Association wishes them well and will give them assistance in matters that affects us both. It is interesting to know that Hillingdon Council has assisted the new association both in financial and administrative ways. Perhaps the council will extend this assistance to other Residents Associations. It may be that our Association, which does not differentiate between Residents and Tenants will not be thought suitable for any assistance. As you will know we accept as members ANY person residing or having a business in Northwood Hills area. No discrimination with us. All are welcome. - Michael Thatcher - Chairman

Return to top

MASTS FOR MOBILE TELEPHONES

It was of great concern to a lot of people when a mobile telephone mast was erected on Joel Street Roundabout in May. Although the Council had written to a small number of residents living around the junction requesting comment most people were taken by surprise when the mast was actually erected. Our local Councillors had been actively negotiating, only two days earlier, as to the possibility of a different site and they were as surprised as the rest of us. The problem is that the telephone companies have a legal right to install masts of under 15 metres in height where ever they wish. There is no Planning Permission required. We, as an association had been mislead by the Council who had informed us in writing that a Planning Meeting would be held and this never happened. The Government have now said planning permission requirements will be in place in 2001. So we are stuck with our mast. We hope medical fears will not become a reality.

Return to top

POLICE HELP LINE

People requiring assistance on a NON-URGENT MATTER from the police are encouraged to use a new Help Line Number020 8246 1501 Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm. You may also contact the Help Line via the internet at all@hillingdonnhw.co.uk We are informed that it is now operational.

999 calls remain for URGENT assistance, crimes, suspects.

Many people are dialing 999 for non urgent matters and they block the telephone system.

Return to top

NEW MILLENNIUM 2000/2001

A member of this association has expressed, what seems to be, a popular sentiment in that they wish to commemorate the New Millennium (whenever you believe the event to be, 1999/2000 or 2000/2001) and made a donation to be so used.

We are finding it very difficult to come to a decision as to how to commemorate this time in our history.

IDEAS

a) A clock on a local building

b) Equipment for Northwood & Pinner Hospital (if it continues).

c) Inscribed pavement plaques

d) An event ie street party in Joel Street

e) Open air concert party / event on the recreation ground in summer 2001.

Ideas are welcome. Help would be warmly encouraged and accepted. Let us know your views. We would help to finance the agreed event/purchase by means of a Public Subscription.

Return to top

SECTION 106

Members will have read in the Gazette about the controversy surrounding the local implementation of Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning act. This section allows local authorities to charge a sum of money to developers when planning approval is given.

This provision has been criticised locally and in an interview with the Gazette our M.P. John Wilkinson describes it as ‘nothing short of bribery and unethical’. This, I understand, is based on the fact that an offer of a substantial sum of money may tempt Committee Members to approve an application that would otherwise have been refused. This fear seems to be confirmed by Cllr. Jim O’Neil, Chairman of the Planning Committee who, according to the Gazette, said that development in Ickenham would have been refused if money had not been on offer. If this should be the case it must be both wrong and immoral.

Section 106 has been implemented several times recently in our area and the money set aside to cover school places. On the face of it this seems reasonable, more dwellings are likely to increase the number of children in the area. However, I wrote protesting when I heard that the money from the development in Tolcarne Drive was allocated to John Penrose School in Harefield in spite of the fact that we have a school in the same street as the development. In a reply from the Planning Dept. I was told that their policy is to allocate the money to the school most in need of help at the time. This policy is not entirely unreasonable and perhaps we should not be too parochial when help is given to the school most in need even if outside our boundary. No doubt our local schools will benefit in time. I understand that Coteford School (Eastcote) has already benefited.

Whatever one may think about Section 106 we must remember it is part of an Act of Parliament and therefore outside local jurisdiction. We should, therefore, concern ourselves with its fair and honest implementation. Clearly if a planning decision is influenced by an offer of money from a developer it must be regarded as wrong and in fact dishonest. Decisions on planning applications must be made solely on the acceptability of the proposals and their impact on the community. It is important that any monetary decisions are considered only after approval has been given.

When the Borough receive an application it is investigated by the Planning Officers and submitted to the Planning sub-Committee with a meeting agenda which includes a detailed report and recommendation. The decision whether to approve or refuse the application is made at their meeting to which the public can attend as observers.

However, in public administration, and I can claim experience at national level. Transparent honesty, as we called it, is of paramount importance. It is not enough for officers and councillors to be honest; they must be seen to be honest. I personally have confidence in their complete integrity but I feel that residents would welcome some assurance.

More Regulations.

It is sometimes thought that our freedom is in jeopardy from an increase in regulations, whether they come from the E.U., Government or Council. It is, therefore, with some trepidation that I suggest that we need more. I am, however, referring exclusively to planning. As you will know all new buildings including extensions to existing buildings are subject to Building Regulations but not all extensions require planning permission. Those under a maximum floor area may proceed without permission. This is, of course, fine for someone wishing to extend his house but may not be so for his next-door neighbour. The area around Hillside Crescent and Hillside Rise is particularly affected. In the worst case a house has been extended right up to the boundary of the house next door. Due to the small floor area and the fact that it is only one storey planning permission was not required. However, although the extension is only one storey the ground level of the house next door is vastly lower, which makes the extension almost equivalent to two storeys. The house at a lower level is, therefore, overshadowed which causes extreme distress to the occupier. The developer has acted within the law and it seems the Planning Dept. are powerless to intervene. Protests from our M.P., Councillors, this Association and others have been to no avail. Why should residents be made to suffer this way, and why is our Council unable to intervene? I have written to the Head of Planning Services about this and with particular reference to similar proposals in the same area. I believe that the Council Planning Dept. should have greater power to protect us from selfish developers. This would mean legislation and more power to the Council, this I would welcome. I am grateful to our M.P. John Wilkinson who has supported our case and written to John Prescott, The Secretary of State, saying that a change in the law is overdue and asking for his departments help.

Apart from the detrimental affect on neighbouring homes it affects the general appearance of areas such as Hillside Crescent. This is particular relevant to side extensions which can produce a terracing effect. Most of our streets were originally well planned but with houses that do not lend themselves to anything but the most modest extension.

Return to top

SHOPS

We continue our efforts to maintain the viability of our shopping parades. We seem to have achieved some success and the Borough Planning Dept. has helped considerably by refusing non-retail outlets. There have, unfortunately, been cases where we have objected to the change of use to restaurant, the Council have refused the application only to be overruled on appeal by the Planning Inspectorate (DOE). At present Joel Street has a fair selection of useful shops but I understand some are struggling. Their success depends largely on the support they get from us, the residents. Our shops cannot survive by selling only the item we happened to forget on our weekly pilgrimage to Sainsbury’s. Our retailers serve us well; perhaps we should support them more.

Lishman Easby – Association Planning Officer

Return to top

HILLINGDON POLICE AND COMMUNITY CONSULTATION GROUP

Next meeting15th November 2000 at the Civic Centre, Uxbridge

at 7.30pm

Speaker – Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, Peter Stevens

Any questions you may have can be put to the Commissioner and hopefully answered

Return to top

SHOPMOBILITY

Brent Cross:- 020 8202 1702. Operates 7 days a week as follows:-

Mon – Fri. 10am – 5.45pm. Sat. 9am – 5.45pm Sun. 11am – 5pm.

Watford Church Street:- 01923 211020. Operates 7 days a week from the

Church Car Park (separate car-park on the ground floor) as follows:- Mon. – Sat. 10am – 5pm Sun. 11am – 5pm

Watford Asda Superstore:- 01923 800590. Operates 5 days a week from the store car-park as follows:- Mon. – Fri. 10am – 5pm

Uxbridge:- 01895 271510. Operates 5 days a week from the Grainges car-park as follows:- Mon. – Fri. 9am – 4.45pm. You are advised to book ahead, to be sure a suitable wheelchair (assorted electric or ‘push’) is available. The service is looking for volunteers who could give them a few hours a week. NB. On the 6th March 2001 this service will move to the Chimes Building and then will operate Monday to Saturday and will have twice as much room for their equipment.

Return to top

CHAMBER OF TRADE

The Northwood and Pinner Chamber of Trade will be meeting to discuss a new format for the future.

What do the retailers require from the new committee?

They have meetings with the Post Office Advisory Committee, Telephone Advisory Committee, Crime Prevention Panel and Planning & Parking.

How do you want you shopping centres improved? The Chamber of Trade functions to help shoppers as well as businesses. Our secretary Angela Reid on 020 8868 8340 will be happy to assist you.

Return to top

NORTHWOOD FOOTBALL CLUB

Northwood Football Club, is situated in Northwood Park, Chestnut Avenue, Northwood. The current clubhouse was opened in 1985, and is now going to be extended, due to the success of the club, at all levels. The First Team, play in the Ryman League Division One, subsequent to being promoted in the season 1999/2000. They also won the Associate Members Trophy for the second time, and were also finalists in the Middlesex Senior Cup. Three other sides are fielded on Saturdays. The Reserve Team, which is part of the first team squad. The Third Team, which is for up and coming youngsters, and finally the Veterans side, which is for players over the age of 35, but who still enjoy a run about on a Saturday afternoon. All sides play in competitive Leagues. Sundays are for Youth teams, sides ranging from under 8’s to under 18’s, enjoy their football on Sundays at Northwood Football Club. Each team have their own manager and coach. Training is normally on one evening per week and on Saturday mornings. Also on match days (including Sundays) the kitchen is open for hot snacks and beverages. We have a bar that sells bar snacks, sweets etc., and also all types of adult drinks to quench your thirst after the games. New to the Club is the website, it can be located on www.northwoodfc.com this gives up to date information on all the teams at Northwood Football Club. Why not come and visit us, not just for football, we also have an excellent social side.

This newsletter is prepared during the school holidays and at the beginning of the new school year. As I am sure residents will appreciate this is a difficult time to get up to date information from our local schools. However, Northwood School sends me regular copies of their newsletter and the information below has been extracted from these.

Return to top

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL

May 2000

Advanced readers in Year 7 to benefit from a Reading Club Grant awarded by ‘Education Extra’.

Some pupils participated in a concert held at the Royal Festival Hall in April.

The school is still collecting tokens for ‘Books for Schools’ and Maths Sofware.

The PE Dept. is now advocating the use of hard hats for pupils playing cricket.

June 2000

Received nearly 3,000 ‘Tesco’s Software for Schools’ tokens, all were used well

Miranda Hall and Jenny Cox, selected for the Middlesex Under 16’s football.

School discouraging pupils from bringing mobile phones and valuables.

Requesting more tokens for ‘Books for School’ and ‘Maths Software’.

July 2000

Several pupils did well in the Borough Maths Challenge.

Year 7 Cricket Team won the Borough Championship.

Return to top

TALKING NEWSPAPERS

Do you know anyone who finds it difficult, or impossible, to read the newspaper due to failing sight? If you do make sure they are aware of the ‘Talking Newspapers’.

Extracts from the local newspaper the ‘Gazette’ are recorded at the Civic Centre and to receive copies of this you would need to contact Social Services, People with Disabilities Team on 01895 250959 / 250960. For information about National Newspapers on tape the contact address is National Recording Centre, Browning Road, Heathfield, East Sussex. TN21 8DB or ring 01435 866102 for details.

Return to top

A NOTE FROM YOUR LOCAL POLICE

An Update of Policing in Hillingdon: I visited Devon, on holiday, this summer and read a local paper, which spoke of lack of Police and how the public were affected. It reminded me that staff shortages extend beyond the Metropolitan Police District, Hillingdon and Northwood. Recruitment is a national problem and the cost of living in London has caused some movement of officers from the capital, with minimal effect on the communities in which they moved to serve, and from the Police Service in general. Your Residents’ Association, local Councillors and MPs have informed our new Commissioner, Sir John Stevens, of the need to stem the reduction of officers in Hillingdon. The next months should see an improvement in the service you receive. PC Jamie Kendall has transferred to East Sussex, on the birth of his son, to his fiancée who lives near Hastings. I know many of you will regret his leaving and wish him well. His departure has placed him in another overstretched constabulary and left myself as the community constable responsible for Northwood Hills, a role I had six years ago. I relish the task of serving you and wish to do so well. Whilst my area has increased most minor crimes will be investigated by the Beat Crimes Squad and all schools will receive the attention of a unit set up for that specific purpose. This will mean that I will have more time to attend to community problems and issues and to be seen working in your area. I continue to work at the Northwood Club, formerly Northwood Boys’ Club, a youth club for young people in your area to promote their good behaviour and development.

Officers from Uxbridge have re-located to work out of Ruislip. This means that Uxbridge town will receive the same attention to which it has become accustomed but that the increased number of Police working out of Ruislip will attend to all problems in Uxbridge, Ruislip and Northwood. These officers are working with vigour and commitment. Northwood Police Station remains closed to public enquiries. This does not affect the service you receive. You cannot pop into your local Police Station for advice but the phone has become the primary source of getting what you need. A new number for obtaining advice will be published and circulated to all homes in the near future. Many crimes have no known suspects and are often reported for insurance purposes or just to let us know what is happening. These crimes can now be reported by phone and often do not require the attendance of an officer. This does not mean that you have been arbitrarily deprived of the opportunity to speak with a Police Officer. You can express this wish and your need will be met. Neighbourhood Watch is on The Internet and newsletters will be published and distributed to co-ordinators as well as being on "The net". Crime figures will continue to be placed in the libraries at Oaklands Gate and Northwood Hills to inform residents of the previous month’s crimes. I will take this opportunity to apologise for my absence during some of the summer and that crime figures for those months will be available in the library by the time you receive this letter. This summer period has seen a decline in community crimes, like burglaries, robberies and motor vehicle crimes. Whilst this may be a seasonal drop your observation and phone calls will have directed Police attention. Keep it up, please!

Malcolm Ruddock PC163XH – Tel 020 8246 1941 (ansafone)

Return to top

PINNER ROAD JUNIOR SCHOOL

In a previous newsletter we published an article from Marion Wilson nee Addison who attended Pinner Road Junior School. Mrs Wilson was trying to arrange a reunion. Well on the 11th June this year the reunion was held and they had a lovely day with plenty of laughs, lots of photographs and plenty of memories. It is hoped to arrange another reunion in a year or so and they would dearly like to track down more ex pupils. If you attended the school (1944-1948) or know of anyone who did please contact Mrs Wilson at 16, Rectory Close, Farnham Royal, Slough, Berks. SL2 3BG.

Return to top

JUST A COUPLE OF HOURS

Do you have just those couple of hours to spare to deliver MEALS ON WHEELS

Based at Ascott Court in Wiltshire Lane this service is staffed by volunteers, but they need your help. Even a few hours a month would be more than welcome. It is only with YOUR help that this valuable service will remain viable. Both drivers and escorts are needed. Please phone either Josie or Pauline on 020 8868 7318 between the hours of 10am and 12noon if you are interested.

Return to top

WITHOUT YOUR HELP IT WON’T HAPPEN

St. Vincent’s Hospital has long been a haven for both children and adults with problems. If the dreams of Anna and Sean Kennedy come true it will continue to be that haven.

Anna and Sean Kennedy are fighting to open a centre for adults with Autism and Asperger’s syndrome in St. Mary’s and Fraser House at the former St. Vincent’s Hospital. When I spoke to Mrs Kennedy she starkly told me that the centre was needed to provide facilities for young people after they have left school, at present their future is bleak, either a mental institution or prison.

Anna and Sean have already had immense success, being the instigators of Hillingdon Manor School in Harlington Road, which caters for children with the problems of autism. They are now tackling the problem of what happens to the youngsters after their school years are over.

The new centre has already had its share of problems, it first opened its doors this summer and within days was vandalised and computer equipment was stolen. The centre already has three residents but its potential is for 15 residents and a further twenty on a daily basis.

The great need now is not just for money, although £20,000 is the figure that is needed to get the centre up and running but also a need for bodies. If your body can spend a few hours scraping wallpaper off walls, painting, scrubbing or the myriad of other tasks that need to be done please contact Mrs Kennedy, either at St. Mary’s Centre on 020 8868 5077 between the hours of 9.30am-4pm or at Hillingdon Manor School on 01895 813679.

Anna and Sean Kennedy have already been nominated for the ‘Unsung Heroes’ awards organised by the Daily Express. Well we need to sing out loud on their behalf.

Margot Barnikel

Return to top

COMMUNICATION

What is this thing called ‘Communication’?

We use it to learn everything from reading and writing to science and maths. We use it to form relationships with others. We use it to express our needs and ideas. Communication is a complex process and we often take it for granted…until it goes wrong! As many as 250,000 children have a Speech and Language difficulty.

The child with a speech problem will be difficult to understand because they mix up the sounds in words or use incorrect sounds or leave sounds out of words. The child with a language problem will have difficulty with understanding or expression and may be unable to follow instruction, be unable to use sentences correctly or be unable to put their ideas into the correct order. The child with a conversational problem cannot follow the rules of conversation and may interrupt inappropriately, talk excessively or not at all or have difficulty making friends.

For some children and their families, these types of difficulties can cause considerable frustration and may result in secondary behavioural problems. These children need early recognition of their difficulties, assessment by trained and experienced professionals, specialist teaching and Speech and Language Therapy.

The families of children with speech and language difficulties also need support to get the right help for their child and to understand what they can do to help.

General guidelines to help with a child’s language environment are:

Speak slowly using short, simple sentences.

Use vocabulary within the child’s experience.

Use repetition and demonstration to check the child has understood.

Encourage the child to communicate, including use of gesture.

Tell the child if misunderstood.

Avoid asking too many questions.

Help the child understand when it is their turn to talk.

Give the child time to listen and respond.

Make talking fun!

If you are concerned about your child’s speech and language development, discuss this with your health visitor, your child’s nursery or class teacher. You may wish to set some specific targets for your child to reach within the next few weeks or months, such as increase vocabulary or sentence length, improved clarity of speech. However, if you or your child are frustrated with their communication skills, it may be time to refer them to a Speech and Language Therapist. Again, you may discuss this with the health visitor, teacher or refer yourself.

Further information is available from:

The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. 020 7613 3854

AFASIC – Overcoming speech impediments. 020 7841 8900

Mrs Sangita Amin, Independent Speech and Language Therapist,

The Northwood Practice 01923 824074

Return to top

JOEL STREET FIRST

Our local High Street, like many others, is having hard time. Competition from distant supermarkets and other large stores is making life difficult for our own Joel Street traders. The loss of our public car-park (under a previous Council), and the closure of our public conveniences, (under the last one), make life awkward for Joel Street shoppers. But this is all the more reason for us all to ‘try Joel Street first’ and to make a real effort to look first at our excellent local shops before travelling to the bigger but more impersonal stores elsewhere. The list of local traders in this issue of ‘The Hills Echo’ shows the range of shops we have, including a ‘real’ butcher, a ‘real’ greengrocer, and a superb hardware and gardening store, to name but a few. There are excellent specialist shops of all kinds. The very least we can do is to try our local shops first. It is a pleasant way to shop too. Service is personal and friendly. If we, the residents, don’t shop locally, who will?

Julie Whelan

Road Steward for Woodford Crescent and Hazelwood Drive

Return to top

POLICING IN NORTHWOOD HILLS

We all understand the need for an efficient police service to assist us to live in a community. Fears of lack of personnel, leading to a further deterioration in the quality of our lives is to continue to question the Metropolitan Police activities. Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, John Stevens, is to attend a ‘speak and answer’ session at the next meeting of the Hillingdon Police and Community Consultative Group on Wednesday 15th November 2000 at 7.30pm at the Civic Centre in Uxbridge. Members of the public are invited to attend. We encourage members of this association to take advantage of this. It is only by showing the Commissioner the depth of our concerns over the lack of resources, he and the Home Secretary are putting into our community that we will achieve a better service.

It is said that the only Police presence on our (Northwood / Northwood Hills) streets for considerable periods is a mobile response car (ie fast police car). We are allocated two Home Beat Officers, one in Northwood, one for Northwood Hills. These officers are, naturally, called away to other areas when activities such as Fuel Crisis…………..matters call for members of police to be concentrated elsewhere. We suffer the lack of assistance in regulating traffic, ………parking inappropriately, street vandalism and unsocial behaviour of some people; all the things that the population need to be regulated in. We are not asking to become a Police State, but we require, indeed demand effective community Policing to assist us in our lives. We are currently paying the Government / Police Service a lot of money in taxes. We require a better demonstration that more of these taxes are spent on US. We understand that we are fortunate to live in a reasonable part of London, however, we require adequate protection and guidance for it to remain that way. Once lost we will never recover the quality of life.

Wednesday 15th November 2000 7.30pm

Civic Centre Uxbridge

Come and lobby the Commissioner

Return to top

POSITION OF HON. SECRETARY

Due to the sad news of the death of Mrs Edna Holmes the position of Hon. Sec. is vacant. The vacancy will be filled at the A.G.M. in 2001, date to be announced in the Spring Edition of the ‘Echo’. In the interim the position of Hon. Sec. will be covered by a previous Hon. Sec. Margot Barnikel. The address and telephone number and email address is on the front cover of this newsletter.

Return to top

THEATRES – JUST FOR FUN

Unravel these anagrams to find the name of 25 London Theatres

1. AMASS BOARDS ……………....………………….

2. A VIOLA PRACTICE ……………………………….

3. BRIC – A – BAN ………….……………………....

4. CLAY CLIPID ………………........……………….

5. CRAB MIDGE ………………........……………….

6. CUMLEY ………………………………...............

7. DALAI PLUM ………………….........…………….

8. DAMNS WHY …………………........…………….

9. DARN ST ………………………………..............

10. DIG GLUE …………………………..........…….

11. EL APHID ………………………………...........

12. FOR NEW SPECIAL …………………………….

13. IRK CRAG ………………………………...........

14. LA POOL ……………………………...........….

15. LOV CID …………………………...........…….

16. MASHY JESTER ……………………..………….

17. MIDI NOON ………………………….......…….

18. MY CODE ………………………………...........

19. NED DRAW PRICE ……………………………….

20. NICER RIOT ………………………………........

21. OLE MUSIC ……………………………….........

22. PHONE XI ……………………..........………….

23. PLACE A ……………………............………….

24. SHE SCUD ………………….........…………….

25. TEN FOUR ……………………..........………….

Answers in the next edition of ‘The Echo’.

Return to top

OUT AND ABOUT

By ‘Stroller’

They come and they go but, thankfully, some stay. I’m referring to the businesses in Joel Street. You would need a weekly column to report on the opening and closing of certain shops in Northwood Hills. In the last issue of ‘The Echo’ I said ‘you need never be hungry in Northwood Hills’. There will be no less than 14 restaurants or take-away’s in the Joel Street area, without including the two public houses that also sell food. There is one Italian Restaurant, which has been established for well over 30 years and by far the longest established, two Pizza, two Chinese, one Thai, One Indian plus an Indian take-away, two fish and chip bars (one selling Kebabs and the other Chinese food) one Wimpey, two Sandwich Bars, and last, but by no means least, Marios Café, a traditional English Café. We also have six shops where you can buy groceries, one Greengrocer and one Butcher.

Northwood Hills is, therefore developing into a centre of International Cuisine that can satisfy every taste and palate. I also understand that behind the dark glass windows of the Sahib Club they also provide food of Eastern Promise. One can only hope there are enough people who can afford to eat out and support these businesses.

Another Betting Shop has opened and also a Security Shop ‘Alert Lock and Safe’.

There are still ten empty premises some of which have been empty for some considerable time and I wonder if there is room for still more restaurants.

I was surprised to see the closure of Victoria Wine, which leaves the field clear for ‘Unwins’, although some of the food stores also sell wines and spirits.

By the state of some of the roads it would appear the Council have not treated the weeds in the roads or on the pavements, so creating the appearance of a Third World Country. If Residents take a pride in where they live they could quite easily treat the weeds outside their homes themselves far more effectively. I, and a few others have done it with a packet of Pathclear.

This summer we have had a mixed bag as far as the weather has been concerned and I wonder what the winter will bring forth? If our footballers can do as well as our cricketers have done we’ll all be happy.

Have a Merry Christmas and may you enjoy good Health in the New Year.

Return to top

CALLING ALL CAT LOVERS

If you love cats and would like to help ‘Cats Protection’ (formerly League) they are always looking for volunteers. Volunteers spend anything from an hour to several days a month and help in many diverse ways, such as fundraising, driving cats to vets, writing reports for newsletters, answering phones, making home visits fostering cats and kittens and working in charity shops.

If you are interested call CP’s national helpline on 01403 221927.

Return to top

ADVICE FOR CRIME PREVENTION IN THE AUTUMN

The children are back at school and the evenings are drawing in. As I write this the summer lingers with the promise of a hot day and shorts and tee- shirts still keep the hope of Mediterranean weather. Yet, in spite of this we go to work and our late afternoon houses betray our absence. Soon the evenings will draw in earlier and the blank faces of our houses will declare their vulnerability more readily. There has been ample advice on security in past messages in the Northwood Hills Echo. You can obtain a security survey by phoning the number below. BUT: Please make you house look occupied. Lights timed to switch on, fluorescent lights left on and talking radio programmes give the impression of occupancy. A car in the drive, where an oil-stain would betray your absence, or mail or milk on the step. Be sure that unattended young people are responsible and will not allow unwanted guests into your home.

Go Well, have a safe Autumn: Malcolm Ruddock PC163XH, Tel 0208 246 1941 (answerphone)

Uxbridge Police Advice Line

now operating

020 8246 1501

Return to top

ODD FACTS

Two parts of the body that never stop growing – ears and nose

A sneeze blasts out of your body at 100mph

Women blink twice as much as men

It takes 3 months to replace a nail from base to tip

You shed 40lb skin in a lifetime

Over the next 24 hours you will take around 23,000 breaths

The human stomach lining replaces itself every three days

Your head weighs about 8lb

Your blood travels some 60,000 miles a day around your body

The average lifespan of one taste-bud is ten days

Inch for inch your tongue is the strongest muscle in the body

You come near to death when you sneeze, all body functions stop

A baby’s eyes are the same size as an adult’s

 

Issue 02 last updated 30th November 2006